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Full text of "Kansas State collegian"

AS STATE 
lUftKA, KS 



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EXCH 



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Domitrwic says 
he will not leave 
position on board 



Gerald Domitrovic, under fire for his 
comments In reference to the Holocaust of 
World War II, announced Wednesday that he 
would not resign his post on the city's Human 
Relations Board. 

The City Commission would have to take 
legal action to get him off the board, 
Domitrovic said. In that event he might file 
suit himself, he added. 

Domitrovic said he had contacted 
American Civil Liberties Union attorneys to 
discuss the possibilities of a suit. 

"I would take some sort of action, probably 



on freedom of speech or whatever cause of 
action I might have," be said. "That's what 
I'm presently checking into." 

TUESDAY NIGHT Domitrovic told the 
City Commission that he intended his 
statements to make people think. 

"I was concerned that too many people 
believed things they see on television as a 
matter of blind faith," he said. 

Domitrovic was asked to resign from the 
Human Relations Board Tuesday night by 
the City Commission. 



"I want people to think for 
about this subject," be told the Commission, 
"And realize there are various and 
sometimes controversial evidence in regard 
to the holocaust as there are in most events 
in history. 

"I don't believe that the desire to be open- 
minded and to hear different points of view, 
even on a subject as controversial as the 
Holocaust, is incompatible with being a 
member of the Human Relations Board," he 
said. 



Thursday 

April 27, 1978 
Kansas State University, 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 84 No. 144 



Kansas State 

Collegian 

Carter has 'influence, ' but 
not power, Friedman says 



By CHRIS WILLIAMS 
Editor 

Milton Friedman, Nobel Prize winning economist, 
said Wednesday night the "president of the United 
States has a great deal of influence, but in terms of 
economic policy, he really has very little power." 

Friedman, whose "Free Trade: Producer versus 
Consumer" address will mark the 42nd Landon 
Lecture this morning at 10:30 in McCain Auditorium, 
said although the president can make recom- 
mendations, the Congress usually determines 
economic policy. 

"The federal budget has been determined 
previously by Congressional action over which 
President Carter has some influence but no power," 
Friedman said, "There hasn't really been a federal 
economic policy. There's been a lot of talk." 

Friedman said Carter's indecision has caused 
most of the problems with his economic goals. 

The University of Chicago professor listed Car- 
ter's tax rebate plan and subsequent elimination and 
his pledge to limit an increase in government 
spending as programs that have hurt the president's 
economic reputation. 



FRIEDMAN was also critical of Carter's cam- 
paign pledge to balance the federal budget by 1980. 

"It won't happen," Friedman said of the 
president's promise. "Mr. Carter has not sent a 
balanced budget to Congress at all." 

Friedman also said the United States is entering a 
recession "during which inflation will continue to go 
up at a rate of about 7-10 percent." 

"Everybody favors less inflation, less unem- 
ployment," Friedman said. "But talk isn't going to 
make it so." He said talk, recommendations and 
actions could help alleviate these problems. 

Friedman was asked about the recent record- 
breaking trading day at the New York Stock Market 
in which 55 million shares were traded. 

"Anybody who tells you anything about the stock 
market doesn't know what he's talking about," 
Friedman said with a smile. 

"My standard answer about the stock market, 
when anybody asks me, is to say I'm going to give 
you the same answer that J. P. Morgan used to give 
when people used to ask him about the stock market. 
His standard answer was 'It will fluctuate."' 




Peeping Tom 



Photo by Bo R«MT 



College faculty studies 
upgrading B.S. degree 



By KENT GASTON 

Collegian Reporter 

The requirements for the 
Bachelor of Science degree in the 
College of Arts and Sciences may 
be changed if the current proposals 
to upgrade the curricula are ac- 
cepted. 

Last year the college's faculty 
became concerned that the B.S. 
degree was becoming less 
meaningful in the areas of quan- 
titative reasoning and scientific 
method, which, according to 
Course and Curriculum Committee 
chairman John Lilley, should be 
the heart of the degree . 

"It would be possible, given the 
way the humanities and social 
sciences requirement is phrased, 
for a student to take a B.S. at K 
State without ever having had a 
course in the humanities except the 
required course in philosophy, or 
without any social sciences at all," 
the proposal reads. 

Due to the disparity between the 
Bachelor of Arts degree and the 
B.S. degree, the committee 
recommends a four-course 
requirement in quantitative 
reasoning which would correspond 
to the four -course foreign language 
requirement of the B .A . 

UNDER THE plan, college 
algebra would be required, plus 
three courses in any combination 
from advanced math, computer 
science or statistics. In this way, 
the committee reasoned, the B.S. 
would lean toward a "scientific 
and technical approach rather 
than a cultural and humanistic 
approach." 

The degree would also require 
humanities, social sciences and 
natural sciences. The proposal 
says that only the B.A. has 
required general education in all of 
the three areas. Under the new 
plan both degrees would require 
courses in all areas. 



"The B.S. needed some further 
structure," Lilley said. "We 
wanted to make it correspond in 
some reality to a scientific ap- 
proach." 

Part of the problem, he said, is 
that the B.S. is offered in nearly 
every major, even the "non- 
scientific, non-quantitative 
disciplines." 

"If the B.S. were only offered in 
the scientific disciplines, we 
wouldn't have this problem," 
Lilley said. 

"Many students choose the B.S. 
or B.A. on the basis of foreign 
language only," he added. "To 
give the B.S. some integrity, it has 
to mean something in the general 
education requirement. It now has 
very little to say about the scien- 
tific method." 

THE STUDY by the Course and 
Curriculum Committee will only 
begin to solve these problems. 

"We don't view the study as 
complete," Lilley said. "It's just 
the first step to isolate some of the 
most grievous problems and set 
about to correct those. 

"We suggested tht the study 
continue and make changes later, 
but we agreed that the B.S. needed 
immediate revision. " 

The committee will meet Friday 
to review the comments which 
have been submitted by faculty 
members. If they agree on a final 
document, it will be sent im- 
mediately to faculty members for 
further consideration. 

A regular faculty meeting will be 
held the week before final exams to 
discuss course changes and 
regular business. If the final draft 
of the document is released Friday 
there will be a vote on the 
changes— either to pass, defeat or 
table them. 

If faculty members pass the 
document, it will be submitted to 
(See TERMS, p. 3) 



Pentagon proposes 
closings, cutting back 



Marlin Edwards, senior in horticulture, gets a chance to check out the world 
through a 1,000 mm lens. The lens was one of several on display Wednesday af- 
ternoon in Photography I. 



WASHINGTON (AP)— The 
Pentagon on Wednesday proposed 
streamlining the military base 
structure by closing, cutting back 
and combining operations at 107 
installations from coast to coast to 
save an estimated $337 million a 
year. 

The plan, already under attack 
from protesting congressmen, 
would result in a net reduction of 
23,200 jobs— 14,600 military and 
8,600 civilian— in 30 states and the 
District of Columbia. 

Kansas will remain relatively 
unaffected by the closings. Ft. 
Riley will be required to cut its 
civilian personnel by 188 persons, 
but no other reductions have been 
suggested. 

Because the law requires a 
complicated series of studies, 
many of these actions would not 
take effect for months, and 
possibly years. 

Defense Secretary Harold 
Brown, who has said the military 
base structure is bigger than 
required by the size of the armed 



forces, said the savings could be 
applied to "higher priority needs, 
including increased combat ef- 
fectiveness and readiness." 

Much of the thrust of the 
proposed cutbacks comes from a 
Pentagon drive to brim training 
costs and eliminate excess 
military hospitals. 



Inside 



GOOD MORNING I Mostly 
cloudy with a chance of 
showers and highs near 70. 
Details, page 3... 

SOCCER is becoming a 

popular sport-even with 
children, pages 10 and 11... 

EXTRACURRICULAR 

activities enhance the learning 
experience, but shouldn't 
replace the classroom, page 
15... 



KANSAS STATE COtlEQiAH. Thurs., April 27, 1978 



Frith discusses reduction 
of dormitory operation costs 



By DIANE JOHNSON 
Collegian Reporter 
Thomas Frith, director of 
housing, discussed possible ways 
to cut down on the operation costs 
of the three small residence halls, 
Boyd, Van Zile and Putnam, with 
Boyd Hall Governing Board (HGB) 
Wednesday night. 

Some of the possibilities Frith 
discussed included: having a 
central switchboard system for all 
three halls, having part-time 
directors and closing down the 
small hall food service. 

Frith said the' small halls will 
have one coordinator next year, 
but whether each hall will have a 

Collegian staffer 
resigns position 

Alan Montgomery, assistant 
editorial editor of the Collegian has 
submitted a letter of resignation to 
editor Chris Williams and the 
Board of Student Publications. 

In the letter, Montgomery makes 
allegations questioning Williams' 
management of the paper. 
Williams has denied the 
allegations. 

Montgomery said he could no 
longer work under Williams 
because of a personality conflict 
and a "matter of personal pride." 

"The basic reason for my 
resignation was that there were 
problems with the editor," Mon- 
tgomery said. 

The Board hasn't met for two or 
three weeks, according to William 
Carpenter, member of the board 
and associate dean of Arts and 
Sciences. 

"I haven't seen any letter," said 
Walter Bunge, chairman of the 
board and head of the journalism 
department. 

Bunge said the board hires the 
editor and the advertising 
manager; the hiring of the in- 
dividual staff members is left to 
the editor and the advertising 
manager. 

No action will be taken on this 
matter until the board meets. 



full-time director is still in 
question. 

"One of the possible options is to 
have graduate students in each of 
the small halls to act as part-time 
directors," Frith said. 

The possibility of having a 
central switchboard system for the 
three halls wasn't favored by Boyd 
HGB members. Frith said there 
were some technical problems to 
be worked out before a decision 
would be made on the central 
switchboard system. 

FRITH SAID he wouldn't 
guarantee that the food services in 
the three small halls will be kept in 
operation after the next school 
year. 

"I will not even consider it— we 
will have to do what we have to. If 
It means changing the food ser- 
vice—we'll have to," he said. 



many 
halls 



Frith mentioned that 
schools have residence 
without food services. 

"After a couple of years, no one 
will even know the difference," he 
said. 

The Boyd residents said they 
wish to keep their food service. 
Frith explained the food services in 
the larger complexes cost less per 
person to operate than the small 
hall food services since there are 
fewer persons living in the small 
halls. 

The possibility of cutting out one 
staff member in each hall after 
next year was also discussed Frith 
said over $3,000 per year could be 
saved by doing this. 

Frith said the deficit of the small 
halls was over $127,000 last year 
and he hopes to reduce the deficit 
by applying some of the 
possibilities. 



Fraternity cancels payment 
for Topeka formal services 

A contract dispute between a K-State fraternity and the downtown 
Topeka Ramada Inn has prompted the cancellation of payment on a 
check for approximately $1,000 to the hotel. 

Beta Sigma Psi fraternity canceled payment on a check for its formal 
held at the Ramada Inn on April 15 because its social chairman believed 
the services weren't what the fraternity had contracted. 

"We were dissatisfied with the services we received," said Mitch 
Hoi thus, president of Beta Sigma Psi. "I wouldn't call it a breach of 
contract, but the contractual promises were not met." 

THE FRATERNITY had contracted to have its party in the Grand 
Ballroom but was moved to the Governor's Room the night of the formal. 

"We found out that evening," Holthus said. 

The meal was to start at 7:30 that night, he said. 

"The catering service started serving at 7:05. Needless to say, all of 
the guests weren't there yet That probably caused the greatest 
discomfort. 

"The meat was not cooked to specifications and the waitresses were 
much less than what you would expect from a professional service," 
Holthus said. 

"Our social chairman decided to cancel payment of the check mat 
night It was approximately $1,000." 

The fraternity is in negotiations to reach a settlement, Holthus said, 
but as yet "no one has made an offer." 

Rolla Cunningham, manager of the Topeka Ramada Inn, has refused 
to make a comment. 





TAMI 

New T-shirts with little 
sleeves and lots of shape. It's 
a great look on the green and 
off. Team them with Culot- 
tes, pants, and skirts. 
Left: Boat neck T-shirt piped 
in yummy colors. A soft poly- 
ester/cotton blend .... 16.00 

Zip front culotte 23.00 

Right: Placket front T-shirt 
in polyester/cotton knit. Con- 
trasting trim 16.00 

Trim straight 

legpant 21.00 

GERMAINE MONTEIL. 
Golden Tanning Cream to 
promote a glorious golden 
tan. . .gradually. This 
moisture-rich cream con- 
tains a moderate amount of 
screening agents. Your skin 
will feel soft and smooth and 
your tan will look sleek and 
polished 5.00 



( — Boldface 

„ J By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

Manneken Pis abducted 

BRUSSELS, Belgium— The Manneken Pis, a 
statue of a small boy that once served as a fountain 
and eventually became one of Belgium's best- 
known landmarks, was stolen early Wednesday 
from its stand in downtown 'Brussels. 

But two anonymous telephone calls gave hope to 
Brussels residents that the statue of the little boy 
urinating on a street near the Grand Place, the 
main square of Brussels, would be returned. 

One call to Belga, the national news agency, said 
the statue was stolen as a student prank and would 
be returned in good condition within 48 hours. The 
other, to Belgian radio, said it would be found 
soon— dressed in the bellhop uniform of the hero in 
a Belgian comic strip series that is celebrating an 
anniversary. 

The statue has been stolen a number of times, 
but the little figure that is photographed by most 
foreigners who visit Brussels is not the original 
bronze sculpted by Jerome Duquesnoy in 1619. 
That is kept in the Municipal Museum on the 
Grand Place. 

Standards of living sat 

WASHINGTON— The average urban family of 
four in the United States must earn $17,106 a year 
to maintain a middle-level standard of living, the 
Labor Department said Wednesday. 

In its annual report on urban family budgets, the 
department said the typical four-person family 
would have to make $10,481 a year to maintain the 
government's hypothetical "lower-level" stan- 
dard of living, and $25,202 to enjoy a "higher- 
level" standard. 

The income levels represent the cost of three 
hypothetical lists of goods and services, including 
taxes, that were drawn up in the mid 1960s to 
portray the three relative standards of living. 

Inflation major concern 

WASHINGTON— Americans are willing to make 
individual sacrifices in their lifestyles to help 
battle inflation and have lost confidence in 
government and other institutions, pollster Lou 
Harris said Wednesday. 

"Basically, our people are far more concerned 
with the quality of life and far less with the 
unlimited acquisition of more physical goods and 
services," Harris told a Senate subcommittee. 
"These are radical findings by any measure, 
because they mean that the age of materialism as 
we have known it is going to be radically altered." 

Harris said his polls show the No. 1 issue facing 
the country is inflation, with 82 percent of those 
responding saying they worry about rising prices. 

Dodge City calls on Carter 

DODGE CITY— The Dodge City Chamber of 
Commerce has called on President Carter to 
declare a state of emergency in the grain belt 
"because of the lack of adequate rail cars to ship 
presently stored grain from elevators and ter- 
minals to coastal shipping ports." 

The chamber urged Carger to take immediate 
action requiring railroads to allocate grain cars to 
affected areas "because the critical situation now 
existing will soon be further compounded by the 
inability of elevators to ship or store the 1978 wheat 

crop." 

"Due to financing limitations imposed by the 
inability to ship currently contracted grain, our 
area elevators have stated they will either 
discontinue the purchase of additional wheat 
within the next 60 days or will defer the payment 
for wheat purchased for an indefinite period until 
adequate transportation is available," the 
chamber said. 



T 



Local Forecast 

Today wiU be mostly cloudy with a chance of showers 
and thundershowers through Friday. High today near 70 
with a 40 percent chance of rain. Fifty percent chance of 
rain tonight with a low in the upper 40s. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thura., April 27, IMS 



Campus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
MOL TON SCHOLARSHIP: Application! for 
tn« t»0 award are available to sen ion and 
graduate students In fti* Dean's office. Holton 
Hall. Deadline is May I. For more in- 
I or m at ion, con t oc I J ofi n R e aden c e , 2 SSW. 

PRE NURSING STUDENTS can nor up for 
the May 4 meeting and dinner In Mr*. 
Samelson's ottlce. 

TODAY 

ARCHITECTURAL ENOINEERS wtll mow 
• movie. "The Gateway Arch," In the Union 
Lltlte Theatre at*:»p.m. 

Terms for degree 
may be changed 

< continued from p, n 
the Academic Affairs Committee 
of Faculty Senate. Senate won't be 
able to meet to consider the 
document until August. If the 
document is approved, the changes 
will go into effect in May of 1979 at 
the earliest, according to Lilley. 
Only freshmen enrolling after May 
1979 would be effected by the 
changes. 

Lilley said curriculum reform is 
"a very active field across the 
country now." Such reform is 
trying to reverse decisions made in 
the 1960s which eased 
requirements. 

"This is a modest proposal," he 
said. "Both suggested changes are 
not overwhelming redirections of 
the degree but attempts to make it 
truly a Bachelor of Science 
degree." 

Berghaus to lead 
1979 senior class 

Scott Berghaus, junior in 
business, will lead the 1979 senior 
class after being elected president 
Wednesday by this year's junior 
class. 

Also elected were Janet Elliot, 
early childhood education, as vice 
president; Patty Field, junior in 
social sciences, as secretary; and 
Brian Hettrick, junior in 
engineering, as treasurer. 



OREEK WEEK COMMITTEE will meet In 
union KM at? p.m. 

alpha KAPPA Ml will moot at Kite's at 7 
p.m. 

BELT DARLINGS will meet at the Dtlt 
house at 9 p.m. 

GOLDEN HEARTS will meet at the Sigma 
Phi Epsiion house at to p.m. 

RHOMATEI will meat at Rock in' K at 1 p.m. 
lor auction. Wear T shirts. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION 
will meet at Danforth Chapel at e:4S p.m. 

WOME N IN COMMUNICATIONS will meat 
In Kedile Library at a p.m. for elections. 

FMA HONOR SOCIETY Wilt meet at M03 
Anderson el i p.m. for barbecue. 

PHI ALPHA THETA will meet In 
Elsenhower Ml after "These are the Good Okf 

Days" tor elections 

Al ChE will meet In Den I son 11 i at * : X p.m 
for elections 

HOME ECONOMICS HONORS PROGRAM 
taring forum will ba In Justin 10* at J p.m. 

FRIDAY 
ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING will 
show a movie on the building of tht St. Louis 
ircrtintheUnioriLiftle Theatre at 4 : 30 p. m. 

ALPHA ZETA initiates will meet at the 
shelter house. Sunset loo, at 1p.m. far maXe 
up workday Actives are es*ed to attend. 

CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST will 
moat In the Union Rig I room at J p.m. 

SEHIOR CLASS final fling will ba at Tuttle. 

below the tubes at 2 p.m 

INTER VARSITY CHRISTIAN 

FELLOWSHIP will meat In Union 112 at 7 p.m. 

KAPPA SIGMA STARDUSTERS will meat 
at Blue Lou at 3X p.m. 

DIETETIC STUDENTS will have a picnic at 
Turtle; meet In Justin parking lot at a p.m. 
Bring your own food and beverage 

SATURDAY 
ALPHA CHI SIOMA Initiation will ba in King 
Hall, third floor, at* a.m. 

SOCIETY POR CREATIVE 

ANACHRONISM medieval festival will ba at 



UMHE and Durland field from 11 a.m. to 4 
p.m. The public is invited 

* 
DAIRY SCIENCE CLUE dairy judging 
contest will be at me dairy center at 1 p.m. 

SUNDAY 
ALPHA CHI SIOMA PRC banquet will ba at 
Gregov'talep.m. 

KSU RECREATION CLUB will meet at CI co 
Park for a cookout at S p.m. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OP INDUSTRIAL 

ENGINEERS will meet at Kennedy's at S:M 
p.m. 

K-LAIRSS will meet in the Union KSU 
rooms al 7 p.m. 

KANSAS STATE SPORTS CAR CLUE will 
meet at the parking lot north of Water* Hall at 
• a.m. 

ALPHA PHI omega will matt in Union 111 
el I p. m. for activation of spring pledge data. 

KAPPA SIOMA STARDUSTERS will matt 

at the Kappa Sigma house at I p.m. 

ARTS A SCIENCES COUNCIL will meet In 
Union 107 at 7 p.m. 



Cavalier, \f 
Club A 

has it 
all! 

* THE BEST 

FOOD 

( Steaka-Seafa-aVSpeclaUUe* S-H 
p.m each night bat See. ) 

* SANDWICHES 

( BsjslEjj Bervtd AayUme! ) 

* DANCING 

(Country Swing-Rock) 

* GAME ROOM 

(Wild and Craiy!) 






WEEKEND DISCOUNT 

atna, 

INTRODUCES 



otrtmototrin 



'i Saturday Night and 

GettaftECrfiysai 



STORM MOTHER'S WORRY 1 
WEEKEND DISCOUNT 




The Manhattan Jaycees invite you to attend the 

Miss Manhattan K-State Scholarship Pageant 

Saturday, April 29th, 7:30 p.m. 
Manhattan City Auditorium 



Admission: Adults 93 Children under 12 12 

Tickets at Seart, J.C. Penney's, Chamber, Main 
Banks or from contestants. 



Featuring: MISS KANSAS 
Miss Manhattan K-State and 
K-STATE CONCERT 

STAGE BAND 

Sponsored by : 

Manhattan Jaycees, 

McCall Pattern Co., 

MECCA and Manhattan Mer 

chants' Businesses and Pageant Friends 




1978 SEMI-FINALISTS: 
Debra Earner, Ford Hall-Tau Bete Sigma; Patricia Beier, Luckey 
High; Sherrie Bennett, Troy, Ks.; Kandyce Berry, Chi Omega- 
Ford Hall; Shirley Bruey, Smurthwaite; Muffet Clem, Delta Delta 
Delta-Ford Hall; Janan Cupit, Putnam Hall; Mary Gilliland, Gam- 
ma Phi Beta; Kathleen Heimerman. Smurthwaite; Susan Stigall, 
Delta Delta Delta-Boyd Hall; DeAnn Tucker, Goodnow Hall; and 
Robin Walker, Alpha Kappa Alpha. 
Major Sponsors : McCall Pattern Co. and MECCA 

$100 Sponsors: Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. of Manhattan, Union National Bank & 
Trust Co., First National Bank, Kansas State Bank, Citizens State 
Bank & Trust Co., S&A Electric, Farm Bureau Insurance Services 

Contributing Sponsors: Sears. Roebuck & Co., Music Village, Stevenson's, J.C. Penny. Limbocker's- 
Bocker's 2, Manhattan Floral Co., Fashion Two-Twenty, Frontier East, Reed * Elliot. 
Southwestern Bell, Campus Cleaners, Blaker's Studio Royal, Bailey Moving and 
Storage. Ramada Inn, Watson Transfer, The Collegian, KMAN-KMKF Radio, Manhat- 
tan Mercury, Chamber of Commerce 

Advertatlng Sponsors: Kinin Lamber Co,. Roches Barber 4 Beauty Salons. Soupene • Alignment, Hester* 4 KeUer'i Too, Ryan 
Realty. Burnett David Paint Store, Skaggs Fori. Manhattan Federal Savings * Loan. Powell Brothers, Int.. The 
Sirloin, Acker electric, inc., Kites. Home Savings and Lean. Larry Scoville-Cnlon Central Life. Tne Master Teacher. 
Capital Federal Savings * Loan Assn., Century Zl-Town * Country Real Estate. Brake Real Estate, the Added Touch, 
Pier I Imports, Cowan-Edwerde-Yorgemen Funeral Hatae, Mike's Standard Service, American Homes Realty. The 
Clothe* Closet. Rolling Hitss Real Estate, MM* Office Equip.. Inc., Cinderella Cleaners. Viata Drive-In. Darell's 
Cmtaea Van*. Manhattan Mutual Life taa. Ce.. Han- by Rich A Frseod*. Wnednrd Mobile Home* 



' 



Please 
exit 



—Opinions — 

Art it in ttpHr>ng on this page do not necenaniy reprastnt the entire Coil**. an 
•.mi er tut loin pi Student PvBiicat.oni 



To maintain Gerald Domitrovic on the Manhattan 
Human Relations Board (MHRB) is to dishonor the 
Americans who fight— hard— to improve human 
relations. 

Domitrovic, who has well-established ethnic 
ignorance in two Manhattan Mercury letters to the 
editor and in an April 20 Collegian interview, should 
have been removed. The Manhattan City Commission 
has allowed him the privilege of resigning. 

At the Commission's meeting Tuesday, Mayor 
Robert Under said one of the major objectives of the 
MHRB was to "foster good will, cooperation and 
conciliation among groups and segments of the 
population of the city." 

HUMAN relations. By definition, it speaks of 
communication, interaction and understanding 
among people. And "people" is an all-inclusive term. 

If Domitrovic can't understand the dehumanizing 



agony of the extermination of the Jews and of the 
oppression against other ethnics, it is clear he has no 
place on the MHRB. 

Freedom of speech is one of America's greatest 
ideals. Domitrovic had every right to state his 
opinions on Jews and other ethnics. But when it raises 
serious doubts about his effectiveness on a human 
relations board, it is time he moved on. 

HIS DISSIDENT opinion may add a diverse flavor to 
the MHRB, but extreme dissidence hampers ef- 
fectiveness. The situation is comparable to Jack the 
Ripper sitting on a rape prevention board. 

Diversity of opinion within a group should come 
from members who at least believe in its 
organizational philosophy and objectives. There's no 
point in belonging to a group if you don't believe in the 
very reasons for its existence. 

VELINA HOUSTON 
Editorial Editor 



Tim Horn n 



What has happened to. the 
American ideology of freedom of 
speech or the right of the public to 
peacefully assemble and to ex- 
press opinions? I was always under 
the impression that the First 
Amendment to the Constitution 
gives a person the right to voice an 
opinion without harassment even if 
that opinion suggests that the 
government has become 
destructive and therefore the 
people have the right to alter or 
abolish that government and 
create a new one, 

Somehow this ideology, also a 
Constitutional law, has been tossed 
aside and forgotten. Diversity of 
thoughts and ideas are no longer a 
number one priority. 

I only hope this phenomenon is 
temporary and someone kicks our 
senses back into place. 



Free speech adds diversity 



IN LAWRENCE an exhibition 
titled "Full Circle: The Rise and 
Fall of Nazi Germany" was can- 
celled by University of Kansas 
officials because of adverse 
reactions from the public. It was 
something they didn't want to hear 
or see. Instead of ignoring the 
exhibit, the public demanded it be 
cancelled because it was of poor 
taste, being displayed only a day 
after the NBC television series 
"Holocaust." 

"It was the general impression 
that this was going to be some sort 
of glorification of Nazism and 
that's so farirom the truth, we felt 
we had to cancel it," said a KU 
official. 

The collection of Nazi artifacts, 
which had nothing to do with the 
murders of Jews of the Germans, 
included a punch bowl owned by 



Hitler, a painting done by Hitler, 
some letters and pieces of Her- 
mann Goering's dinnerware. And 
other stuff hardly worth the effort 
to cancel. 

THE SUNDAY after the 
television series Shana Alexander 
said on the CBS news show "Sixty 
Minutes" that members of the 
American Nazi party should not be 
allowed to march through the 
Jewish community of Skokie, 111. 
She said such a march would do 
more harm than good. 

However, she didn't say how 
such a march could be prevented, 
as long as it remained peaceful on 
the part of the Nazis, without 
breaking constitutional law. 

Closer to home, a Manhattan 
man, Gerald Domitrovic, has had 



threats over the phone and has had 
his position as a member of the 
Manhattan Human Relations 
Board threatened because of 
comments he made about 
"Holocaust." 

He questioned some of the facts 
of the show and said "there have 
been tremendously big lies told. 
They tell about gas chambers and 
concentration camps, in reality 
these were just work centers." 

BECAUSE of his views, the 
Manhattan City Commision has 
asked Domitrovic to resign, thus 
removing all the diversity of 
opinion from the board. 

1 suggest that in the future it be 
stated in the job description of the 
Human Relations Board that, 



"Any board members who ex- 
presses publicly such thoughts, 
opinion or ideas that do not match 
those thoughts, opinions or ideas of 
the Human Ralations Board or the 
thoughts, opinion or ideas of the 
City Commission and which are not 
the general thoughts, opinions or 
ideas of the citizens of Manhattan 
that board member will be asked to 
resign." 

I ALSO suggest that Domitrovic 
do resign, only because it would 
become impossible for him to fully 
do the job of a board member. It 
would mean working with the 
Manhattan Jewish community and 
the local chapter of the National 
Association for the Advancement 
of Colored People who obviously 
wouldn't work with him but against 
him. 




AMD IN APFRB3ATiCN ( l PKDWISE NOT TD G^£ B^X ANDll^Tt) OW&E ALL THE 
fcWm$ ft* ff LEAST A YE* ORSD.' 



Letters to the editor 

Gays here to stay 



Editor, 

We "hard-working, hard- 
drinking" definite homosexuals 
are also fighting mad about the 
letter to the editor that appeared in 
the April 18 Collegian. 

To the charge that the 
Homophile Alliance of Riley 
County has been extended 
"awfully long reins" in regard to 
senate-funded gay dances in the 
Union, we say baloney. Diehl didn't 
know what the hell he was talking 
about. Since HARC was formed 
earlier this year, we have never 
received any financial aid of any 
kind from either the student senate 
or any other campus or city 
organization. Money for a dance or 
any other function, and all ads was 
raised by private donations from 
within our organization. 



Kansas Sta te Coll egian 

Thursday. April 27, 1978 

THE COLLEGIAN is published I, Student Publications, inc., Kansas Slate Univ»r*ity, 
daily except Saturdays, Sunday*, holiday* and vacation period! 

OF F ICES are in the north wing ol Kedile Hall, phone 'Saj 6S5S 

SECOND CLASS pottage paid at Manhattan. Kansas **»! Publication NO. Ml WO. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

SIS. one calendar year. S7 », one semester 

THE COLLEGIAN (unctions in a legally autonomous relationship with the University 

and Is writien and edited by student* tervlng the University community 

Chris William*, Editor 
Mark Tindle, Advertising Manager 

Dennis Boone, K ay Cole* ■■, ^l^lSiErl 

j„t Anderson, Becky B.rtfft . 6- fe EdlSr 

Photography editor 

Sports Editor 

A»t SportsEdltor 

Features Editor 

Asit Features Editor 

Copy Editors 

. City Editor 



Cardathon chairman 
deals out thanks 



ve I in* Houston 
Tom Bell 

Barney Parker 

kevm Banner 

Beccy Tanner 

joterveHoss ■" 

Jane Hiagins, Lisa Sandmeyer, Krl* Tilton ■ 

Dave Hughes 

Doug Daniel 

Aiiison Erkeleni 

Paul Rhode v Tim Horan, Nancy Hor*t, Jason Schatt, 

Bill Nadon. Dale Million, Mary Wood 



SGA Editor 
Arts and Entertainment Editor 



Start Writers 



Editor, 

April 5 to 11, Kappa Kappa 
Gamma sorority and Acacia 
fraternity held the sixth annual 
Black and Gold Cardathon to raise 
money for charity. This year's 
marathon was a success, yet would 
not have been so without the help 
and support of many people. 

WE WOULD like to take this 
opportunity to express our ap- 
preciation to Case Bonebrake who 
enabled us to obtain a location in 
front of the K-State Union, and to 
the Coleman Company of Wichita 
who generously provided the use of 
a tent, heater and lanterns for the 
Cardathon. 

A final thanks is extended to all 
K-State students and Manhattan 



residents who supported us with 
pledges and contributions during 
our endeavor and enabled us to 
raise 12,283.87 in pledges for the 
Shrine Hospitals, the Capper 
Foundation for Crippled Children 
and the Douglass Center of 
Manhattan. 

Steve Griffith 

Junior in engineering technology 

1978 Cardathon chairman 



The Collegian welcomes 
letters from readers. 

Letters may be submitted 
(preferably typed) in Kedzie- 
103 or the editorial desk in the 
newsroom. 



AS A bonafide recognized 
campus organization, we have the 
right to use Union facilities just as 
any other minority group as long 
as we follow the normal 
procedures and regulations. 

As for the agitation raised that 
we refer to anyone who wears blue 
jeans as gay, this is a totally 
ridiculous misconception by Diehl. 
The advertisement was intended to 
be a pun to make people realize 
many people wear blue jeans, just 
as many people in Manhattan are 
gay. If Diehl can't see the satire in 
such an ad, he ought to go back and 
take his freshman literature 
courses again. 

The fact that the "ail-American 
ruff-necks" would like to remove 
us from the face of the earth 
reveals the Archie Bunker type of 
mentality that gets K-State 
referred to as "Silo Tech" and the 
redneck capital of Kansas. 

IF DIEHL and his 43 other 
cohorts feel that we are disgracing 
Riley County by having a dance to 
raise money for our organization 
and to contribute to the Kansas 
Coalition for Human Rights legal 
defense fund, then that's just 
tough. It shows the bigoted, 
uninformed bias which is so 
prevalent on this campus and in 
many other parts of this country. 
We are not out to muddle K -State's 
or Manhattan's image in any way. 

No patrons of Rockin' K or any 
other group is going to dictate to us 
how to live as we see fit, becaust %, 
we've been around for a long time 
and. honey, we're here to stay. 

Greg Nett 
Sophomore In journalism 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurs,, April 27, 1978 



Letters to the editor 



Shah's regime: no freedom 



Editor, 

In the Name of Allah, Imam 
Kahmeinni's message to the 
Iranian people. Greetings to the 
progressive clergy who resist in 
solid unity against the stooges of 
foreign power; greetings to 
religious scholars from Iraq and 
all over Iran who cooperated in the 
struggle against oppression and 
looting of the country's resources; 
greetings to students in the 
universities and secular schools, 
those who paid tribute to the 
Islamic faith and to their beloved 
motherland by their intelligent 
uprising. 

Greetings and honor to the 



people of Iran who, inspite of all 
prosecutions, defended the justice; 
some of them died for their beliefs. 
God may bless the souls of all who 
were massacred in June 1963 and 
December 1978 during Mohharam 
(first month of the Moslem lunar 
calendar, which is considered a 
period of mourning for martyrs). 

THE Mohharam refreshes our 
minds and builds our deter- 
mination to revolt against Goliath 
at each age. Mohharram heritage 
teaches us to consider sacrifice in 
combating the oppressor, a top 
priority for each faithful Moslem. 
The June 1963 uprising trained our 



Crowd in with Tuttle, 
banana boats, Hardee's 



Editor, 

As concerned dorm residents, we 
have suffered intense mental 
anguish and hours of lost sleep due 
to the Edwards Hall food crisis. 
This perplexing problem was 
unperplexed late last night at 
Haymaker Hall. 

Making Edwards Hall residents 
walk almost 700 miles a year to 
Kramer is a fine solution, but it will 
create one small problem: the 
inevitable overcrowding of 
Kramer Food Center. We humbly 
offer a simple solution. 

The residents of Goodnow and 
Marlatt can walk to Derby Food 
Center. This will mean Derby 
complex residents will have to eat 
at Boyd, Putnam and Van Zile 
halls. To cut costs at the small 
dorms, Putnam can eat at Smurth- 
waite, Van Zile can eat at Hardee's 



and Boyd can eat potluck at the 
Wildcat Inn apartments with 
Celeste. Smurthwaite can picnic by 
the tubes at Tuttle. 

Since there will be so much 
moving, Tom Frith shouldn't mind 
being relocated to a banana boat 
without air conditioning down the 
Kaw (provided, of course, it is 
constructed of material with a 
flame spread number over 75) . 

We, too, agree with Bernard 
Shaw. We think the judge and also 
Frith should see the murder scene 
in "Looking for Mr. Goodbar." 
Then he will know that Al Gold- 
stein's case even was right over 
our young heads. 

Kevin Brockhof f and Tom Pacha 

Sophomores in agricultural 

economics 

and three others 



Even if he's a bigot, 
keep the different voice 



Editor, 

Gerald Domitrovic belongs on 
the Manhattan Human Relations 
Board (MHRB). 

If he is a bigot (and this isn't yet 
proven) he belongs on the MHRB 
exactly because he is one. 

Always, it's the dissident who 
electrocutes our complacency. The 
dissident may be a Joan of Arc, 
John Dean. Ivan Ilich or Henry 
Miller. 

The effect is the same: change. 
In this situation, for the better. If 



Domitrovic is found unsuitable, he 
will go. If he stays, he is— in this 
democracy— a different voice. He 
has made people talk about the 
MHRB. 

Perhaps for the first time in its 
14-year history an MHRB action is, 
like an Odious, yes. Alive, ob- 
viously. 

Rita Shelley, 

Mike Dixon and Krisii Short 

Seniors in journalism 

Dan Relff and Mitch Holthus 

Juniors in journalism 




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fighters and consolidated the 
determination of the masses of our 
people in fight against foreigners 
and their lacky, the Shah. 

Since that uprising life has been 
harder for foreigners and their 
local allies as universities and 
bazaars have become citadels of 
struggle for justice and faith. 
Recent uprisings are the waves of 
the June 1963 movement. And that 
is what makes the Shah restless as 
he sends his dagger-carrying goons 
to battle the masses. 

After the Shah made his deal 
with Carter, his agents started 
provocations and then machine- 
gunned the people in the holy 
mosque of Qum. The people 
rebelled and this uprising was a 
referendum of the masses calling 
for his abdication. 

I HUMBLY ask the nation, 
clergy, students, merchants, 
peasants and all classes of people 
inside and outside the country to 
unite. I ask you not to get involved 
in dividing quarrels. I ask you to 
struggle to cut the foreign yoke and 
rely on God's help and Islamic 
traditions which sanction justice. 
Tell those who are talking about 
constitutional monarchy to realize 
that corrupted royalty is in con- 
tradiction with Islam. 

As long as the Pahlavi dynasty is 
ruling there is no freedom, in- 
dependent or happiness for the 
Islamic people. 

Rooh' Allah El Moosavi 

El Khomeini 

Islamic Association Persian Group 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurs., April 27, 1978 



Legislation slows in Senate Fl^th^^ 



By STEVE THOMPSON 

Collegian Reporter 

Committee work being done 
which doesn't require legislation is 
the primary reason there is little 
business to be considered during 
the Student Senate meeting tonight 
at 7 in the Big Eight Room of the 
Union. 

Senate will hear two resolutions 
and a presentation on the possible 
construction of a new fieidhouse at 
K-State. 

Mick Morrell, senate chairman, 
said most senate committees are 
working on numerous projects 
although it may appear that little is 
being done because of a lack of 
legislation. 

"I know it kind of looks bad, but 
when I talk to committee heads 
(about what they are doing) my 
mind is put at ease," Morrell said. 



Morrell said he admitted some of 
the committees weren't doing 
much, and said that was his fault 
for not giving them a direction to 
work toward . 

"There have been some com- 
mittees that aren't really going 
yet. Maybe I should have been the 
one to give them sortie direction," 
he said. "I suppose it's as much my 
fault as anybody's " 

SENATE WILL hear a resolution 
tonight to urge K-State President 
Duane Acker to review and 
evaluate the performance of the 
Intercollegiate Athletic Council 
iIAC) and to institute any 
necessary structural changes or 
organizational changes. 

The resolution also calls for 
Acker to outline the areas of in- 
volvement of the rAC and stress 



the importance oi full balanced 
student involvement in the 
Council's final structure. 

Senate will also consider the 
approval of Tom Hollinberger as 
assistant student coordinator of 
University for Man ( UFM ) . 

First readings will be heard for 
the approval of University 
Activities Board chairman and 
members, acting student senate 
chairman. Intercollegiate Athletic 
Council members and Judicial 
Board members. 

First readings on bills calling for 
constitutional revision of 
Engineering and Architecture and 
Design College Councils and a bill 
concerning a recommendation for 
Nichols Gym will also be heard. 



TONIGHT* EVERY THURS. NIGHT IS- 
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Refill only Wt-YOU KEEP THE CUP! 

TOMORROW NIGHT: 
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Tt.lK »lld»v 1 1 ;•►•*••>— Dint r all nrgbf (8:3t-aos*) 



Senate committee looks at 
incorporating lobby group 



By DEBBIE RHEIN 
Collegian Reporter 

The Student Legislative Network, a lobbying 
group for K-State concerns, may be part of the 
constitution of the Student Governing Association 
(SGA) in the future, said Brian Rassette, chairman 
of the Student Senate State and Community Affairs 
Committee. 

Although the Network was started by Student 
Body President Sam Brownback, it can be discon- 
tinued when Brownback leaves office. 

Rassette said the network has helped K-State 
receive state funds for Nichols Gym and the overall 
budget He said it would be to K -State's benefit for 
the network to be written into the constitution. 

Rassette said his committee is considering the 
addition to the constitution now, but there is no rush. 

"We are in a hurry to get this through because 
Student Legislative Network is in effect," Rassette 
said. "This probably wouldn't take effect until this 
SLN term is over." 



RASSETTE said the committee is using the time 
to make the wording and organizational details 
precise. 

"See, when you are putting something into the 
constitution, it has to be exactly the way you always 
want it," Rassette said. 

Rassette said the committee is still considering 
which branch of government the network should go 
under. It is a part of the student government 
executive branch now, but it could be put in senate as 
part of the State and Community Affairs Committee. 

Brownback said he hasn't decided which branch of 
government the network belongs under. 

The network is a tremendous advantage to K 
State, Brownback said. If it can continue and grow 
with more contacts, it will benefit the University 
even more, he said. 

"We wouldn't have started it if we didn't think it 
was something that will help, Brownback said. 



Paddy Murphy is Here! 

The men of SAE are thrilled to hear the news 
of the arrival of Paddy Murphy to Manhat- 
tan. This famous founding father and world 
wide derelict is an admired figure in all Sig 
Alph chapter houses. Several kegs have been 
tapped in honor of his arrival. According to 
Paddy, he had just been fired from his job of 
delivering Coors beer. It seems that Paddy, 
as usual, was overzealous in testing for taste 
quality since he drank everything in the 
truck before he could deliver it. On the bright 
side, Paddy announced that he was in search 
of his wife, the LUSHious Lucy Pattie. 
Rumor is that she is in Manhattan! 

• Will Paddy's vision clear so he can 
search for Lucy? 

• Why is Lucy in Manhattan? 

• Will the Sig Alphs sober up in time to 
aid in Paddy's quest? 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thtirs., April 27,1 ITS 



Greek 'Close Encounters' are coming 



By KAREN HOUSTON 
Collegian Reporter 

"Close Encounters with the 
Greek Kind" may not win an 
academy award, but it will help 
greeks get to know one another 
better. 

The "Close Encounters" theme 
was chosen for Greek Week, which 
runs Sunday through next 
Saturday, to promote spirit bet- 
ween fraternities and sororities by 
games, competition and leadership 
meetings. 

A church service for greeks will 
start the week on Sunday. It will be 
at 10:30 a.m. behind President 
Acker's home and an all-greek 
choir will sing. 

Exchange dinners and house 
tours will be Monday with six to 
eight representatives from each 
house attending dinner at a dif- 
ferent house. 

A Greek Leadership Banquet 
will be the highlight Tuesday. 

THE president, houseparent, 
and an alumnus from 



each house will attend the banquet 
in the K-State Union at 6 p.m. The 
Interfraternity Council and 
Panhellenic advisers, Jerry Lilly 
and Barb Robel respectively, will 
also attend. Dwight Nesmith, 
associate professor of engineering, 
will be the speaker. 

Greek T-shirt Day will be 
Wednesday. All greeks will wear 
greek letter T-shirts or T-shirts 
with the "Close Encounters" 
theme. 

Voting for greek queen and king 
will be Thursday. A penny jug will 
be set up in the Union for each 
contestant and students will vote 
on contestant's activities by put- 
ting pennies in the jugs. 

Close Encounter Night will be 
the same night in Aggie ville. All 
bars will have specials for greeks 
wearing greek T-shirts. 

A picnic and kegger will be at 
3:30 p.m. Friday at Tuttle Puddle 
with games and competition. The 
price will be $1.50 or free for those 
wearing a "Close Encounters" T- 
shirt. 

K-State to partake of 
Sun Day celebration 

By SCOTT STUCKEY 
Collegian Reporter 

The arrival of the solar age will be celebrated Wednesday in dozens of 
cities and more than 20 countries— and at K-State— as organizers of the 
celebration have proclaimed the date as Sun Day. 

"Solar collector exhibits, sunrise services, music, kite-flying and 
speches will occur all over the contry," said Gail Kaplan, a na tional 
organizer of Sun Day. "There will be teach-ins, demonstrations, energy 
conferences and fairs at schools and colleges." 

Sun Day events at K-State will include a display of solar collectors in 
front of the Union, speeches and slide shows, a tour of solar homes and a 
sunset celebration on Bluemont Hill, said Russ Brehm, a member of the 
Environmental Awareness Center (EAC). 

WILLIAM JAHNKE, assistant dean and professor of architecture, will 
speak on "solar buildings and design" at 1 p.m. Gary Johnson, associate 
professor of electrical engineering, will speak on "wind energy in 
Kansas" at 1:45. Charles Spillman. associate professor of agricultural 
engineering, will speak on "solar energy and agriculture" at 2:30. Gary 
Coates, associate professor of architecture, will speak on "solar houses 
in Manhattan" at 3:15. These activities will be in the Union Big Eight 

Room. 

There will also be a slide show about the prairie at 10:30 a.m. and 7 
p.m. in the Union Forum Hall, Brehm said. 

"Sun Day will show people some beginning steps they can take to turn 
to solar energy," Brehm said. "We need to start learning how to in- 
tegrate the use of the sun in building. 

"The trend is towards big, centralized power companies, but solar 
energy can be used by individual home owners," he said. 

"You don't have to spend a lot of money to use solar power," said Mike 
Peterman, co-director of EAC. "You don't have to convert your whole 
house to solar power. You can start small. 

"Sun Day is a political push to get the country concerned about the 
energy situation," Peterman said. "We are not putting enough effort into 
finding out about solar energy. We should be looking for energy alter- 
natives and advancements instead of just using up our fossil fuels. " 

SUN DAY is sponsored by a coalition of labor unions, en- 
vironmentalists, public officials and individuals, Kaplan said. The Sun 
Day Board of Directors includes the mayor of Los Angeles, the president 
of the United Auto Workers and the director of the Sierra Club, she said. 

The idea of Sun Day came from the same people who organized Earth 
Day in 1970, Kaplan said Earth Day is credited with helping the en- 
vironmental movement become a national political force. 

Sun Day will officially begin with a sunrise celebration on Cadillac 
Mountain in Maine, where sunlight first touches the U.S. 



THE WEEK will end Saturday 
with Greek Follies. Greek Follies 
are five groups of six fraternities 
and sororities which will create a 
skit for competition. The skits will 
be presented in McCain 
Auditorium at 8 p.m. with ad- 
mission being $1.50 at the door or 
free with a "Close Encounters" T- 
shirt. 

Throughout the week there will 
be specials on beer in Aggieville 
sponsored by Terry Ray, 
Aggieville merchant. 

This year, the Greek Week 
committee decided to sell T-shirts 
that let greeks take advantage of 
specials instead of the buttons sold 
in previous years. Kurt Wolfen- 
barger, junior in horticultural 
therapy and co-chairman of Greek 
Week, said the T-shirts were not a 
money-making project and were 
more practical than buttons. 

"There was a very good 
response," Wolfenbarger said. 
"We sold over 500 and they are a 
good deal for the people who 
bought them. They get to enter the 
kegger and the follies free." 



I Nmcl6a* ?0*/efc Belong* totfefcG if 
Alwavs Has BeeK> ; 0M7HesuK). 

Sun Day 

vued. NAY 3 

4cTivmes iff 

K- STATE 
UMON> 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thgrs., April 27, 1978 







Now com 



©T977 Miller Brewing Co . Milwaukee. Wis, 




While coach Al-Abed explains 
kicking techniques, Angle takes a 
break from practice — without her 
coach's knowledge. 



"It was a lot of fun. I really liked 

the season." AngieMcKinzie 





Upset from being down 1 to at the 
half, Angiecomtemplatesthe 
second half during a break from 
the game. 



"She got mad at the games, but 

losing never bothered her as she 
was a good sport," said Sharon 
McKiniie, Angie's mother 



Ang le f oi lows the ba 1 1 down field 
along with teammate Lisa 
Ferguson. 



"She wasn't fantastic In kicking or 
strong enough because she was 
small, but she was r»m lly en- 
thusiastic and she always followed 
the ball," said Al-Abed, coach 



' It didn' t bother me losing , ' ' A ngie said. "It's just a game. 

Story by Becky Bartlett 
Photos by Craig Chandler 




Hi 



•Maaaatt 




"One game Angie got tripped and 
hurt her arm. She cried, but not 
because she got hurt but because 
she was mad that she gat tripped/ 
said Lorie, Angle's sister 



YOUTH LEAGUE 
SOCCER 

Winning isn 't everything, 
you play the game to have fun 



• ■ 




In a rugged game like soccer, it's not often one runs across someone 
like Angie McKinzie. 

She's tough, dedicated to the sport, competitive. 

She's also 10 years old and the smallest soccer player on the North view 
Elementary Girls* Soccer Team. 

"Angie is one of the best players we have," said her coach, Moham- 
med Al-Abed, a sophomore in civil engineering. "She follows the ball." 

A fifth grader at Northview Elementary School, Angie decided to 
follow her brother Roger and sister Lorie who played soccer last year. 

With no previous soccer experience, Angie began practicing with other 
elementary school students three times a week. 

"They (the practices) teach me a lot," Angie said. "At first I was 
kicking the ball wrong, but Al showed me the right way to kick. " 

The soccer season began March 18 and ended April 21. Angie played 
the forward position through the season. 

Of all the season's games, Angie said she enjoyed the first one the 
most. Her team won. 

"We won because everybody wanted to play and win," Angie said 

THE FIRST game proved to be the highlight of the team's season as 
the team lost the following four games. These games were played during 
cold and damp weather and many of the player's parents wouldn't let 
them participate in the games during adverse weather. 

"It's very hard to play with only nine players when the other team has 
11 on the field" Al-Abed said. "The game shouldn't have been played in 
the cold." 

But Angie said she didn't really mind losing— or even playing in bad 
weather. The thing that bothers her is when others show poor sport- 
smanship. 

"1 would get mad at the other players because they would trip me," 
Angie said. Often Angie was kicked because she went after the ball when 
it was being kicked by an opposing player. 

Although Angie lacked the size of her teammates, her attitude topped 
them all. 

"Angie wasn't fantastic in kicking or strong enough because she was 
small, but she was really enthusiastic and she always followed the ball," 
Al-Abed said. 

However, it takes more than enthusiasm and determination to win a 
game. And Angie has learned that there's a lot more to soccer than 
winning. She experienced the challenge of learning a new game ^d 
working with others toward a team effort. 



12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurt., April 27, 1878 



President to send adviser 
on diplomatic trip to China 



WASHINGTON (AP)— President Carter is sending 
his national security adviser to mainland China next 
month for consultations that will include talks on 
normalizing relations with the Peking government. 

Press secretary Jody Powell said Wednesday that 
Zbigniew Brzezinski, Carter's assistant for national 
security affairs, would be "prepared to reaffirm" 
the administration's goal of normalizing relations 
with Peking. Powell said, however, Brzezinski would 
not be negotiating on the issues blocking diplomatic 
recognition. 

Powell said he knew of no plans for Carter to visit 
China, and that Brzezinski would not be paving the 
way for such a trip. 

Carter has indicated a reluctance to visit China, 
after trips by Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford, until 
high-ranking Chinese leaders make reciprocal 
visits. 

BRZEZINSKI will visit China from May 20 to May 
23 and then travel to Tokyo and Seoul for talks with 
Japanese and South Korean leaders about his Peking 
stop, before returning to Washington. 

The only other senior member of the Carter ad- 
ministration to visit mainland China has been 
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance, who traveled to 
Peking last August. 

Powell said the visit was not meant to send a 



message to the Soviet Union, which is particularly 
concerned about any indications of improved 
relations between Washington and Peking. 

"Our relations with the Soviet Union and the 
Peoples Republic of China are important in their 
own right," he said. 

Powell and other officials stressed that Br- 
zezinski's visit would be made in the spirit of the 
Shanghai communique, a document signed in 
Shanghai in February 1972 by then-President Nixon, 
outlining the direction he and Chinese leaders hoped 
U.S. -Chinese relations would follow. 

THE COMMUNIQUE, Powell said, "calls for this 
sort of exchange or consultation and com- 
munication," and states that senior U.S. and Chinese 
officials "will stay in contact through various 
channels." 

The White House took pains to portray the visit as 
routine, and Powell said that unlike Vance's trip, 
U.S. news reporters would not accompany Br- 
zezinski. Powell said he did not know whether Br- 
zezinski would visit any cities in China other than 
Peking. 

The spokesman said Brzezinski and the Chinese 
leaders would focus on common strategic concerns, 
among them the Middle East and Asia. 



Unfinished business marks 
end of legislative session 



TOPE K A <AP)-The 1978 
Kansas Legislature crawled 
toward adjournment Wednesday 
night with a raft of major decisions 
yet to be made in mid-evening. 

It had become apparent the 
lawmakers were destined to 
remain in session until a very late 
hour. 

Such major items as a liquor-in- 
restaurants cleanup bill, a package 
of tax relief measures, the omnibus 
appropriations bill and legislation 
on workmen's compensation, 
products liability, governmental 
immunity and a "Sunset" law 
remained in conference com- 
mittees trying to effect com- 
promises on them. 

Lost in the last-night shuffle 
were proposals to reinstate the 
death penalty in Kansas, and to 



reduce the criminal penalty for 
conviction of first possession of a 
small amount of marijuana. 

What was regarded as the last 
bill onto which the death penalty 
and marijuana legislation might be 
attached was frozen on the Senate 
debate calendar with virtually no 
chance it would be brought up. 

THE HOUSE passed and sent to 
the governor a bill which abolishes 
the long-standing state census 
compiled by the state Board of 
Agriculture, effective in 1979. In 
the future, the state will rely upon 
the federal census for computing 
money distributions which are 
based on population. 

The Senate approved and for- 
warded to the governor a bill 
changing the process by which 
those convicted of crimes are 



sentenced, and expanding 
probation. The bill increases the 
criminal penalty on rape from a 
minimum of l-to-5 years to 5-to-15 
years. 

Wednesday night's adjournment 
technically did not close out the 
1978 session. That will come May 
11, when a handful of legislative 
leaders will return to Topeka for 
the ceremonial sine die, or final, 
adjournment. 

Earlier Wednesday, the 
Legislature had sent two major 
pieces of legislation to Gov. Robert 
Bennett. 

One will initiate a pilot program 
of testing Kansas school children 
next fall to see if they are 
achieving minimum levels of 
learning. 

The other will provide top 
elected and appointed state of- 
ficials pay increases ranging up to 
40 percent effective next January. 

EARLIER in this three-day 
windup session, the lawmakers 
sent to the governor bills legalizing 
the controversial cancer treatment 
substance Laetrile, and providing 
farmers a measure of tax relief by 
reducing by 15 percent the 
assessed valuation of farm 
machinery. 



State FFA contests 
begin here Sunday 

More than 1,000 Future Farmers of America (FFA) from 120 high 
schools in the state will be on campus Sunday, Monday and Tuesday to 
compete in the 55th annual Kansas FFA Contests sonsored by K-State. 

They will compete in 17 contests including animal science, 
agricultural mechanization and newswriting. 

The top teams in each contest will represent Kansas at the National 
FFA contest which will be in November at Kansas City. 

There will be an extemporaneous speaking contest held in conjunction 
with the Kansas FFA contests. The contest will feature high school FFA 
members who placed in the top five in district competition. 

The awards will be presented by the Manhattan Chamber of Com- 
merce at an awards assembly Tuesday afternoon at McCain 
Auditorium, 

SLAGLE'S GREEN HOUSE 

Flowering annuals— vegetable perennial 




Moped*— The only way 
- to go to school. 

Mr. Moped 

312 S. 3rd 
l-SM-F»-6S«t. 




/* 



— — — — I 



NEXT CTCIP 
fCMJM HALL 

THE^ 

PANTHER OF ALL! 

PETER SElflRS 




[wcl 




iday— 



til ii Minn i 

Di 1006 



COMING 



Johnson 



A little bird just told us that 

IT'S GREAT 

and there's still a place for you! 




UPC Chairperson positions on the following com- 
mittees are open. 

Arts Committee— Ann Gates, Coordinator 776-1957 

The Publicity Chairperson will be in charge of making sure the advertising 

and publicity for the gallery, arts 4 crafts show, print sales and art rentals, 

as well as any special events, are prepared and given to the respective 

media. 

The Showcase Chairperson will coordinate the showcase on the second oor 

of the Rotate Union This will include scheduling the displays and setting 

them up in the showcase. 

The Print Salei/Arto Rental Chairperson will be in charge of Art Rentals 

and returns at the beginning and end of each semester and one print sale per 

semester. 

The Art* 4 Crafta Fair/Special Events Chairperson will be in charge ol 

coordinating the Arts & Crafts Fair and any special events the committee 

chooses to present. 

These positions wUl require approximately 5-10 hoursper week as well as 

additional time when shows are being set up or discussed. 

Coffeehouse Committee— Ken Spangler. Coordinator 776-7194 
The Technical Chairperson should be able to communicate with others suc- 
cessfully ant) be able to teach others the mechanics involved in setting up 
SSSmSm the sound and light systems It is impcrUnt that djis person 
find out what kind of special arrangements are required by the performers. 

Concerts Committee— Myron Molzen, Coordinator 776-7194 
The Promotions Chairperson shall be responsible for outlining all PR cam- 
paigns They shall also serve as a liason to the Promotions Committee and 
will be expected to attend all promotions meetings. This person should 
possess a good working knowledge of PR techniques and will be responsible 
for teaching said techniques to the rest of the concerts committee. 

Travel Committee— Carol Peckman, Coordinator 539-1865 
The Trip Chairperson position requires a willingness to assum* ! res pon- 
sibility, set and meet deadlines, and handle the literally hundreds of deUus 
demanded in working with the professional travel industry The successful 
execution of a tour demands careful attention to every detail of the trip 
arrangements Familiarity and interest with program planning and travel 
planning specifically, is an asset. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT any of. the ^bove listed coor- 
dinators or come up to the Activities Center on the third floor of the K-State 
Union (532-6571). Applications are available now m the Activities Center. 
Deadline for application is April 28 at 5 p.m. 



<H) IT'S GREAT 



< 



1005MM 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurt.. April 27, 1t>78 



T^. 



<C 




SWEET SOLITUDE... Jim Coats, freshman in chemical engineering, 
is one of many students spending their last days before finals 



studying at Fan-ell Library. 



Photo by Grant Sanborn 



As new Miss Agriculture, 
Mills acts as college envoy 



ByBECKYDOUDlCAN 
Collegian Reporter 

Laurie Mills, junior in pre- 
veterinary medicine and K-State's 
Miss Agriculture 1978, has a busy 
year ahead of her. 

In addition to her role as Miss 
Agriculture, Mills will be a fresh- 
man in veterinary medicine next 
fall. 

"I know that vet school takes a 
lot of time, but being named Miss 
Agriculture was an honor, too. I 
think that I will be able to work it 
all out," Mills said. 

Sponsored by the Kappa Delta 
sorority, Mills was named Miss 
Agriculture at the Agriculture 
Awards Assembly April 2. 

Miss Agriculture candidates 
were judged on their knowledge of 
agriculture, activities in the 
college, poise, personality and 
public speaking ability. 

RAISED ON a ranch near St. 
Francis, Mills was a member of 4- 
H for 10 years and the Kansas and 
American Junior Hereford 
Associations for four years. 



She said her backgrounds in 
public speaking and agriculture 
helped her compete in the Miss 
Agriculture contest. 

"One question asked was 'If you 
met a farmer from western Kansas 
that was pro-strike and for 100 
percent parity, how would you 
react? '"Mills said. 

"I replied that the first thing I 
would do would be to find out his 
opinions and how he felt about it 
and then I would try to inform him 
of all the things K-State can do for 
his farming operations," Mills 
said. "As a representative of the 
College of Agriculture it would be 
my responsibility to tell him. 

"I would also suggest his 
working with the agricultural 
economics department and 
perhaps with some of our extension 
departments on grain marketing 
techniques." 

MILLS SAID she would express 
her views on certain issues only if 
asked for her opinion. 

"As a representative of your 
college you can't always press 



Weighty competition matches 
concrete canoes at Tuttle 

It's the sort of thing that often serves as the butt of jokes, but K-State 
civil engineering students will host the K-State Invitational Concrete 
Canoe Race Saturday at the Riverpond Area of Tuttle Creek Reservoir. 

Twenty-two canoes from 14 schools are entered in the competition, 
which is in its fifth consecutive year. 

The race is co-sponsored by the K-State student chapter of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and the American Con- 
crete Institute (ACI). 

Preliminary races will start at 9:30 a.m. and finals wll begin at 1:30 
p.m. There will also be a women's race and a faculty race in the af- 
ternoon, according to Jerry Zovne, assistant professor of civil 
engineering and faculty adviser for the race. 

Concrete canoe races were first stated in 1968 when civil engineering 
students from Purdue University challenged students from Notre Dame 
to a race, Zovne said. 

Saturday's race is being coordinated by Chi Epsilon civil engineering 
honor society under the leadership of Alan Crawford, president 

The canoes, which weigh between 100 and 300 pounds, will have two- 
man crews. K-State will have two canoes entered which civil engineering 
students have been working on since before Spring Break. 

The two canoes built by K-State students are steel-reinforeed, ac- 
cording to Michael Johnson, senior in civil engineering. 

"The concrete is made lighter than water by adding styrofoam 
beads," Johnson said. 

The Kansas sections of ACI and ASCE will provide judges and referees 
for the race. 




Promise him kisses 
but give him 




your opinions on people because 
they might misconstrue them as 
being the college's opinion," she 
said. 

Mills' duties as Miss Agriculture 
will include hosting visitors who 
come to K-State for job interviews, 
making appearances at such 
agricultural activities as the Little 
American Royal and Cattleman's 
Day and talking to high school 
seniors about opportunities in the 
College of Agriculture. 




PINBALL 
CONTEST 

Prizes for the three 

best players. Contest 

ends May 15 

THE 
PARLOUR 

1123 More— Aggie ville 







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2914 TUttle Creek Blvd. 

mil 

Tacos 4 for $ 1°° 

Burritos & Sanchos 

75 e 

Good Friday, April 28 
thru Sunday, April 30 

abo avaflable in Junction City 



donuts by Swannie 



The Manhattan Jaycees invite you to attend the 

Miss Manhattan K-State Scholarship Pageant 

Saturday, April 29th, 7:30 p.m. 
Manhattan City Auditorium 



Admission: Adults $3 Children under 12 $2 

Tickets at Sears, J.C. Penney 's, Chamber, Main 
Banks or from contestants. 



Featuring: MISS KANSAS 
Miss Manhattan K-State and 
K-STATE CONCERT / 

STAGE BAND I 

Sponsored by : 
Manhattan Jaycees, 
McCall Pattern Co., 
MECCA and Manhattan Mer- 
chants' Businesses and Pageant Friends 




1978 SEMI-FINALISTS: 
Debra Barner, Ford Hali-Tau Beta Sigma; Patricia Beier, Luckey 
High; Sherrie Bennett, Troy, Ks.; Kandyce Berry, Chi Omega- 
Ford Hall; Shirley Bruey, Smurthwaite; Muffet Clem, Delta Delta 
Delta-Ford Hall; Janan Cupit, Putnam Hall; Mary Gilliland, Gam- 
ma Phi Beta; Kathleen Heimerman, Smurthwaite; Susan Stigall, 
Delta Delta Delta-Boyd Hall; DeAnn Tucker, Goodnow Hall; and 
Robin Walker, Alpha Kappa Alpha. 
Major Sponsors : McCall Pattern Co. and MECCA 

$100 Sponsors: Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. of Manhattan, Union National Bank & 
Trust Co.. First National Bank, Kansas State Bank, Citizens State 
Bank & Trust Co., S&A Electric, Farm Bureau Insurance Services 

Contributing Sponsors: Sears, Roebuck & Co., Music Village, Stevenson's, J.C. Penny, Limbocker's- 
Bocker's 2, Manhattan Floral Co.. Fashion Two-Twenty, Frontier East. Reed & Elliot. 
Southwestern Bell, Campus Cleaners, Blaker's Studio Royal, Bailey Moving and 
Storage. Ramada Inn, Watson Transfer, The Collegian. KMAN-KMKF Radio, Manhat- 
tan Mercury, Chamber of Commerce 

Adt fritting Sponsors : Kansas Lumber to, Roches Barter * Beauty Salons. S o u pen e 's Alignment. Kellers 4 Krller'* Too. Ryan 
Realty, Burnett DavM Hi in I Store. Skaggs Ford. Manhattan Federal .Savin gs * Loan. Powell Brother!, Inc.. The 
Sirloin. Acker Electric. Inc.. Kiln, Home Savings and Loan. Larry ScovlbVLnlon Central Life. Tar Master Teacher. 
Capital Federal Savings * Loan Ann.. < eniury 71 Town It ( ounir> Real Estate, Brakr Hral F.stalc, thr Added Touch. 
IVr I Imports. I o»in Kd» jrilv Vw(f n»fn K unrnl Home, Mike's Standard Service. American Home* Realty, The 
Clothes CUtsrt, Rolling Hills Real Estate. Hills Malt Equip . Inc.. Cinderella Cleaners. Vista Drive In. Darell's 
Custom Vans, Manhattan Mutual Life Ins. Co.. Hair by Rkk • Friends. Woodard Mobile Homes 



KAMAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Ttmf^ April 37, 1W1 



Trade conference to focus 
on export business profits 



By SALLY PEREZ 
Collegian Reporter 

The Fourth Annual International 
Trade Conference, sponsored by 
the International Trade Council 
(ITC) of the College of Business 
Administration, will be today and 
Friday morning. 

The conference this year will 
focus on what helps and hinders 
export profits. Its purpose is to 
demonstrate to business managers 
ways of enhancing profits. 

James Townsend, coordinator of 
the conference and assistant 
professor of business, said two 
awards will be given at an awards 
dinner tonight. One award will go 
to the company whose export sales 
are less than $15 million, and the 
other award will go to the company 
whose export sales are greater 
than $15 million. 

The Exporter of the Year award 
for the company with sales less 
than $15 million will to go Keonite, 
Inc., and the award for sales more 
than $15 million will go to Cessna 
Aircraft Company . 

TOWNSEND said speakers for 



the conference will include Daniel 
Sheppard from Sheppard Inter- 
national of Hyattsville, Maryland, 
who will speak on "Export Profit 
Opportunities in the Middle East." 
Sheppard has been in the field of 
agriculture for 36 years and has 
spent 12 years traveling in the 
Middle East. 

Ralph Weller, chairman of the 
board for Otis Elevator Company, 
will speak on the lack of export 
trade policy, Townsend said. 

The chairman of the United 
States International Trade 
Commission, Daniel Minchew, will 
also be at the conference to speak 
on the subject of "Prospective U.S. 
Trade Exports Policies." 

Activities for Friday include the 
presentation of the Exporter of the 
Year award by K-State President 
Duane Acker to Gov. Robert 
Bennett. The governor will receive 
the award at a breakfast for the 
interest he has taken in promoting 
export sales from the state, 
Townsend said. 

Townsend said Bennett has been 
the moving force behind the 
Governor's International Trade 



Conference held in Hutchinson. 

Nationally and internationally 
known in the field of Licensing, 
Norman Stepno from Washington, 
DC. , will speak Friday. 

ALSO, Judy Gentile will speak on 
"Hedging and Currency Futures." 

Townsend said this will deal with 
getting money home once you have 
it. 

The ITC, which is sponsoring the 
conference, is a group of Kansas 
manufacturers and includes the 
College of Business 

Administration. 

The broadening and enrichment 
of educational opportunities for 
students is the primary con- 
sideration of the ITC. 

The council focuses on advising 
students of international aspects of 
the curriculum and developing an 
overseas internship along with an 
internship for foreign students in 
Kansas. The council also helps 
arrange international inter- 
university exchanges and an in- 
ternational personnel referral 
service. 




in AtfirvUk^lMriMi < »"»»M H*rb#f «b<W 



Come to Hoov's and see the 
Strippers from 44 ami 8-12 

>orh Friday and Saturday 



What Every Woman Should Know 
About Financial Planning 

presented by 

Naomi McCarty, Ph.D., CP.A. 

APRIL 27th, THURSDAY 12:00 

STATEROOM No. 3 

Sponsored by Women's Resource Center 532-6511 



Pageant contestants to vie for title 
of new Miss Manhattan-K-State 



By CAROL HOLSTEAD 
Collegian Reporter 

One of 12 semi-finalists will be 
crowned Miss Manhattan-K-State 
Saturday night at the 21st annual 
scholarship scheduled for 7:30 in 
the Manhattan City Auditorium. 

The local winner will go on to the 
Miss Kansas Pageant in Pratt in 
July. The winner there will com- 
pete in the Miss America 
Scholarship Pageant in Atlantic 
City this fall. 

The judging will be based on a 
private interview, swimsuit 
competition, on-stage personality 
in evening gown and talent com- 
petition. The talent competition 
will account for 50 percent of the 
total possible points, with the 
remaining 50 percent divided 
equally between the other three 
areas. 

THE WINNER of the pageant 
will receive a $500 scholarship. The 
fourth runner-up will receive a $50 
scholarship, third runner-up will 
receive $100, second runner-up $150 
scholarship, and the first runner- 
up will receive a $300 scholarship. 

Wes Milbourn, account sales 



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executive of radio stations KMAN 
and KMKF will be the master of 
ceremonies. Entertaining will be 
Lori Bergen, reigning Miss 
Manhattan-K-State and sophomore 
in history. 

Special guest appearances will 
be made by Miss Kansas Jill Dirks, 
Wichita, and 1975 Miss Manhattan- 
K-State Rochelle Rorsbert. 

The 1978 Miss Manhattan-K- 
State Pageant is sponsored and 
produced by the Manhattan 
Jaycees. This is the 21st con- 
secutive year the Jaycees have 
produced the preliminary, making 
it one of the older ongoing 



scholarship pageants in the state. 

Tickets for the pageant are $3 
and $2 for children under 12. They 
may be purchased at the local 
banks, from any contestant, at 
Sears and Penney's, or through 
any Manhattan Jaycee member. 
Tickets will be sold at the door on a 
first come, first serve basis. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Thurs., April 27, 1978 



15 



University activities offer 
an alternative to Aggieville 



By KAREN EW1NG 
Collegian Reporter 

For those students not interested in making 
Aggieville the focus of their extra-curricular ac- 
tivities, there' are plenty of opportunities for in- 
volvement in University-oriented programs. 

Whether extra-curricular involvement be in 
music, sports, committees, volunteer work or any 
other activity, the opportunity is available to all 
students. 

"Going to the University every day from eight to 
five with no outside activities can be very tedious, 
but at the same time, the student is here to go to 
school," said Bill Carpenter, associate dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

Carpenter said a student's four or five years at the 
University will be made richer if he or she is in- 
volved in a variety of things. 

Research indicates students involved in various 
activties possess a sense of belonging Active 
students are apt to stay in school longer, more will 
graduate and most tend to make higher grades, 
according to Pat Bosco, director of student ac- 
tivities. 

"They (involved students) are just happier 
students," he said 

Bosco said students need to look at their academic 
careers as a series of investments. 

"For one thing it's good for personal development 
I believe one of the ways in assisting in development 
of your personality is by completing academic 
pursuits with volunteer leadership experience," 
Bosco said. 

• 

THE NEED to learn communication, the needs of 
others and the need to demonstrate to himself and 
employers his ability to work with a variety of people 
and situations is the reason student involvement is 
important, according to Bosco. 

"You can't underestimate communication, 
creative, organizational and leadership skills. These 
can' t be taught out of a textbook, " he said 

Bosco said there are more student organizations 
registered at K-State now than in the history of the 
University. A student may involve himself in the 
government structure within his living group, in his 
particular college, in career clubs, on University 
committees, SGA and many other groups and 
organizations. 



•There's no apathy at K-State. Apathy represents 
lack of interest. We have just the opposite at K- 
State," he said. 

Bosco said students are investing time and energy 
in learning leadership skills coming from par- 
ticipation. 

"This is a universal theme that can be translated 
to any career. People are interested and want to feel 
a part of what's happening," he said. 

PARTICIPATION in extra-curricular activities 
may have an affect on grades. 

"There's a saying that goes leadership calls us in 
for service at the expense of our scholarship," said 
Julie Hampl, senior in accounting and 1978 senior 
class president. 

Stan Watt, senior in agricultural economics, who 
has been involved in SGA as administrative 
assistant to the student body president and in 
various other activities, said his involvement ef- 
fected his grades to some extent However, he said 
an individual has just got to set his own priorities. 

"Grades are important We're up here for a 
purpose, but there's an education to be learned in 
involvement, too," Watt said 

Carpenter said students with extra activities in 
classes should be expected to do the work of other 
students. 

"Some of our best students are involved in a 
variety of extra-curricular activities. These act- 
vities can help students get organized. They can help 
students budget their time, make decisions and those 
in SGA learn how government works which can help 
in classes," Carpenter said 

* 

AS FOR TIME spent in extra-curricular activities, 
Bosco' s formula is f or every hour of classroom work 
the student should spend one hour in volunteer work. 

"I preach moderation. Just studiers lose out as 
those involved in just extracurricular activities lose 
out" Bosco said 

A student who spends more time in extra activities 
than in sehoolwork may need career counseling and 
possible reassignment he said 



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Airport shut-down, timetable 
passes city commissioners 

A recommended timetable for closing Manhattan's municipal airport 
for improvements was approved Tuesday by the city commissioners. 

The recommendation, presented by Commissioner Terry Glasscock, a 
member of the recently-instituted airport task force, calls for closing the 
airport from May to July in 1979. 

Glasscock said the excavation work would be done in 1978 ana tne 
paving would be completed in the Spring of 1979, 

The excavation work would be done in 1978 so the runway could be used 
up to the time for airport is closed for the paving. 

This method would "cause the least discomfort for those who use the 

airport," he said 

The other alternative considered by the task force included closing the 
airport from July to December, and extending the shorter runway to 
accommodate air traffic while the main runway is renovated 

Glasscock said the first alternative was rejected because the airport 
would be closed for 5>6 months during the busiest flying time of the year. 
Also, the winter weather could prolong the closure into the following 

The work to be done on the airport includes lengthening and 
strengthening of runways and approach runways and installing in- 
strument landing and runway lighting systems. 

The total cost of the improvements is set at $4,821,896. 




The Original Hawkinson Family Estate Purchased from 
Kansas State University in 1866! 

27 acres of rolling meadows, blue grass, brome hay, tilled soil 
and a super 1 acre run off pond. 



Open for personal inspection the week-end of 

April 29th and 30th 
Located at mie marker 203 highway 77 North 



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This property has a lovely 4 bdr home with a new propane furnace, new well pump, and a quiet parlor 
with a warm fireplace. The house is surrounded by several good garden spots and sheltered by the 
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For information call: 

Town & Country Real Estate 



913-539-2356 



Manhattan, Kansas 



THURSDAY 

Senior Night 
in Aggieville 



Specials at: 

Kites 

Dark Hone 
Mr.K's 
Brother's 



FRIDAY 



SHIRTS 



Aggie Station 
Cavalier Club 
Mother's Worry 
RockinK 



Specials good for 

seniors wearing senior 

shirts or showing 

activity cant. 



FINAL FLING 


STILL 


at 


on Sale 


TUTTLE 


at 


Below the tubes 


Alumni 


2 p.m. to ? 


House 


Beer, pop, chips 


$ 1.00 each 



and music provided. 



16 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurs.. April 27, 1978 



Schaad's his name and soccer's his game 



By JIM GIBBONS 
Collegian Reporter 

Antelopes, monkeys and snakes were his childhood pets. A soccer ball 
was his toy. His playground was Angola, Africa. 

He's Duane Schaad, junior in veterinary medicine and the leading 
scorer on the K -State soccer team. 

Schaad's parents were Methodist missionaries in Angola from 1947-49. 
His tether taught agricultural techniques to the natives while his mother 
served as a nurse and sometime teacher in the local school. 

Schaad was born in Angola, a former Portuguese colony, and went to a 
Portuguese speaking high school in nearby Zaire. He had to use his 
Portuguese so much that he bad to practically relearn English before he 
returned to the United States upon graduation. 

Schaad's interest in soccer began before his formal schooling. 

"The earliest I can remember, I've been playing soccer," Schaad said. 
"In Africa, as well as Europe, soccer is the big game. Everyone plays it 
And since Angola was a European colony, it was a big sport there." 

SCHAAD PLAYED on the local junior high and high school teams 
there in addition to any pickup games he could get into. 

"Angola had organized school leagues," Schaad said. "We could play 
the area towns and villages. Sometimes we'd play the Army team but 
they'd beat us pretty bad. We also played the embassy teams and could 
hold our own against them." 

Just before Schaad's senior year, his parents were forced to return to 
the U.S. due to civil unrest in Angola. Schaad stayed in Zaire until he 
graduated and then rejoined his parents in Oregon. It was only his 
second visit to the U.S. since his birth and adjusting to life in the U.S. was 
difficult for Schaad. 

"It was toughest adjusting to people," Schaad said. "Everybody was 
so concerned with material things. In Angola we had to make due with 
very little. I couldn't believe that guys in high schools had cars." 

Schaad went to Oregon State and played on its soccer team. 

"Soccer is not a varsity sport at Oregon State but its under the 
auspices of the university," Schaad said. "We practiced on the football 
field and had to schedule times, usually sandwiched between football 
and band practices. 

"The soccer team played their games after the football games. We'd 
move the goals out and play. Quite a few of the fans would stay and 
watch us so we had good crowds." 

AFTER GRADUATING with a degree in animal science, Schaad 
decided to enter vet school. He was accepted to K -State and found time to 
join the soccer team. 

"The atmosphere towards soccer is much different here than on the 
West Coast," he said. "On the coast there are several professional 
soccer teams, quite a few semi-pro teams and almost every college has a 
team. UCLA and the University of San Francisco have two of the better 
teams in the country." 

K -State's soccer team is a club and is not sponsored or supported by 
the athletic department. Members must raise money for travel and 
expenses on their own. 

"Last year we received financial support from Dark Horse and this 
year we held a clinic for youngsters," Schaad said. "We charged each 
person three dollars and showed them techniques of the game in a day- 
long clinic." 

SCHAAD HAS played for the K-State soccer team the past three 
seasons and is currently their leading scorer this year with 16 goals in 12 
games. The second leading scorer on the team is Mike Chadwick who has 
five goals in 16 games. 

Schaad scored nine goals in four games in a recent tournament in 
Wichita, which K-State won. He also had two goals in his most recent 
game, a 4-1 win over Mid-America State Bank of Kansas City. 

In addition, at the Big Eight tournament, he scored four goals in three 
games, the only goals K-State scored. 

"I really didn't expect the soccer team to be that good at the beginning 
of the season," he said, "but the addition of Bob Gahagen at goalie made 
a big difference. He's easily the best goalie in the Big Eight 

"And we've played everybody tough, usually on sheer guts. We may 
not have the best ability, but we never give up." 

SCHAAD PLAYS inside forward and is primarily an offensive player. 
He may be the recipient of a pass from a teammate or may uBe his head 
or feet to pass himself. 

"When 1 was growing up, all my heroes were soccer players instead of 
football or basketball players," Schaad said. "My biggest hero was 
Eusebio, a rival of Pele. He was born in Mozambique and played in 
Portugal until the last couple of years when he's played for different 
American teams." 

Soccer players were also studied in school. Pele's life was recounted 

THE ' 
GREAT 
BUY 'AT BUY. 

JUAREZ it the perfect "angel" 
for entertain ing friends. It just 
tiptoes through the cocktail* . . . 
mixes to Quietly you scarcely 
know it's mere. 

A heavenly bargain too! And 
your local liquor merchant will assure 
you that . . . you can take it with you 

JUAREZ 








-i> 



- v — < jar -«*^ » A 



Photo by Dave Kaup 



SHADES OF PELE... K-State's soccer team's leading scorer Daniel Schaad 
(background) moves In for a goal attempt against Mid-America State Bank of 
Kansas City last Saturday at Memorial Stadium. 



with the same reverence. Americans learn about George Washington or 
Babe Ruth. 

Schaad finds that sometimes soccer conflicts with his studies. 

"I have to spend a lot of time on school and don't always have time for 
soccer," he said, "and it's hard to keep in shape. But somehow 1 1 usually 
manage to find time to for both." 

AFTER HE graduates from vet school, Schaad would like to try out for 
a professional soccer team. 

"I think I'd have a chance to make the taxi squad," he said. "Then the 
team will pay you to pratice and you can travel with them if you want. 
And you can hold down a job when your not playing soccer." 



Royals lose 

KANSAS CITY (AP) — Roy 
Howell unloaded a two-run homer 
in the eighth inning, giving the 
Toronto Blue Jays a 3-1 victory 
over the Kansas City Royals 
Wednesday night. 

Paul Splittorff, who retired the 
first 15 batters he faced entered the 
game with a 4-0 mark . 



ITEHU1LA 



GOLD OR SILVER 
i won tin t, sort led by 

TEQUILA JALI5COS A 

si lous mo aoi»naof 



'heMwj fkmt Safe- 

Vegetable* - Flowerina Annuals 



*♦ 



Upper Hesearci (jrmtJmse^ 



0,*ar. *^ frrif27,28 7:30-5:30 




KS^ Sponsored by KSU Horticulture Club 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Thura., April 27, f 171 



\T 



-* 



Hartman makes critics eat words; 
recruits big man from juco ranks 



For all those critics who say Jack Hartman can't 
recruit a big man, you can shut up now. Wednesday 
the K State basketball coach announced the signing 
of Jari Wills, a 6-9, 220-pounder from Northeastern 
(Colo.) Junior College. 

Joining Wills on the signing list is John Chimel, a 6- 
7, 190 pound-forward from Schaumburg, 111. 

The two players upped the number of K-State 
signees to four. Earlier this month, Hartman an- 
nounced the signing of 6-7 forward Ed Nealy from 
Bonner Springs, and 6-6 forward-guard Tyrone 
Adams from Martin Luther King High School of 

Chicago, 111. , . _ „ 

WILLS IS THE prize catch of the year. Trie 
powerful center-forward twice was a Region DC all- 
juco selection. He averaged 18 points and 12.1 
rebounds per game as the Plainsmen recorded a 23-6 

record 

A 55.5 percent shooter from the field, Wills was 
recruited by Drake, Long Beach State and 
Washington. 

"Jari is big mobile and quick," Hartman said 
"and the fact he can play either forward or center 
adds to our inside depth potential." 

Chimel was a special mention Illinois all-stater, a 
prep all-Arnerioart, a two time all-area (Chicago) 



pick and a three time all-conference selection. 

One of the top prospects from the Chicago vicinity, 
Chimel completed his high school career as holder of 
10 of the 15 Schaumburg basketball records. 

CHIMMEL established new marks in season 
scoring and rebounding his senior year, 21.3 and 12,5, 
respectively, and set a school record with 38 points 
and 20 rebounds in one game. 

In his junior campaign, Chimel averaged 21,2 
points and 10 rebounds per contest. He waB captain 
and MVP on the Schaumburg team both his junior 
and senior years. 

"John is a talented young player," Hartman said. 
"He jumps well, he's aggressive and has the 
strength to perform inside or the range to contribute 
outside." 

Hartman would not say if the 'Cats would ink 
anyone else this season. It is known that the 'Cats are 
still looking for a point guard after Cat Johnson 
bypassed K-State to attend Oral Roberts University. 

Even if he doesn't sign any more players, Hart- 
man called the 'Cats' recruiting season "excellent." 

"Whether or not we add other prospects to this list 
will not change the fact I'm extremely satisfied with 
this group of recruits." 



Surprises aplenty 
as playoffs roll on 



Parrette displays versatility 



By FRANK GARDNER 

Contributing Writer 

Vince Parrette was awarded a 
watch for winning the triple-jump 
at the Kansas Relays last weekend. 
Hedoesn'twearit. 

Why? He's more excited about 
the mile relay, which he anchored 
to a fourth-place finish in 3:10.2, 
than his school-record jump of 52 
feet eight and one half inches. 

"It was nice to win, but it doesn't 
mean that much," Parrette said. 
He was referring to the fact that 
arch-rival Ajayi Agbebaku of 
Missouri was absent. 

When swift Willie Major rein- 
jured his ankle in an earlier race, 
Parrette volunteered to run the 
mile relay. "I had never run a 440 
in my life, even in practice," he 
said. 

Armed with this knowledge, 
Coach Mike Ross decided to load 
the first three legs with ex- 



perienced quartermilers to get an 
idea of the relay's potential in 
future meets. He even participated 
in joking with the team about what 
would happen if Parrette should 
get the baton in first place. The 
quartermilers had all been injured 
outdoors, and were unknown 
quantities. 

What happened on the track was 
like a page from the heroic French 
epic, "Chanson de Roland." Ray 
Hanf destroyed Oklahoma's Bill 
Snoddy with a personal record of 
46.7 to Shoddy's 47.6. ( Snoddy holds 
the world's record in the indoor 
300.) Bill Tanner, out for five 
weeks with a stress fracture, ran 
47.7, Darnell Washington followed 
with a 46.9 leg, after running a 
personal record 46.6 less than an 
hour before. 

THE 'CATS were in first place 



Cards wrap-up Rapp; 
look for new manager 

MONTREAL (AP)-Third base coach Jack Krol was at the helm on an 
interim basis as the St. Louis Cardinals moved Wednesday to name a 
successor to Vern Rapp, fired Tuesday night as the National League 

"'General Manager Bing Devine flew here to announce the oustei -of Itta 
49-year old Rapp only hours after the Cardinals recorded a 7-2 victory 
over the Expos to snap a six-game losing streak. 

While Devine declined to name candidates, speculation on a 
reolacement for Rapp, a stern taskmaster who had trouble com- 
[nScatTng with his payers, centered on ex-St. Louis third baseman Ken 

B °Boyer a former manager in the Cardinals' farm system was passed 
over by club owner August A. Busch Jr. when Rapp was hired in Oc- 
tober 1976 to succeed field pilot Red Schoendienst. 

"We have some people in mind," said Devine. "I can't identify anyone 
or relate any credentials. It will not be any of our top scouts or someone 
in our organization." 

HOYKK IS currently the manager of Rochester, N.Y., a Baltimore 
Orioles farm team. He is believed to be held in high esteem by Devine, 
who described the sacking of Rapp as "inevitable." 

"It's the culmination of a lot of circumstances, a long period of 
unrest-not all of which was his fault and some of which is probably 
normal," Devine said of the firing. 



when Parrette got the baton. "It 
scared the hell out of me," he said. 
With some last-minute advice from 
Chris Muehlbach, Parrette ran a 
respectable 49. 

"It was a very pleasant sur- 
prise," said Ross. "With Willie 
Major healthy we should go under 
3:10 (the NCAA qualifying stan- 
dard)." 

An even better surprise is the 
new enthusiasm the sprint squad is 
displaying. Workouts this week 
have been impressive. Major now 
says he feels better than he has all 
season. Parrette is running the 
sprint workouts "so that I can be 
an adequate alternate for the 
relay." Coaches say this will also 
help his jumping. 

Washington, a senior and 
member of last year's Big Eight 
Champion mile relay team, would 
like to repeat this year. This year's 
team is unanimous in saying "We 
want the school record ( 3 : 07 >. " 

K-STATE'S javelin crew also 
enjoyed great success at the 
Kansas Relays. Frank Perbeck 
recorded a season best of 252 feet. 
The fact that Rogge of Southern 
Illinois threw 290 feet and two 
inches for a world's best this year 
"didn't affect me. I'm improving 
each week. If I keep that up I'll be 
happy" Perbeck finished third. 

Joe Bramlage had a fourth-place 
throw of 226 feet and nine inches, to 
go with four throws over 220 feet, 
Mark Perbeck finished sixth with 
his personal best of 220 feet and 
four inches. TheK-Staters were the 
top three placers from the Big 
Eight, and rank first, second and 
fifth in the conference on the year. 

The Wildcats travel to Drake 
Relays in Des Moines this 
weekend. Weight men Ray Bradley 
and Mike McGeough have looked 
impressive in practice along with 
Ron Nofsinger. With the sprints at 
full strength, it should be a good 
weekend for the newly-confident 
'Cats. 



By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

Denver is on the verge of ad- 
vancing to the semifinal round of 
the National Basketball 
Association playoffs but the 
Nuggets know that getting that one 
last victory often is no simple 
matter. 

All they have to do is ask the 
Washington Bullets. 

Denver holds a 3-1 edge over 
Milwaukee in their best-of-seven 
quarter-final series following a 118- 
104 victory Tuesday night. That's 
the same position Washington was 
in until San Antonio downed the 
Bullets 1 16-105 Tuesday night. 

Both Denver and Washington 
will try to advance at home Friday 
when their series continue. 

IN WEDNESDAY night's only 
game, defending champion Por- 
tland, trailing in the series 2-1, 
played at Seattle. 

Denver's hot shooting wore down 
Milwaukee in the fourth game of 

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their series. David Thompson led 
the charge with 34 points and hit 11- 
of-25 shots from the field. Dan Issel 
had 24. 

The Bucks, on the other hand, 
went five and one half minutes 
without a basket during the second 
period when Denver was building a 
21 -point lead. 

The Nuggets' victory came only 
48 hours after Milwaukee had 
walloped Denver 143-112 in the 
third game of the series. 

SAN ANTONIO used its speed to 
wear down Washington and stay 
alive in its series against the 
Bullets. 



TUTORS! 



The K S.U. special services program is currently seeking tutors for 
next fall. Rate of pay : |3.50/hour for group tutors ; $2.75/hour for m- 
dividual tutors. Qualifications: 3.0 G.P.A. in subject area, depen- 
dable, courteous, and ability to communicate with others of 
various backgrounds. 

If interested, attend GROUP INTERVIEW in K-State Union, Room 
206-A, Tuesday, May 2nd, 4:00 p.m. —OR- Wednesday, May 3rd, 
11:00 a.m., Room 206-A. For more details, call 532-6439. 

Kansas State University is an Equal Opportunity /Affirmative Action Employer. 



Front End 
Alignment 

SOUPENE'S 

1 14 S. 5th 776-8054 




FREE CAN OF WILSON 

TENNIS BALLS WTTH 

PURCHASE OF A PAIR 

OF TENNIS SHOES. 



WE CARRY 



Tr»tam 




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Offer Good at 



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Village Plaza - 537 9201 



J>»- 



k'N.iii- I'l.lUTS 

pllSt'lll*. 



TARTUFFE 





k. ii is, i*. Niuu I'liiwrair} 
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Aiiril 2V -*• !n - ,l, " s M» ( -tin Aiiiliitniiiiti N|>m 
~|ui KnmaiMtN 532-6425 






It 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, ThufO, April 27,1 •?• 



Collegian 
Classifieds 

CLASSIFIED RATES 
On* day: 20 words or toss, $1 .SO, S 
canlo por word over 20; Two days: 
20 words or tost, S2.00, S eonts por 
word ovor 20; Thro* doyt: 20 words 
or loss, 12.25, 10 eonts por word 
ovor 20; Four days: 20 words or loos, 
12.75, 13 cauls par word ovor 20; 
Ftva days: 20 words or loss, *3.0Q, 
19 eonts par word ovor 20. 

CleMitled* are payable in advance unku 
client hM an aatabHshad account wWi Student 

Publication*. 

Deadline la 10 ».m. day batora publication to 
*.m. Friday tor Monday papar. 

Ham* found ON CAMP US can b * edv*rti**d 
FREE iof * p*rtod rart Mcsswog tfwv*) dtyi. 
TTiay can ba petted M Kettle 103 ot by calling 



FOR SALE 



TANDY LEATHER Mto. lup pia a . custom laatnar 



gum, ecoeeaortee, *upp » **, *ojulpm*nl . Caw 
kntvee, frontier. wMtom OM MSSJ WS. OH 
Tom LaaStar Shop. OW Tomi Mas, POM) 



1970-73 Trana Am Spotter "rail 
MM 



trailer hitch to* FlraMnM 
Zaaom drMnfj Hgnta, and a 

1(144-144) 



71 MSsCttM 

battery 837 



TEXAS INSTRUMENTS programmable 
calculators. AH modal* m stock M low 
discount price* On* year laetory warranty. Tl 
9MS *olld tut* *of1war* and TIM pakette* 
In slot*. Programming seal* lane* available. 
5304958 (137-158) 

1974 MOMETTE. "country kitchen." 14x70, two 
ballroom, tncluda* washer and dryer, utility 
ahad, skirted Walnut Grove. 1494 2324. (138- 
148) 

10»» two bedroom, furnished, air conditioned. 
11.400 Tuttl* Craak Trallar Court, Lot 38. 537- 
9410.(130-140) 

12*80 Esquire, with nlc* arrangement, two 
badroom*. fully carp*l*d, furnished, c antral 
air and heat, overtieadnte down*, 10x10 *h*d, 
779-7082.(1*0-149) 

12x80 FRONTIER and 12x68 Buddy mobile 

noma. Both ara two badroom and on lota Call 
T7O3S9o.t140.144} 

' 1974 ORANGE super OMtK, vary good con. 
dWon. Al«o tor aala. mag wfteeM and Kraa. 
8374)810.(140-144) 

SHERWOOD RECEIVER, Modal S-7244, 48 wal- 
la. Good buy. CaM Dan at 837012S. (140-144) 

SUN HANO-gHOar-Hka naw. Will give laaaon*. 
CaH aftar 500 p.m. 14084836. (14MS9) 

1070 VOLKSWAGEN Bug. good mechanical 
condition, naw anow tire*, AMVFM radio. 
depen da ble transportation, good gat wil lin g*, 
7760290 after 5*0 p.m. (141-148) 

ISM PLYMOUTH Fury ID, good work ear, need* 
torn* rape*. Cheap. 1200 or bast oft*. CaH 
5374423 aftar fcSJ pjn. (143-146) 

10x80 GREAT Laka* mobtte noma. PamaMy fur- 



COINS. STAMPS, mllllafy I 
award*, papar, Amatteana, advanialng 
memorabilia. Suy. aall, trad* Traaaur* Ctvatt, 
Oh) Town Mail, pott) 



SUY -SELL Traoa-racordt, tap* 
comic*. Playboy*, Other magazine* 
Coatuma* available lo rant. Traaaur* Cheat, 
Agglevllle (SOtt) 



•to** Skirled and iocatad at Cotonlat Oar- 
dan* Mobil* Horn* Park. 13,500. 7764080. 
(142-146) 

ISM VOLKSWAGEN, good condition, good gaa 

mileage. Can 532 3»7» attar 4:30 p.m. and 
(142-146) 



NEW-WE hav* • *lngi* a) 
lypawrltar with four dllferenl pilch**— all (*, 
pica, proportional and microglia Hull 
Business Machlnaa. 1212 Moro. Agglevllle 
(120ft) 

USED VW parta-baatla and fastback, 
aquaraback parts up to 1071. Body and 

macnanlcal. Call 1-484-236S JAL Bug Service 
(133tf) 

POSTERS, TAPESTRIES, u**d raeorda, 
Playboy*. paper back books, comic*. Baam 
bottla*. baar trays, a la m a and mug*. 
Traaaura Cha*i, Aggtevllle. (134-147) 

LUXURIOUS 107S Marquis Brougham with 
everything. Excallant condition. 16 mpg, low 
mileage. 537-7240 attar 5:00 p.m. (1 43-1 45) 

12x80 IBM Liberty. Fumlahed, fully carpatad, 
pals allowed, reasonably prlcad. 776-4204. 
(143-145) 



STEREO CASSETTE dock, auparacopa 302-A, 
ootby, paak Hmlter, hardly uaad. Alto taper- 
flex watar »W, full concava compalltlon. (75, 
Tom 8374764. (142-144) 

ZENITH ALLEGRO 3000 modular system. 1873, 
AM/FM tMnto. Strack, tumiabl*. Excallant 
condition, graat buy, 1250. Call 776-0420 
batora 300p.m. (142-146) 

1967 CUTLASS two-door coupa, S400 and tan- 
tpaad blcycl* Paugaol, nlc*, WO Slav*. 537 

1445 (142 1491 

SUPER CYCLE -Hartey Oavtdaon FX 1200. 
1075. 5100 miles. 12150. Attar 5.00 p.m.. 537- 
7249. (143-144) 

1075 HONDA CL360 Elactric start, six-speed 
tr*rt*ml**lon, crash bar, paddad backrast, 
3000 mll*s, axcallant condition, 8825. 77S 
7204.(143-148) 

1087 VW bus with 1071 angina. Looks good. 
run* axcallant, 8450. Cell aftar 5:30 779-4901 
(143-148) 



Crossword By Eugene Sbeffer 



ACROSS 
1 Legal action 
5 Insert a 

soundtrack 

I Used to 
clean wool 

12 Requests 

13 Land 
measure 

14 Inter - 

15 Recurring 
regularly 

17 Rivulet 
IS Long period 

II Gnome 
21 Hebrew 

leader 

24 Vagrant 

25 "Madam, 
I'm -" 

2S Declare one 

a saint 
31 Zodiac sign 

31 Edible 
mushroom 

32 Put on 

33 Ready 
35 Ward off 

3v rOSSCSSCS 

37 Citrus fruits 

as -off 

(complete 
quickly) 
41 Marsh 



42The-of 

March 
43 The cosmos 
41 Field of 

snow 
4» Weight of 

India 
St Tart 
II "I" - the 

sparrow 

52 Range of 
vision 

53 Ending for 
six or 
seven 
DOWN 

lAuto 
2Tree 
Avg. solution 



3 "You'll get 
pie In 
the-..." 

4 Regard 
highly 

5 ■*- with 

* faint 
praise..." 

• Swiss 
canton 

7 Summoned 
by waving 

8 Kind of 
copy 

I Medley 

10 Philosopher 
John Stuart 

11 Unadorned 
time: 23mln. 



Haras ansa anas 
Hrasta SH3 onraa 



rawiiB (in 



: I R SLK) M i ICH 



araa wejq 



IDtOlMtiSlTh ICbBSIK 



be sa^n 



MOOT EDI 



333110 QBE iil'SB3 

anoa sail jaan 
nana aara ssei^ 



4-27 
Answer to yesterday's puzzle. 



II Male ferret 
21 Ancient 
Greek coin 

21 Complain 
constantly 

22 Jewish 
month 

23 Rich fabric 

24 Escapees 
from hounds 

21 Shuck 

27 The same 
(L.) 

28 One of five 
regions 

21 Concludes 
31 Gullets 

34 Balanced 

35 Least 
coarse 

37 Bulgarian 
money 

38 Fastens, 
in a way 

31 Ancient 
Greek 
buildings 

41 Son of 
Jacob 

41 Snow field 

44 Born 

45 Fish eggs 
4<Woo 

47 Sea eagle 




27" lanapaad Nlshlkl Olympic man'* bik* Ex- 
caftant condition Bast otfar 778-1430. (143- 
144) 

1063 FLEETWOOD, 10x60 two badroom, par- 
tially turnlahad with air conditioning, avallabla 
aftar final*, 82900 776-3947 aftar 5:00. (143- 
147) 

CAMPER: 8 tool Spaeokratt truck camper wllh 
•to**, lc* box, walar tank, and gaa bottla 537- 
auoattar 5 30 p.m. (143-147) 



* New Homes for Sale 

* Used Homes for Sale 

* Financing Available 



WOODY'S MOBILE 
HOMESxALES 

2044 Turtle Creek Blvd 

Manhattan, Kansas 66902 

913-539-5621 



TRIUMPH TR4A, 1067, muat sail, a classic •por- 
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btua paint, took* good, run* graat, C1500 or 
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Bluamonl or 83SSSSS. (143-147) 

1S76 12x64 moblla homo, two badroom, un- 
fumtahad 538-5921, ftOO a.m -5fl0 p.m. (143- 
148) 

1974 14x70 mobtta noma, tnraa badroom. Vary 
nlc* 539-4621.0:00 am -SflOpm. (143-145) 

10S9 12x60 mobtl* noma, two badroom*, IVt 
bath*. 5304021 , 0O3 a m.-5«) p.m. (143-1 46) 

4 ET aluminum *k>1 whaata; 24.75x14. 2-7.50x14; 
106.776-1829.(143-148) 

1077 YELLOW Cmrry Mowa, ymyt top. loaded, ex- 
tra nlc*. CaM 1-4SS-2408 aftar 0.-00 p.m. (144- 
148) 



JUNIORS 

TOP SALE 

4 Days Only 

Wed. thru Sat 

Junior— Shirts, 
Blouses &. T-Shirts 
Many styles- 
good selection 

20% OFF 



LUCILLE'S 

Westloop 



USED GIBSON Lea Paul Custom Saa at String* 
n" Things. 814 N. 12th. Agglevllle. 530-2000. 
(144-180) 



14x60' SCHULT mObH* home, 1972. Two 
badroom*. Include*: tumltum, wearier, dryar, 
eliding g tSBO door . kl tchan bay w I ndow, storm 
window*, doubt* lobulation. Call 530*106 «! 
terSOOpm. (144-145) 

FWE STEMOflETTE dictating machln**, one 
portable atanonttte, mtacailanaou* ac- 
caaaorte*. Sell lo th* highest bidder. Bids 
close May 8, 1070, Can ba seen at Student 
Financial Ami stance, Fair child Hall, Room 
104. KSU Call 5324420. (144-140) 



1072 YAMAHA 650x52. 1500 mil** on overhaul 
Run* excellent. Good condition, mult Mil. 
tOOS. Call 5374341 (144-146) 

1067 CLASSIC Camera SS. 380/295 HP 22 MPG 

Maw exhaust and paint, air conditioned, 
power, dlM, tilt wtwel, fold down rui seat. 4- 
apeed with Poal-Trac. Much mora. 7764721. 
1144-146) 

1970 VOLKSWAGEN Bug. Good mechanical 
condition. Good gas mileage. Depandabl*. 
AM-FM 8 track. Call evening*. 537-4335. (144- 
1401 



SUBLEASE 

JUNE-JULY: nice, large one-bedroom, lumlihed 
apanmani. Air conditioned, full kitchen, 
balcony. Across street from campu* on hi. 
Manhattan Cat! 776-3206. (137-145) 

JUNE -JULY. 1 Vk badroom. furnished apartment, 
elr conditioned, three block* from campus 
Very reasonable. 532-3679 (t 34 144) 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom luxury apartment. 
CIom to camput/AgglevHIe DtihwMher, gar- 
bage disposal, laundry facilities, balcony. 
Rent negotiable. 537-2194. (130-148) 

1010 MANHATTAN across from J u si In Fur 
nlened, one large bedroom, air conditioning, 
dishwasher, balcony Price negotiable Call 
530-4611. Room 301. (140-144) 

FOR SUMMER, two badroom apartment, IVk 
bathroom*, right scross the street Irom canv 

pus Call 537-7840 tor Inlormalion (1*0-1*4) 

SPACIOUS TwO badroom apartment tor sum- 
mer -furnished. Mr, balcony, off-street 
parking, one block from Aheern. rent 
negotiable. Call 532 3631 (140-1401 

SUMMER-SPACIOUS four badroom houaa, 
two car gang*, 1 Vt bath*, partially luml»had. 
nlc* area. CaM Randy at 7740474 (1*0-146) 

FOR SUMMER: Two bedroom furnished luxury 
apartment, close to campus, central air. dish 
waahar, laundry lecfiitie*. No pats. Call 537 
1218.(1*0-149) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT 44. across from Aheern 
On* badroom, tumlshod, air conditioning For 
•arty lease and August, call 774-3704. (141- 
145) 

MAY 22nd— July 31. One bedroom air con- 
ditioned, tumlshod Wildcat apartment, two 
south side balconlM, across from Ahaam, 
8130 monthly. Call 5374831 . (141-148) 

SUMMER— AIR conditioned, laundry, acroaa 
from Aheern two-three people. Wildcat Inn Jr. 
1130.5374826.(141-145) 

SUMMER: SPACIOUS two badroom houM. 1f2 
block from campus and Agglevllle, good for 
three, furnlMtad or unfurnished, t145. Call 
Wad*. 530-5338 after 503. (141-145) 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom carpatad apartment, 

central air, dishwasher. CIom to campus Par- 
fact for IIum person* Available May 22. 537- 
0764.(141-146) 

SMALL APARTMENT tor one person tor sum- 
mer only. Furnished, elr conditioned, car- 
peted, modem. 185 par month, utilities paid. 
Call 537-4123, (142-140) 

AVAILABLE MAY 1, furnished room wllh access 
to entire house Also subleaM two furnished 
room* lor summer Cheap. 537-2601, Bruc* 
(142-146) 

SUMMER: ONE bedroom apartment across from 
Aheern, furnished, air conditioning. Call 778- 
3630,(142-146) 

FOR JUNE and July, one badroom good for two, 
f 100. Two bedroom good tor three, (150 Four 
bedroom, S200 Near campu*. Call 5374424 

(142-1511 

THREE BEDROOM houM, furnished, air con- 
ditioned, big yard, onfy two blocks from cam- 
pu*. negotiable. Available May 20. 537-1445. 
(142-148) 

NOW THROUGH July, spacious on* bedroom 
apartment Close lo city park. 175 month plus 
electricity Call 5304211. Alan, Room 017. 
LMvemeasag*. (142-144) 



Lindy's has purchased $1500 
worth of salesmen's sam- 
ples. Save 25-40% off retail. 

CHILDREN'S— sizes 3T-3, 6, 8, 10, 
12, 14, & 16. Includes jeans, tops, 
suits, and sportswear. 
LADIES'— various sizes includes 
jeans, all sportswear, and suits. 
MEN'S— shirts, all sportswear, 
and suits. Brand names include 
Hanes, Maverick, Lee, and 
Wrangler. 

$1500 SALE— 

Now going on at 

LINDY'S ARMY AND 

WESTERN WEAR. 

231 Poyntz 

Mon -Sat. 9:30-6:00 
Sun. 1:00-5:00 
Thurs.till8:30 



1974 CUTLASS Supreme— excellent condition. 
All extra*, good price, super clean. Call 530- 
5036 alter 5:30 (144-145) 

8x43 MOBILE home, skirted, washer, shed, on 
lot, good condition, $1800— Call between 
4:30400 p.m. - 778-5476 (144-148) 

USED BROTHER electric typewriter. Excellent 
condition (90 Call 5304427 (144-146) 



SUMMER: FURNISHED luxurious, 
badroom comfortable for three, 1/2 block from 
campus, negoilable prlcal Coachtamp, 1225 
Clatlln. Roxl, 5304411.0332.(142-148) 

SUMMER-FOUR badroom houM. Air con- 
ditioned, laundry, aaay access to campus, *n- 
closed yard, nice are*. Prtca negotiable Call 
Jeff or Jay, 5304423: Tom (103) or Chuck (101) 
al 5304211. (143-145) 

HEVI SUMMER: ttt bedroom, accommodate 
two-three people eMlly. great location near 
campu*, shag, cable, air conditioning, 
negotiable. Call 532-3787. (143-1471 

SUMMER— ONE badroom apartment aero** 
Irom campus. Two or three people. OWi- 
waahar, air conditioned, balcony. Call 774- 
4320 attar 500p.m. (143-147) 

SUMMER: IV* badroom. Air conditioned. CIom 
to campu*. 1212 Thurston. 537-2282. (143-147) 

AVAILABLE MAY 22. CIom 10 campu*. 
Si to/month. Carpeted, central air. cable TV. 
laundry facllltte*. CaH 837-2004. (143-148) 

AVAILABLE MAY 22. CloM to campu*. 
HKMnonth. Carpeted, central air, c*tM* TV, 
laundry lacllllle*. CaM 537-2004. (143-146) 

MAY 20%Juty 31. Fumtehad two badroom apart 
mant, eenlrel air. three beds, dHhwaahar, 
laundry feci lilies, reserved parking, cIom 
campua/Aggleviile. 530-7054. (143-147) 

NICE, ONE badroom lumished apartment. Wild- 
cat IV scross Irom Ahaam. tisormonth. Call 
5374718. (143-145) 

SUMMER— TWO bedroom lumished apartment. 
Hall block Irom campu*, air conditioning, 
waahar. 1 150 par month plus utilities, 1214 
Ratone. 5374300. (1 43-1 45) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT VI, across from Ahaam. 
One bedroom, central air. furnished, carpeted, 
laundry. Early occupancy avallabla. Onfy f 120 
monthly 7744944. (143-147) 

SUMMER: EXTRA targe luxury on* badroom 
apartment. CIom to campus and Agglevllle. 
Balcony, shag, central air. Rent negotiable. 

0*11537-4089.(144-148) 

HOUSE: FOUR bedroom, two baths, dish 
washer, carpeted. Iota ol windows, one block 
to campus, vary nk», WOO/monlh, 537-7213. 
(144-140) 

HOUSE: TWO bedroom, remodeled houM. 
Three block* from campus. Some furniture. 
Off-street parking. J200 plus utilities Call 774 
3702 or 7744090. (144-1 40) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT M. across from Ahaam, 
Nice one badroom. furnished apartment, air 
conditioning, two balconies S130fmonth. Call 
7784202. (144-148) 



FURNISHED AND carpeted apartment. Good tor 
one-ttwM people Convenient location. Call 
774-3408, rent negotiable (1*4-144) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT Sevan, 1*s block* horn 

campus On* bedroom, sir conditioned, fur- 
nished, carpatad. two balconies, laundry. S12S 
monthly Call 7740063 (144-146) 

HURRY, HURRYI HouM-one block Irom 
Agglevllle and 1/2 block to campus Nicety fur- 
nished, two bedrooms; two to four people, air 
conditioning, large yard and off -street 
parking. 537-7002. (144-140) 

SUMMER— SMALL one badroom fumlahed 
apartment, air conditioned, excellent location. 
ST tO/month. alt utllltkss paid. 537-7503. (144 
146) 

JUNE-JULY: lumished two-bedroom apartment 
lor three on North Manhattan Avenue. AH con- 
ditioned, carpatad. Call Tammy 435. Putnam 
Hill. (144-144) 

MONT BLUE duplex with all convenience* tor 
summer Two bedrooms, two baths, central 
Mr, clOM lo campu* Negotiable 5374064. 
(144-146) 

FOR SUMMER -luxurious two badroom apart- 
ment, fully lumished. air conditioning, dish 
waahar. CIom to campus. Rant negotiable. 
1010 Thurston. 5374473.(144-148) 

RENT ME I (June-July) Nifty two bedroom, Lurv 
dm Apartment* One block from Ahaam, 
Cottage Heights. Nicely tumlanad, modern 
kitchen, air conditioned, balcony. Rent 
negotiable CaH 5324134. (144-145) 

END MAY-July 31, Wildcat Inn, Jr., One 10 UWM 
persons Acroaa/Ahaam. Carpatad, fumlahed. 
ait conditioned, laundry. 1120 monthly. 537 
0252.1144-140) 

SUMMER-FOUR bedroom duptax, 070 par par- 
eon. Air conditioning, mahwasner, two 

bathroom*. Utilities paid, Iw 
campu*. 779-3428 (144-144) 



NOTICES 

MANHATTAN PAWN Shop, 317 S. 4th Street. 
776-6112 — ataraoa, fl-track*. TV'*, 
typewriter*, guitars, camera*. Buy seti-trad* 
(211) 

CUSTOM MADE 1 4 kl, gold wedding band* Wln- 
dtire Jewelry, 230 N. 3rd, Manhattan. (1 IBM) 

STEREO REPAIR-lMt, reaaonabta competent 
repair ot most brand*. Over 300 replacement 
needles In slock The Circuit Shop, through 
the Record Store 7741221.(12111) 

FOR THOSE ot you who have always wondered 
but never tried natural wholesome food*, be 
our guests at Deity* Daughter— a natural 
food* restaurant. Open Mon.-Sat. 1100 a.m.- 
(KM p.m. 300 N. 3rd. (140-144) 

SLEEP, THE conqueror with a sigh. Swap, the 
dryer ot the crying eye. Sleep, the torgetter, 
Sleep, the creation, on your waterbed Irom 
Rush Street Station, 617 N. Washington, J.C. 
or Rush Street Exchange, Aggtevlll*. Manhat- 
tan. (141-144) 

JOANNE'S ALTERATIONS and Tailoring tor 
man's and ladles'. Professional quality and 
service, with very reasonable prices PlaaM c- 
all 5304455. (141-145) 

MULTI-FAMILY garage ule. 410 Edgerton. 
Pioneer stereo system. Wuher-dryer corn- 
bin*! km, onyx ch*»* Mt, typewriter, antique 
cookware. tools, book*, ate. Rain or shine. 
April 20 *nd 30,000300 p.m. (143-145) 

EUROPE 

Less than Vi Economy Fare 
Guaranteed Reservations Call toll 
free 800-325-4867 or see your travel 
agent Uni Travel Charters 



WEST HALL CarwMh— Saturday. April 20, 1.00- 
500 p.m. at Union National Bank downtown. 
* tOO per car . Be thereto 44- 145) 

ALVAREZ guitars offer* you a aavlng of 
606.66 on accessories and services when you 
purchase one ot their line *cou sties Your 
local dMler la Strings n Things, 614 N. 12th, 
Aggtavllle. 539-2009. 44-150) 

FIFTH ANNUAL MuHlpl* Scktroele Benefit Bar 
becue Sponaored by Alpha Gamma Rho and 
Clovia 4-H Houm Sunday. April 30, 4:00-7:00 
p.m., Weber Halt Lawn, live entertainment. 
Adult* -12.00, ChiMrart-11 40. (144) 

TRAPPERS — KANSAS Fur Harva*t*r 

Association meeting. Saturday, April 20. 1100 
a.m. Science Building, Emporia Slate U river- 
ally. More information, Dennis. 532-5437. (144 
145) 



SERVICES 

RESUMES TYPESET, designed and printed by 
proles slo nets get reeull*. 100 Impressions 
817. The Offfwt PreM P^nls anything. 770- 
I 317 Houston (23tf| 



RESUMES WRITTEN Irom scratch by 

professional writer*. Your reeum* is written, 
designed, typaaet, printed. 100 coptearS25. 

537 7668 (134155) 



ATTENTION VW owner*— we are now open 
Monday through Saturday tor your con- 
venience J 4 L Bug Service. 1404-2388. St. 
George. (134-1 45) 

EXPERIENCED LAWN clean-up and main 
tanance. Vary competittv* prices. Call Marvin 
at 770-0301 or 537 7606, both after 500 p.m. 
(141-145) 

PIANO INSTRUCTION 

Now is the time to schedule piano 
lessons with Kurt Werner. Mr. 
Werner is a graduate of KSU and 
the Manhattan School of Music 
NYC. He has studied with 
Margaret Walker, Charles Strat- 
um, Robert Goldsand and Jeanne 
Dowis. Phone 537-4924. 



HART TRANSFER and Storage loves your 
moves. And, we love your storage loo. lor lhal 
matter. If wa can be of service lo you. pleau 
call— we have some of tha lowest rates 
available for over**** shipping, domestic 
moving, and tor warehouse storage. Our 
trained staff ol professions! movers can make 
all arrangements for your move, saving you 
time, money, and worry. Gall Diane for rales at 
7764633 From Hart ol America to Anywhere 
In the World. (144) 

(Continued on page 19) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurs, April 27, 1 978 



18 



^ 



(Continued from page 18) 

VW BUG tune-up only 117.60 lor 1962-74 beetle 
without air conditioning (Add S3.50 tor air 
conditioning), j&l Bug Service, 1 484-2388. 
Si Georfle (141-145J 

LET MV fingers do the typing I Thesis, report a, 
resumes Faat service/experienced typist 
June, 532-6980 or 539-2424 [1 42-1 46) 



SOUPENE'S 
COMPUTER 
ALIGNMENT 



114 South 5th 



776-8054 



NEED HELP In Economlca? Call 5374374 Ratea 
baaed on a multidimensional concept ot 
utility. (144-145) 



ATTENTION 



KATER'S DRIVING School tatting application 
now. For Information call Key Inc . Manhattan, 
KS, 537-6330. (109-155) 



LOST 



MAN'S WEDDING ring— Friday morning In the 
Union 537-9687 Reward (142 144) 

TIPTON HIGH School, 1977 graduation dog. 
Starting silver, dark blue atone. Initialed S.A 
Call Steve, 5394211, Room 733, reward. (142- 
144) 

REWARD OFFERED for return ol Tl calculator 
SR-50 with black case Loal In 219 Cahrln Mon 
day Call Marc B-49, 5395301 (143-146) 

GLASSES SATURDAY on bedrace panda route. 
Call 539*211, Room SIS, ask tor Phil. (14* 

145) 

MONDAY NWHT, large grey cat with black 
etrlpee. Near Aggievllle Need* ehole 
Reward, call 537-4200 avenlnga, or leave word 

ii930Lsrsmle.(144 145) 

REWARD SILVER tabby Persian cat. In vicinity 
ol 10th and Laramie, Tueadey morning. It 
found, pleaae call Karen, 532-6061 or 5374280 
after 4:00 pm (144-1 46) 

SONY CASSETTE tape player (compect-lypa) on 
Friday, April 21. Probably In Alien 1 20 or Car- 
dwell 101. Ms more* tape on Microbiology 
date* 4-21 in It. Reward. Pleaae call Jennie, 
539461 1, room 330. (144.148) 



FOUND 

A RACQUET-beli racquet and blue Jacket by 
Washburn Courts on Saturday night 532-5353. 
aak for Mary. (142-144) 

KEYS IN Kedzle 103, April 25. (1 43-145) 

NEW BOTTLE ot lens cleaner led In KedUe 103. 
Come In and claim. (143-145) 



PERSONAL 



ARTIE: WHAT would we do without our father, 
maid, chauffeur, counselor and Irlend. We 
love you I T he Campu a Foxee , (1 44) 

BERT— IT'S been a great four weeka. Let's do It 
over And over, Andover. No sleeping 1 1 Bert. 
(1*4) 

TO THE Pussycats ot AGR, We love you. «tt. 

(1*4) 



THE TWELFTH commandment — Thou ihalt not 
provoke a nin)aio anger. S W. (143-147) 

JASON AND Rock: Our cameras we will pack. 
We'll see you at the track; speed you will not 
lack. All the practice will be worthwhile. You 
could run the mile, and aim not lose your 
smile. After your victory you'll deserve a beer. 
with your theta girls near. (144) 

WENDY— A special thanks to you for making a 
lantaatlc 2 1st lor me Lei's always keep these 
memories we share and continue to make 
more. Dave. (144) 

WILL, CINDY, Sieve, Rick, Mike- Thanks tor a 
wild and crery 21st. Dave. (144) 

SUNSHINE KID, how about picking me up at 
5:40 p.m. on Friday'? Keep on shining. See you 
then, Glenoa. (144) 

TO THE women ot Clovia: Maybe not so much of 
a surprise, bul I'm Installing my first addition 
MS. (144) 



PEANUTS 



LOOK, ALL I WANT 
(5 A LITTLE 
IN51PE INFORMATION. 



TO MY Girl Friday. The ease with which we com- 
municate telle, me this must be fate. Our alfalr 
will last forever and A Friday Love, the 
Charisma Kid. (144) 

TO OUR Fl|ls, Tom, Doc. Mike and Clement: We 
love you guys yes we do, yes we do, we love 
you truly! We love your sausage and eggs and 
your bubbly champaigns and your burnt 
potatoes tool We'd eel it all (chomp, chomp, 
chomp, chomp) if you ask us to. Lowe. Ma re la. 
Kris, Reed, and Cush, (1 44) 

RHONDA OF the Kearney party Saturday, green 
Gremlin Monday I don't go near Justin How 
can I reach you? Call 539-5301, Ext 204, 
George. (144) 



WANTED 



TO BUY: Playboys, Playglrla. Penthouse, Out, 
Gallery and others. Comics, paperbacks. 
coins, stamps, ml Maria, antiques. Treasure 
Cheat, Agglevilla-Old Town Mall. (129-155) 

WANTED. DEAD or alive— VWs needing 
repairs, lo buy. VW Rabbit or Scirroco, loo. 
Call 1494-2386 anytime. (131-145) 

TYPING WANTED. Highest quality work; editing 
optional; extra-large type aval labia If wanted 
for speeches, visually impaired. 5394676. 
5:00*00 pm (142-149) 

MARRIED COUPLE need ride to Norton April 29. 
WIN help pay gaa. Call Hllmar Bonn at 778- 
1049 after SflOpm (143-145) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

SUMMER/FALL, females to share large fur- 
niahed houae, private bedrooms, more. M0 
and up Most bills paid 1005 Vattie* and 1 122 
Vsttier 53*6401.(121150) 

AVAILABLE MAY 1 1ll tall semester STO Bftej ap- 
proximately IS utilities Own bedroom, fur- 
rrietwd, non-smoker Close. Call Patty, 539 

3156 (138-147) 

FEMALE TO share comfortable furnished apart 
ment. One gal to join two others. Private 
room, air conditioning, SKI, utntllee paid. Cell 
539-2663 or 7760710(140-149) 

ONE FEMALE to Join three others In spacious 
apartment, main floor of large home, for sum- 
mer. Close to campus, 175. utilities paid. Call 
539-2663 or 5394329, (140-149) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share Wildcat Inn apar- 
tment tor summer Call Pain, 7760400. (141- 
145) 

GRADUATE MALE to share two-bedroom apart- 
ment starting June 1. Set) plus 1(2 utilities 
Call Tom, 5394497. (142-144) 

FEMALE TO share nice, furnished apartment for 
summer with two girts. Two blocks from cam- 
pus. 967 plus electricity Call 5324364. (143- 
147) 

FOR SUMMER: 170 month plus hall utilities 
Centrally located, between Aggievllle, park, 
and University. Call Chris Biggs. 53S4S27 af- 
ter 5^0. (143-145) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE wanled (Or Summer and 

fall. One block from campus and Aggievllle. 
Call 5394901. (143-146) 

HELP: NEED two people to live in four bedroom 
house two blocks east ol Ford. For June and 
July. Washer, dryer, dishwasher, ot I street 
parking. Call 77*9507 or 5374327. (144-146) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share furnlehed one 
bedroom apartment, May 20th- August 23, 
SSSrmonth plus utilities, 1858 Clallln #7, 539- 
6704. (144-148) 



WELCOME 



ON THURSDAY afternoons, a one-half 
celebration of Holy Communion al 4:30 p.m. In 
Danforth Chapel Open to all, sponsored by 
the First Presbyterian Church. (144) 



HELP WANTED 



OVERSEAS JOBS— Summer/year round. 
Europe, S. America, Australia, Asia. elc. All 
Holds, 150041200 monthly, expenses paid, 
sightseeing Free Information. Write: BHP 
Co., Box 4490. Dept KB, Berkeley, CA 94704 
(I2S-147) 

COMBINE/TRUCK operators lor custom harvest 
June 5 July 10. Excellent hourly wage ptua 
board and room. Late model equipment 
Possible all summer employment. 316-257- 
2759 Lee Scheuller, Sterling. KS 67579. (142- 
146) 

DRUMMER FOR rock group Steady work after 
June 15. Serious Inquiries only Call Randy. 
537-7738 alter 500 pm. (143-147) 



AGQIE STATION Is taking applications for 
wallrssses or wallers and kitchen personnel. 
Apply in person— 1115 More, after 2:00 p.m. 
(140-145) 

SUMMER OPPORTUNITY One of the Midwest's 
oldest moving and storage firms now ac- 
cepting applications for household-goods 
packers. A part-time— lull- lime summer Job, 
full days required. Apply In person at 12905 
West 63rd Street, Shawnee. KS or call 1-631- 
1440. An equal opportunity employer. (141- 
146) 

SUMMER OPPORTUNITY One of the Midwest's 
oldest moving end storage firms now ac- 
cepting applications (or summer em- 
ployment. Long hours and hard work required. 
Looking for household-goods movers and 
helpers. Must be 1B. Driving experience help- 
ful but not required. Apply In person at 12906 
Wast 63rd Street. Shswnee. KS An equal op- 
portunity employer. (141145) 

K4TATE UNION Is taking applications for 
secretarial assistant for the 1978-79 academic 
year. Five-ten hours s week. Minimum wage. 
Apply Union Activities Center. April 24 
through 26th An equal opportunity employer. 
0800. (1*2-145) 



LPN'S-RN'S 

3:00 p.m. 11:00 p.m. 

11:00-7:00 a.m. 

shifts 

Full and Part-time 

Positions Available 

Generous Salaries 

Apply in person 

College Hill Skilled 
Nursing Center 

2423 Kimball 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

WAITRESSES OR waiters and bartenders. Call 
5394753 after 12*0 noon. (143-1 50) 

BROTHER'S TAVERN. Doorperaon, floor- 
walkers and bartenders for the summer. Apply 
In person at Brother's. (144145) 

STUDENTS. WOULD you be Interested in a part- 
time business that can provide an unlimited 
income and financial Independence? Would It 
be worth an hour of your lima to took at our 
programs? If interested, call 776-1 BBS for an 
appointment. (144-145) 

TUTORS I THE KS U. Special Services Program 
ia currently seeking tutors for next fail. Rate 
of pay: W.SOfrtour for group tutors; S2.75mour 
for Individual tutors. Qualifications: 3.0 G PA. 
In subject area, dependable, courteous, and 
ability to communicate with others of various 
backgrounds. II Interested, attend group in- 
terview In K-State Union, Room 206-A, 
Tuesday. May 2nd, 4:00 p.m.— or— Wed- 
nesday. May 3rd, 11:00 a.m., Room 206-A For 
more details, call 5324439 Kansas State 
University Is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative 
Action Employer. (144-146) 



BARTENDER PART time 
Hamad* Inn. Apply in 

(144148) 



Bookers II, 
at Office 525. 



FOR RENT 



TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electrics and manuals; 
day. week or month Buzzetls. 511 Leaven- 
worth, across from post office Call 7744469 
(IK, 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS; excellent eelecHon. 
Hull Business Machines. 1212 Mora, 539-7931 . 
Service most makes ol typewriters. Also Vic- 
tor and Olivetti adders, (lit) 



ONE, TWO. three bedroom furnished, un- 
furnished apartments tor eummerrlall, 10 or 12 
month contracts No pets 5374389. (119tf) 

YEAR LEASE— one block from campus, two 
bedroom, maximum tour, deposit. fUSOJmon- 
th, 5394005. (140-144) 

LARGE, NICE, furnished apartment. Three 
males Private. Perking. Reasonable. Knotty 
pine walla. Large bedroom, single bads. For 
fall. 7764897.(140-149) 

NEW THREE bedroom duplex, IVk bathe, kit- 
chen epp I lances, family room, 1 1 replace, can 
Ira) air, gaa heat, 1325 monthly. 7760982 
evenings. (141-144) 

SPACIOUS AND sunny three bedroom apart- 
ment in home. Need one-lwo lemale room 
males for fall 1978 S70 includes water and 
heat. Call 7 764096 evenings. (142-145) 



JUNE AND July only. Two bedroom furnished 
luxury apartments near Aggievllle. No pels. 
Three or lour single students $150 Call Rich 
after 5:00 p.m. 776-1 486 (1 33-146) 

A BEAUTIFUL large tour bedroom furnished 
apartment with a large screen porch near cam 
pus. Good for tour-six. Water, trash and 
heating bills paid . No pets. Call 537-0428. (136- 
145) 

FURNISHED, AIR conditioned, carpeted, one 
end two bedroom apartments near campus, 
reasonable rent tor summer — fall . Afternoons 
5344904.(134145) 

A BEAUTIFUL carpeted two bedroom I urn I shed 
apartment near campus, good for three, $220 
One bedroom good tor two, f 156. Water, trash 
and healing bills paid. No pate. Call 537-042B. 
(134145) 

TWO BEDROOM Prairie Glen Townhouse. Un- 
furnished with kitchen appliances Available 
around June let. 9141 . 7764066 after 500 p.m. 
(144144) 

BEAUTIFUL THREE-bedroom apartment, live 
mlnutse walk from campus. Furnished. 
Garage. Summer only. 7744499. (144144) 



SUNSET 
APARTMENTS 

1024 Sunset 
1978-79 School year 

one bedroom furnished 
year lease from $150.00 
2 blocks from campus 

53&-5051 u-9 P .m.) 



LOWER LEVEL of a bllevel by Turtle: bedroom, 
bathroom, kitchen, study: call 5394483. (142- 
144) 

WE NEED two to share comfortable 6 bedroom 
home with three others. Separated living 
slluetlon or not. 1355 monthly. 7743757. (143- 
1*4) 



PARKVIEW 

Student Housing 

Osage and nth St. 

Near Campus 

Near Aggieville 

• furnished 

• free parking 

• equipped kitchen 

• laundromat 

• $55 and up 

Reserve now for 

summer and fall 

Phone 537-4233 



2216 BLAKER Street— Available June 1. Two 
bedroom home. 6230rmonth, plus utilities. 
WIN accommodate two or three student a 
nicely. Call lor appointment 537-2002 (143- 
149) 



SUMMER RENTALS 

ROYAL TOWERS 
APTS. 

Two Bedrooms 
$135.00 a month 

Air Conditioning 

All Utilities Paid 

including Cable TV 

Contract June 1 —July 31 

$150.00 Deposit 

Call 5394851 or 539-9510 

5:00 p.m.— 7:00 p.m. 



1015 BLUE MONT -available June 1. Five 
bedroom home Win accommodate five men 
or five women Call 537-2002 for appointment. 
(143-145) 



by Charles Shultz 




FOR INSTANCE, WHAT 
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ABOUT ALL DM? 




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EFFICIENCY APARTMENT, available August 1 , 
close lo campus, S125fmontti, Call after 7:00 
p.m. 537*591 (143- MO) 

CALL 775-5353. Apartment lor one or two. Air 
conditioned. Rent negotiable Good deal. (143- 
145) 



RAINTREEAPT. 

2 bdrm furnished 
carpeted & draped 

close to campus 

dishwasher, no pets 

or children 

$300 per month 

Summer or Fall leases 

Call 537-4567 or 

539-1201 



NOW LEASING luxury studio apartments One 
block eaat of campus Available June 1 and 
August 1. Mont Blue Apartments 530-4447 
(144-141, 



Low as $120 a Month 

Wildcat Inn Apts. 

For 

June and July 

Summer School 

FHirnished— 

Air Conditioning 

WE HAVE 
LIMITED A VAILABILITY 

For More Information 
Call 

CELESTE 

539-5001 



NEW THREE bedroom apartments. Un- 
furnished, (300/month plus utilities. Air con- 
dltlonlno, carpel. 539-1802 (144-1*8) 

FOUR BEDROOM houae, two story, one block 
from campus For six persons. 175 per person. 
Available June 1st. 5374548 (144-140) 



GOLD KEY 
APARTMENTS 

New deluxe 2 Bedroom— Modern 
Furniture— Garbage Disposal- 
Dishwasher— Shag Carpeted with 
Drapes. Close to City Park, Tennis 
Courts, Campus and Aggieville (3 
blocks). 

$245— $275— $300 
for students 

1417—1419 Leavenworth 

Leasing for Fall and one im- 
mediately. 



ATTRACTIVE HOME In excellent neighborhood. 
Four bedrooms, family room, air conditioning, 
carpeting, fenced yard, carport. 1325. 
Available May 15 for family or mature studen- 
ts 53M202. (144-148) 

COUPLE, FIRST floor ot house. Two bedroom, 
close to campus, garden space, garage. Un- 
furnished. Cell 537 7881 alter 5:00 p.m. (144- 



NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 
from $165 

* FREE shutUe service 

toKSU 

* portion of utilities paid 

* adjacent to Westloop 

Shopping Center 

Phone 
HMKI 

or see at 
1413 Cambridge Place 



PRIVATE ROOMS, efltctency apartments 
available now and June first Close to cam- 
pus 537-2344 or evenings 775-5638 (1 44-1 48) 

SUMMER: CLOSE to campus. Aggievllle. 

Balcony, carpeted, central air, furnished, one 
and one-half bedroom apartment. 
Reasonable. Call 5374725. (144-148) 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
TOPtKA, KS 6 CGI 2 EXCH 



Kansas State 

Collegian 

Scaffold fall 
claims 51 lives 

ST. MARYS, W.Va. (AP)— Fifty-one construction workers plunged 
screaming to their deaths Thursday when a scaffold inside a power 
company cooling tower collapsed and crashed 168 feet to the ground. 
Eight of the victims were members of one family. 

"They knew what was happening, but there wasn't anything they could 
do about it," said one witness. 

"They just fell like dominoes," said another. "I looked up and men 
were screaming and hollering." 

Many of the nearly 1,000 other construction workers at the Pleasants 
Power Station site rushed to the base of the huge cylindrical concrete 
tower and began clawing at the twisted mass of steel and rubble in a vain 
effort to rescue their co-workers. State police said all 51 men who were 
atop the metal scaffold died. 

"There was so much stuff thereon the ground that you couldn't see the 
bodies," said Bill Hess, a 22-year-old laborer. "There wasn't a sound 
coming from it. They were torn up so bad, I couldn't teD looking at them 
whether any of my friends had been killed." 

A LOCAL fire station was pressed into service as a temporary morgue 
where relatives came to identify the dead. 

West Virginia Gov. Jay Rockefeller extended his "deepest sympathy" 
to the families of the victims and said: "Tragedies of this magnitude are 
difficult to understand and even more difficult to accept." 

Rockefeller's office said it was the worst non-coal mine construction 
accident in state history and possibly in U.S. history. 

A spokesman for the International Union of Operating Engineers in 
Charleston said the scaffold was the kind known as a "slip form" 
because it hangs over the top of forms into which concrete is poured. The 
forms, and the attached scaffold, are continuously moved higher as the 
tower's height is increased. - - 

The tower was one of two at the plant The first had been completed. 

Monongahela Power said the structure was about one-third completed. 
A spokesman said the diameter at the base was 360 feet and the tower 
was to be 430 feet tall when finished. 

IN WASHINGTON, a spokesman for the Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration said 13 inspections of the Pleasants Power Station 
site since 1973 had revealed "numerous violations, both serious and 
nonserious," but he said he did not know what they were. 

FBI investigation blocked 
by Bell, Justice aide says 



Friday 



r 



Inside 



WASHINGTON (AP)-Attomey 
General Griffin Bell undermined 
the Justice Department's in- 
vestigation of the FBI and blocked 
possible indictments against eight 
middle-level FBI officials, the 
man who headed the probe said 
Thursday. 

William Gardner told a Senate 
appropriations subcommittee that 
Bell effectively halted the probe 
by refusing to let prosecutors seek 
perjury indictments against an 
unspecified number of FBI of- 
ficials whom the task force 
believed were lying. 



Without the threat of perjury 
charges, Gardner said, his task 
force had no leverage with which 
to force agents to tell the truth 
about allegedly illegal FBI ac- 
tivities. 

Gardner said Bell also refused to 
let prosecutors seek indictments of 
eight mid-level officials on 
charges of wiretapping, mail theft, 
break-ins or black bag jobs, 
perjury and false statements to a 
government agency. 

He said the officials, some of 
whom still work for the FBI, in- 
cluded three squad leaders. 



April 28, 1978 
Kansas State University, 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 84 No. 145 



HOWDY! W *mey be tfteudy todby, but we might (have werfn 
temperature* t* make It mere beerabl*. Details, p. 3... 

WHO 1$ Matt Betton end why Is hi pushing fazz at K-State? Fir 
answers, see q. t... 

STEVE WALTON, a l&Stete junior In prelaw, has made th* moel 
o* • gift *f speech, p. IB*.. 




Close call 



Photo by PteeSouia 



Christa Smyth looks on in disbelief at the result of a collision between a car driven 
by her son Mark, sophomore fn nuclear engineering, and a trailor truck. The 
accident occurred Thursday night on K-t8 when the driver of the truck attempted 
a U-turn and Smyth rammed into the rear of the truck. No injuries were reported. 



Friedman: Free trade and no tariffs 




MILTON FRIEDMAN 



BY GRANT SANBORN 
Collegian Reporter 

Advocating free trade for 
American goods and services, 
Nobel Prize-Winning economist 
Milton Friedman said in a Landon 
Lecture Thursday that the United 
States should act like the great 
country it is and eliminate all 
import tariffs and restrictions. 

The way to rid the country of 
inflation would be to remove 
barriers and restrictions on free 
trade, Friedman said before an 
audience of 1,700 at McCain 
Auditorium. 

"In the name of both prosperity 
and world peace, there are few 
moves we could make that would 
contribute more than a movement 



toward free trade," Friedman 
said. 

Friedman criticized import 
tariffs, saying they were a cause of 
inflation. The visible effects of 
tariffs were good, according to 
Friedman, because they reduced 
the competition between domestic 
and foreign producers. 

However, Friedman added the 
invisible effects of import tariffs 
are bad. They drive up the prices 
of imported goods and give the 
foreign consumer less money to 
spend in America , he said. 

"We call a tariff a protective 
measure. It does protect the 
consumer against one 
thing— lower prices," Friedman 
said. 



The economist used the import 
of Japanese steel as an example, 
claiming that the American steel 
industry uses national defense as 
an excuse for restricting the 
import of Japanese steel . 

The American steel industries 
do not furnish estimates of what 
the costs of national defense are, 
he said. 

Friedman said we should fight 
inflation by removing all the 
barriers and restrictions on free 
trade. He suggested eliminating 20 
percent of the import tariffs per 
year over a five-year period. 

Friedman, a columnist and 
contributing editor for Newsweek, 
said if his solution to inflation were 
instituted, the value of the 



American dollar would stablize on 
the foreign market. 

"If we take care of inflation at 
home, the vaule of the dollar on the 
foreign exchange will balance," he 
said. 

Friedman denounced price 
supports for farmers, claiming 
that farmers were not com- 
plaining when the price of 
agricultural goods was unusually 
high. 

"The movement to farm-price 
supports is a very short-sighted 
movement which can only have 
two effects. One is destroying 
foreign markets and the other is 
the government subsidizing far- 
mers," he said. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fit, April 28, 1978 



Disease not considered severe 



Lafene reports large number of measle cases 



BY CAROL HOLSTEAD 
Collegian Reporter 

There have been a large number of cases of the measles 
reported in the last few weeks, according to Lafene Student 
Health Center. 

"There have probably been around 75 to 100 cases of the 
measles in the last month," said Dr. D.E. McCoy, 
physician at Lafene 

"It's not a severe disease. We try to isolate the disease to 
keep it away from other students," he said. "It doesn't 
require any medication, but we felt it was necessary to 
inform students of the symptoms." 

MEASLES, commonly referred to as German measles, 
three day measles or rubella, is a viral infection occuring 



in children and adults. This disease is characterized by 
little or no advanced warning. It may take anywhere from 
a week to three weeks for symptoms to show. 

There may be a low temperature for two or three days, 
some degree of headache, slight cough, some mild throat 
discomfort, and at times, an irritation of the eyes prior to 
the rash. 

There is also, commonly, the development of enlarged 
lymph glands in the neck, specifically the back of the neck 
and behind the ears. 

The rash usually begins on the face, neck and chest and 
gradually spreads to other parts of the body. The rash is 
characterized by small red spots, varying in size from pin- 
head to considerably large. 



IT IS thought that measles can occur only once in a 
person's life. However, it is quite common for a person to 
get them more than once during childhood or young 
adulthood. 

This infection is generally very mild and doesn't make 
people particularly ill and there are little or no com- 
plications. 

Although complications are rare, occasionally a person 
may develop soreness of the joints with some minimal 
amount of swelling of the hands, fingers and feet 

No medication is generally necessary other than aspirin 
to relieve some of the aching. 



Collegian editor apologizes 
for Student Senate column 



By THE SG A STAFF 

Collegian Editor Chris Williams 
apologized to Student Senate last 
night for calling senate meetings 
"cheap entertainment" in an 
editorial column April 20. 

Williams told the senators he 
wrote the column after a senate 
debate on the quality of the 
Collegian during an April 18 
tentative allocation meeting in 
which the budget for Student 
Publications was considered. 

"I wrote it tongue-in-cheek, 
garnished with a little bit of 
anger," Williams said. 

Williams also apologized to 
Brian Rassette, business senator, 
who was the only senator criticzed 
by name in the column. Williams 



said his criticism of Rassette was 
"in poor taste," 

Rassette accepted the apology 
and said he hoped the Collegian 
and senate would be on close 
terms because "one cannot sur- 
vive without the other." 

After stating his apologies, 
Williams aanswered senator's 
questions regarding the content of 
the Collegian and the coverage of 
campus events by the paper. 

Williams said all campus events 
are not covered by the Collegian 
due to space limitations in the 
paper. Priority decisions regar- 
ding the newsworthiness of stories 
are made when the Collegian is 
printed, he said. 

DURING committee reports, it 



City narrows number 
of manager candidates 

BY DAVE HUGHES 

City Editor 

Manhattan's city commissioners met Thursday in executive session to 
narrow down the number candidates for the city manager position. 

This commissioners have been searching since January for a suc- 
cessor to Les Rieger, who resigned his position as city manager to take 
the job as city's finanical director, 

Manhattan Mayor Robert Linder said the number of candidates was 
narrowed down from »ix to "two or three". 

In the interviews Linder said he could not elaborate on the subjects of 
discussion but that they took in a wide range of issues concerning the 
work of a city manager. 

A total of 72 persons applied for the position. Of that 72 only one of was 
a women Ads for the position were published in the International City 
Managers Association Journal, the Kansas State Journal, the Kansas 
City Times and the New York Times. 



was announced that a special task 
force to investigate the possibility 
of the construction of a new 
fieldhouse at K-State would meet 
for the first time Wednesday. 

The fieldhouse task force will 
gather information about con- 
struction possibilities, funding 
sources and possible sites for a 
new fieldhouse, according to Sam 
Brownback, student body 
president and organizer of the task 
force. 

Members of the force 
representing groups interested In 
fieldhouse construction are 
Rassette of the student body, Dan 
Beatty for the University ad- 
ministration, Terry Glasscock for 
the city, Fred Maryanski, for the 
faculty, Bones Nay for the athletic 
department, Bemie Butler for the 
alumni and Gene Cross of 
University Facilities. 

"I can eventually see and almost 
predict that there will be another 
referendum in February facing 
the students." Rassette said. 




K-State 
this weekend 



UNITED BLACK VOICES will present its end of the year concert 
Sunday at 3 p. m. in the Union Little Theater. 



Get On The 



TGIF 
EXPRESS! 

(tiU7:00> 

• HAPPY 
HOUR 
PRICES 

• D. J. 

• FREE EATS 



; 



5th Annual 



MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS 

BENEFIT BARBEQUE 

SUNDAY, APRIL 30, 4-7 P.M. 

WEBER HALL LAWN 



vl 



LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 

ADULTS '2.00 CHILDREH '1.50 



/ 



Sponsored by Alpha Gamma Kho and i'tovia 4-H House 



Every Sunday 5 to 8 p.m. 

Cotton's 

SPAGHETTI 

BUFFET 



All you can eat 
ONLY $2.25 

with salad plate— $2.75 
large salad plate alone — f 1.50 




QofohL P&bhtO&Oh, I7 fhTA d „ a d 



Inn 

Anderson 



^3- 



X. 



A little bird just told us that 

IT'S GREAT 

and there's still a place for you! 




UPC Chairperson positions on the following com- 
mittees are open. 

Arts Committee — Ann Gates, Coordinator 776-1957 

The Publicity Chairperson will be in charge of making sure the advertising 

and publicity for the gallery, arts & crafts show, print sales and art rentals, 

as well as any special events, are prepared and given to the respective 

media. 

The showcase Chairperson will coordinate the showcase on the second floor 

of the K-State Union. This will include scheduling the displays and setting 

them up in the showcase. 

The Print Sales/Arts Rental Chairperson will be in charge of Art Rentals 

and returns at the beginning and end of each semester and one print sale per 

semester. 

The Arts & Crafts Fair/Special Events Chairperson will be in charge of 

coordinating the Arts & Crafts Fair and any special events the committee 

chooses to present 

These positions will require approximately 5-10 hours per week as well as 

additional time when shows are being set up or discussed. 

Coffeehouse Committee— Ken Spangler, Coordinator 776-7194 
The Technical Chairperson should be able to communicate with others suc- 
cessfully and be able to teach others the mechanics involved in setting up 
and operating the sound and light systems. It is important that this person 
find out what kind of special arrangements are required by the performers 

Concerts Committee — Myron Mofcen, Coordinator 776-7194 
The Promotions Chairperson shall be responsible for outlining all PR cam- 
paigns. They shall also serve as a liason to the Promotions Committee and 
will be expected to attend all promotions meetings. This person should 
possess a good working knowledge of PR techniques and will be responsible 
for teaching said techniques to the rest of the concerts committee 

Travel Committee — Carol Peckman, Coordinator 539- 1865 
The Trip Chairperson position requires a willingness to assume respon- 
sibility, set and meet deadlines, and handle the literally hundreds of details 
demanded in working with the professional travel industry The successful 
execution of a tour demands careful attention to every detail of the trip 
arrangements Familiarity and interest with program planning and travel 
planning specifically, is an asset. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT any of the above listed coor- 
dinators or come up to the Activities Center on the third floor of the K-State 
Union (532-6571). Applications are available now in the Activities Center 

Deadline for application is today 



at 5 p.m. 



(M IT'S GREAT 



t (Kir. MM 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frt, April 28, 1878 





Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

Million-dollar minutes 

STOCKHOLM, Sweden— The world is spending 
almost $1 million a minute on arms, 20 times more 
than industrialized nations spend to help poorer 
countries, the Stockholm International Peace 
Research Institute said Thursday. 

Current worldwide military expenditures total 
$400 billion and "with the current rate, it will top $1 
trillion by the end of the century," SIPRI Chair- 
man Frank Barnaby said in releasing the group's 
1978 edition of "World Armaments and Disar- 
mament." 

Barnaby, who is British, said worldwide 
military spending is twice as high as the yearly 
gross domestic product of the whole of Africa, 
about the same amount as the gross domestic 
product of all Latin America and 20 times more 
than the total annual development assistance 
given by industrialized nations to the developing 
world. 

Twenty -five percent oft 

WASHINGTON— The President's Commission 
on Mental Health said Thursday it found that 25 
percent of Americans suffer from mental 
problems and proposed a $600 million program of 
treatment and prevention. 

In a report presented to President Carter, the 20- 
member commission said the program should 
focus particularly on upgrading services for the 
elderly, children, minorities and those with 
chronic mental illness. 

The commission report expressed hope that 
people someday will be "as willing to use mental 
health services as they are to use the emergency 
room in the local hospital" and urged making such 
services available at "reasonable cost." 

The suggestions vary from providing maternal 
care to prevent mental problems in children to 
changing the Medicare and Medicaid programs so 
that they reimburse patients who seek help for 
mental illness. 

Waste and inefficiency 

WASHINGTON— President Carter was told 
Thursday that the government spends at least $500 
million a year on audio- visual activities marked by 
"waste and questionable procedures." 

The White House released a year-long study that 
Carter had ordered in an effort to search for 
federal waste and inefficiency. 

The study, which itself cost $82,000, concludes 
that the government's production of films, 
videotapes and slides, television spots, radio 
recordings and film strips costs enough to run the 
State Department for six months. 

Stated another way, the government's film- 
making activities cost the taxpayers more money 
than would be spent under the proposed fiscal 1979 
budget for the entire foreign military aid program. 

Equal opportunity offensiveness 

KANSAS CITY, Mo.— Recent dismantling of a 
Nazi Germany display at the University of Kansas 
under outside pressure has led another collector of 
extremist memorabilia to express concern for his 
exhibit there. M 

The collector, Laird Wilcox of Kansas City, 
donated to the university his collection of 
thousands of pamphlets, manuscripts, recordings 
and research material on the John Birch Society, 
the Ku Klux Klan, the Black Panthers, the 
Students for a Democratic Society, the American 
Nazis, the Communist Party and the Minutemen. 

"The university administration is obviously 
unable or unwilling to resist pressures from 
minority special interest groups," Wilcox said in a 
letter to KU officials he made public. 



Local Forecast 

Variable cloudiness today through Saturday with 
Deriods of showers and thunderstorms. High in the mid 
70s. Low tonight in the upper 40s to low 50s. High Saturday 
around 70. 



Campus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for tall 

i»7l are available In the Panhellentc of fie*, 
Hoiti HOB. Deadline for registration is Juiv 
» 

AO MECH SENIORS com pmlfcplctwrct will 
be taken at the pnoto service, Calvin 
basement. at3:30p.m. Ma* J an<J3. 

TODAY 
»T OEOROS GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY 
will mitt In Thompson KM at 5 p.m. 

ARCHITECTURAL EN8INBERINO Will 
thow a movie on the building of In* SI Louis 
arch In the Union Liftl* Theatre at 4 x pm 



ALPHA ZETA Initiates will m**1 at the 
shelter house. Sunset Zoo, at 3pm. for make- 
up workday. Actives are asked to attend. 

CAMPUS CRUSADE POR CHRIST will 

meet in the Union Slfl I room at 7 p.m. 



SENIOR CLASS final IliftQ will be at Tuttle, 
below the lubes at I p.m. 

WP-WF dropping 
deadline today 

Today is the last day to with- 
draw from any classes with a 
grade of Withdrew Passing or 
Withdrew Failing being recorded. 

A special form from the class 
instructor must be signed by an 
advisor and taken to the basement 
of Farrell Library in order for the 
grade to be recorded. After today, 
only the letter grade or credit-no 
credit can be recorded on grade 
reports. 



INTER VARSITY CHRISTIAN 

FELLOWSHIP will meet in Union III at 7 p.m 

KAPPA SIOMA STARDUSTERS will meet 
at Blue Lou at J 30 p.m 

DIETETIC STUDENTS will have* picnic at 
T utile, meet In Justin parking lot at a p.m. 
Bring your own food end beverage. 

SATURDAY 
DOCTOR-PATIENT COMMUNICATION 
workshop will he at the Women's tenter, 411 
Poynttet Ipm. 

ALPHA CHI SIOMA initiation will be In King 

Hall, third floor, eft a.m. 

SOCIETY POR CREATIVE 

ANACHRONISM medieval festival will be at 
UMHE and Durland lield from 11 a.m. to a 
pm. Thepwblieitinvited. 

DAIRY SCIENCE CLUE dairy judging 
contest will be at the dairy center at 1 p.m. 

SUNDAY 

DAUGHTERS OF DIANA will meet at the 
TKE hoot* at 5 I 30 p. m . for picnic. 

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS BENEFIT 
BARBECUE will be on th* Weber Hall lawn 
from a p.m. to 7p.m. Adult* «; children SI. 50. 

BIG BROTHERS-BIO SISTERS celebrity 
softbali will be at City Park at I p.m. 

KSU P.C.O. will meet at 2015 Hunting al 4 
p.m. 

ALPHA CHI SIOMA PRC banquet will be at 
Gr*gov**«t*p.m. 

KSU RECREATION CLUB will meet at Cico 
Park lor a cookout at S p.m. 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OP INDUSTRIAL 
ENGINEERS will meet at Kennedy's el 5:30 
p.m. 

K-LAIRES will meel In th* Union KSU 
rooms at 7 p.m. 

KANSAS STATE SPORTS CAR CLUE will 
meet at the parking lot north of Waters Hall at 
• a.m. 

ALPHA PHI OMEGA will meet In Union III 
al p.m. tor activation of spring pledge claw. 

KAPPA SIOMA STARDUSTERS will meet 
«t the Kappa Sigma house at 8 p.m. 

ARTS A SCIENCES COUNCIL will meet In 
Union 207 at 7 p.m. 

MONDAY 
DAUGHTERS OP DIANA will meet in 109 
Ford at 9p.m. 

ALPHA PHI OMEGA will meet tn Union 213 
at 7 p.m. lor officer installation. 

MICRO CLUE will meet In Leasure 201 at 7 
p.m. lor elections. Dr. Urban will speak. 

ALPHA TAU ALPHA will meet in Union 207 
atSSOp.m 

TAU BETA PI will meet In Seaton 179 at »: 30 

p.m 

BUS) NESS COUNCIL will meet in th* Union 
Boardroom al 4 p m 

LITTLE SISTERS OF THE STAR AND 

LAMP will meet at the Pi Kappa Phi house at 
( 30pm. Attendance is mandatory . 

INTRA FRATERNITY COUNIL Will meet In 
the Union Council Chambers at 7 p.m. 



TGIF 

WITH 

US! 

• 10' POPCORN 

• '1.70 PITCHERS 

• 50* STEINS 




Congratulations to another 

lovely initiation class of 

AT0 Little Sisters: 



Debbie Allan 
Suzi Ball 
Lisa Bean 
Carol Bowen 
Leslie Brockman 
Beth Curry 
Susan Eisiminger 
Susan Harrington 
Heidi Holiday 
Janice Hull 
Becca Kaufmann 
Pam Kogler 



Dixie Kuklinski 
Carolyn Lipscomb 
Robin Livers 
Ann McNutt 
Jane Mollett 
Julie Moss 

Valerie Palmer 
Robin Peppers 
Barbara Presta 
Brenda Raile 
Cindy Smith 
Shannan Zeigler 



The Manhattan Jaycees invite you to attend the 

Miss Manhattan K-State Scholarship Pageant 

Saturday, April 29th, 7:30 p.m. 
Manhattan City Auditorium 



Admission: Adults fa Children under 12 (2 

Tickets at Sears. J.C. Penney'*, Chamber. Main 
Banks or From contestants. 



Featuring: MISS KANSAS 
Miss Manhattan K-S tale and 
K-STATE CONCERT 
STAGE BAND 

Sponsored by : 
Manhattan Jaycees, 
Met all Pattern Co.. 
MECCA and Manhattan Mer- 
chants* Businesses and Pageant Friends 




EE^S^*. Beta Sigma; Patricia Beier LucWe, 
High; Sherrie Bennett, Troy, Ks.; Kandyce Berry, Chi Omega- 
Ford Hall; Shirley Bruey, Smurthwaite; Muffet Clem Delta Delta 
Delta-Fori Hall; Janan Cupit, Putnam Hall; Mary Gill. and L Gam- 
ma Phi Beta; Kathleen Heimerman, Smurthwaite; Susan Migall 
Delta Delta Delta-Boyd Hall; DeAnn Tucker, Goodnow Hail; and 
Robin Walker, Alpha Kappa Alpha. 
Major Sponsors: McCall Pattern Co. and MECCA 

$100 Sponsors: Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. of Manhattan, Union National Bank & 
Trust Co., First National Bank, Kansas State Bank, Citizens State 
Bank & Trust Co., S&A Electric, Farm Bureau Insurance Services 
Contributing Sponsors: Sears. Roebuck & Co.. Music Village, Stevenson's, J.C. Penny. Limbockers- 
Bocker's 2 Manhattan Floral Co.. Fashion Two-Twenty. Frontier Kasl. Reed & FHiol. 
Southwestern Bell. Campus Cleaners. Blakers Studio Royal. Bailey Moving and 
Storage. Ramada Inn. Watson Transfer, The Collegian. KMAX-KMKF Radio, Manhat- 
tan Mercury. Chamber of Commerce 

Advertising Sp***ers: Kansas Umber C», Roches Barber • Brauly Salons, Soapene a AUgnmenl. Kellers ft Keller * Too. R>an 
Realty Burnett David Painl Stare, SkaRp Ford, Manhattan Federal Savin** i Lean. Po*ell Brother*. Inc., The 
Sirloin Acker F.teclrir. Inc . Kites. Home Savin*.* and Loaa. Larry Scovlllea nioo Central l.lle. Tbr Master Teacher. 
< aplul Federal Savings * 1-oen Aisn.. Cealarv Zl Town * ( ouniry Real Estate. Brake Real Estate, the Added Touch. 
Pier I imports Cowan-Ed* arts- Yersensen Funeral Home. Mikes standard Sen-ire. American Homes Realty. The 
Tlothes C'loiet. Kollint; HI lb Real Estate, Mills IMfke Equip.. Inc. Cinderella Cleaners. Vista Drive In. Da re II * 
C-inlom Vans, Manhattan Mutnal Life Ian. Co.. Hair by Rich & Friend*. Wondard Mobile Homes 



Opinions 



Articles tectt 



int on this »•«* *• «•' necessarily represent the entire Cellar* 
ii«H or me Soi'd of Student Publications 



I 

Better 

use of 
monies 

needed 

I 



Glancing out the window of a classroom last week, I 
spotted some persons planting a tree. Presumably, 
they were dispatched from Facilities. 

They planted one tree; it took them almost 45 
minutes In itself, the incident isn't worthy of mention. 
The interesting aspect is that there were five persons 
there, planting one tree. 

Four were men, one was a woman. The woman dug 
the hole, one of the men assisted her. He then went to 
the truck, picked up the tree and placed it in the hole. 
The other three men stood and watched. This could 
have been an isolated incident. It may not always 
require five persons to plant one tree. Or, does it? 

The overutilization of manpower is a problem facing 
government, industry and, now, institutions such as 
ours. How many individuals are we paying to stand 
around and watch two persons plant a tree? How 
many other times do incidents such as this occur? 

TOO OFTEN, persons are hired and never fired. 



This leads to an overabundance of individuals on a 
payroll and a misexpenditure of monies. With the 
many individuals on a payroll, no one has to work very 
hard. Everyone's job is easier. People become lazier. 

At K-State, the proper allocation of monies is 
necessary because of necessary budget constraints. 
Perhaps if we can weed out those who aren't being 
productive we will have more money for academic 
purposes. 

The library could use money to purchase more 
books and keep more magazines on hand. Most every 
department on campus could undoubtedly use the 
money which is being spent to keep non-workers on the 
payroll. 

Let's investigate incidents such as this and see if we 
can get rid of unnecessary payroll burdens. 




\ 










OWE 

\ 





'ft »r 

JTLE ? 



&r*au;lMCtMMW 








Letters to the editor 



Don't restrain free speech 



Editor. 



RE: Alan Montgomery's 
editorial of AprU 19. "Nazi 
rights?" 

The First Amendment states 
that Congress shall make NO law 
abridging the right of free speech. 
This freedom was extended to 
protect against state action by the 
Fourteenth Amendment. What this 
means is that speech cannot be 
abridged unless there is a clear 
and present danger that the speech 
will create an imminent possibility 
of violence at the moment. A 
hostile audience does not have a 
veto power over a peaceful 
demonstration, whether the group 
that is demonstrating is 
threatening to them personally or 
not. 

YELLING "fire" in a crowded 
theater is not a correct analogy to 
the situation in Skokte (where the 
Nazi's wish to march K In the case 
of the person yelling "fire," there 
is not enough time for contrary 
opinions to be heard before panic 
let* in. But, in Skokie, not only is 
th-re ample time to hear opposing 
opinions and stage counter 
demonstrations, but no one has to 
go and hear the Nazi speeches, 

As Voltaire once wrote, "I may 
disapprove of what you say, but I 
will defend to the death your right 
to say it." The American Civil 
Liberties Union (ACLU) is now in 
that position, but we know we are 
on the correct side of the issue. We 
are not defending the Nazis per se 
(most of our members find them 
just as repulsive as does anyone 
else) ; we are defending their right 
to speak. This leads to the question 
that Montgomery brought up as to 



whether we should defend people 
who would abolish free speech if 
they were to gain power. 

THE ACLU always has and 
always will accept free speech 
cases before anything else. We 
feel that free speech is one of the 
basic rights that is necessary for 
any kind of peaceful political 
change. If we deny free speech to 
the Nazis, or to anyone else for that 
matter, we are no better than they, 
A constitutional democracy does 
not forsake guaranteed citizens 
rights and adopt an authoritarian 
stance to deal with authoritarians; 
otherwise, it is not correctly called 
a democracy. 

Montgomery stated that there is 
a direct conflict between the 
freedom of speech and the "right to 
be left alone" inherent in this case. 



But there is no such "right to be 
left alone" when the public streets 
are being used for a peaceful 
demonstration. The Supreme 
Court has always recognized that 
the streets are the correct forum 
for public protest. 

Prior restraint of free speech is 
looked on with great contempt by 
the Supreme Court. Not only does 
prior restraint prevent entirely the 
expression of the would-be 
speaker, but it also deprives the 
public of its right to know what the 
speaker would have said. 

If the Nazis lose their right to 
march peacefully in Skokie, 111., or 
any other place in the U.S. , not only 
do their rights suffer, but so do 
everyone else's. 

Ron Nelson 
President, K-State ACLU 



Cays aren't a minority, 
they need psychiatric aid 



Editor, 

RE: Greg Nett's April 27 letter to 
the editor, "Gays are here to 

stay." 

I see nothing wrong with K-State 
being called "Silo Tech" or the 
"Redneck capital of Kansas" and 
it sure as hell sounds a lot better 
than being called the "Fag capita) 
of Kansas." 

To refer to those of us who detest 
homosexuals as being bigots is 
total nonsense. Homosexuals are 
not minorities in the true racial 
sense, but are mentally sick people 



who drasliely need psychiatric 
help. Homosexuality is like an 
infectious disease in society that 
will spread if not treated. 

I personally would not want my 
children growing up thinking that 
being a fag is something natural or 
all right. I believe gays should be 
treated in the same way mentally 
disturbed people are treated and, 
for the most severe cases, they 
should be committed to an in- 
stitution. 

Galen Critchfield 
Sophomore in wildlife biology 



KAY COLES 
Managing Editor 



Julie Doll 



Defying the average 

The story you are about to read may be hard to swallow, but it is true. I 
didn't even bother to change the names. Take mine for example— Julie 
Doll 

I'm 21 and a junior in journalism. I live in Garden City. 

My father Emanuel is 54. He is a farmer and rancher. Catherine, that's 
my mother, is 49. She's 5'3" and about 160 pounds. 

The U.S. Census Bureau reported last year that the average family has 
2.1 children. 

I have nine sisters and seven brothers, which adds up to 17 children for 
Catherine and Emanuel Doll. 

This is what it's like being one of 17 children. We have a sense of 

humor. 

I admit it is an oddity; it must be, because I'm the target of endless 
questions (all of which I've heard a few hundred times). And enough is 
enough, so for one last time, I will answer your inquiries which are fast 
becoming cliches. 

QUESTION. Are any of the 17 adopted? 

Answer. Who in their right mind would adopt when they have 17 kids? 

Q. How about twins? 

A. No thanks. 

Q. Are they all from the same two parents? 

A. That's all it takes. 

Q. Are you Catholic or Mormon? 

A. Let's just say we have our own parish. 

Q. What does your father do for a living? 

A. Inbetween, he farms 4,000 acres. 

Q. What does your mother do? 

A. With 17 kids, what do you think she does? 

QUESTION. With that many children, you must have a gigantic 
house? 

A. Not really. We have six bedrooms so we only sleep in shifts oc- 
casionally. 

Q. Did you ever have your own bedroom? 

A. Yes, I have a sister who once attacked in her sleep, and I guess Mom 
and Dad saw the same tendencies in me. 

Q. Where do your parents vacation? 

A. Alone. 

Q. Haven't your parents ever heard of TV and cold showers? 

A. Evidently, they prefer sex. 

Q. Haven't they tried birth control? 

A. Of course, why do you think there's only 17? 

QUESTION. Is your mom planning on any more? 
A. She didn't plan on the first 17. 
Q. Have you heard of Zero Population Growth (ZPG)? 
A. What? 

Q. Are any of your brothers and sisters married? 
A. My dad says, "not enough." 
Q. Do you like coming from a large family? 

A. There are disadvantages, like drawing straws for a chair at dinner. 
The unlucky ones take potluck in theTV room, basement or garage. 

IN ADDITION, to these questions, I hear such comments as: 

"You must have some old man." 

"Your poor mom." 

"Seventeen kids, that's enough for a round- robin basketball tour- 
nament." 

"I' 11 bet you take up a whole page in the Census Bureau report." 

"You must be a whole McDonald's franchise by yourselves. " 

"Do you travel by Greyhound or by train loads?" 

That's it for the printable questions and comments. If you happen to 
think of any more, keep them to yourself. Remember, we outnumber 
you. 



Kansas Sta te Coll egian 

Friday, April 28, 1978 

Ttte COLLEGIAN it published by Student Publication*. !nc , Kansas State University, 
daily except Saturday*, Sundays, holiday* and vacation periods 

OFFiCfs are tn the north wing ol KediieMali.ptwneSJioSSS 

S ECON D CLASS postage paid at Manhattan. Kansas** jM Publication No IMOM. 

* SUBSCRIPTION BATES 

US, one calendar year. $7 SO, one semester 

THE COLLEGIAN functions in a legally autonomous relationship with live University 
and is written and edited by students serving, the University community 

Chnv Williams, Editor 
Mark Tindle. Advertising Manager 



KAHSAS STATE COUEQUN, gMpMMg 



Letters to the editor 

Dachau not a *work center' 



Editor, 

I wish to comment on the 
statements made by Gerald 
Domitovic who was quoted in the 
April 20 Collegian article, "War 
memories still an open wound. ' * 

Domitrovic, I must respond to 
your comments concerning the 
Holocaust as quoted in that article. 
In your statements you imply that 
tales of gas chambers and con- 
centration camps are "tremen- 
dously big lies" and that, in reality 
they (the camps) were just work 
centers. 

As an undergraduate history 
major, I had the opportunity to 
travel in Europe. During those 
travels, I visited the concentration 
camp at Dachau, West Germany. 
The following questions come to 
mind considering the unusual 
nature of the Dachau "work 
center:" 

1) WHY are the German people 
of Dachau so embarrassed to give 
outsiders directions to the camp? 

2) Why is the "work center" 
surrounded by an eight foot wall, 
barbed wire, a four-foot trench that 
was once mined? Why are there 
guard towers? 



3) Why does the museum at 
Dachau document the deaths (by 
shooting, gas, malnutrition, 
disease, etc.) of over 40,000 
"workers?" These were not just 
Jews; they were French, Ger- 
mans, Poles, Austrians, Czechs, 
Russians. Danes, Hungarians, etc. 
Not just Jews but doctors lawyers, 
theologians, politicians and women 
and children. 

4) Why does the museum show 
documentation of false documents 
given the Red Cross during the war 
stating that the Nazis were feeding 
the people at Dachau a healthy 
ration of food every day when the 
actual Nazi documents admit to 
only supplying 250 calories per 
capita per day? Does it make sense 
to starve workers? 

5) WHY did Nazi doctors at 
Dachau (and other camps) per- 
form grotesque experiments on 
"workers?" 

6) Why are there gas chambers 
disguised as showers at a work 
center? And why are there 
crematoriums, mass graves, 
torture rooms at that "work 
center?" 

7> Why did the Dachau "work 
Center" designed for 7,500 



Big Brothers-Big Sisters 
stereotype the single parent 



"workers" end up holding over 
20,000 persons by 1945? 

8) Why did the SS battalion 
stationed outside Dachau use 
"Dachau workers" for target 
practice, and to perfect methods of 
torture? 

9) Why did the Nazis keep actual 
films of their executions of Jews 
and other prisoners at Dachau and 
other camps'' 

I could go on. But why? Dachau 
was just a work center. A nice one 
compared to Treblinke and Ausch- 
witz. Domitrovic asked, "Why 
would the Germans purposely kill 
off their labor force?" I ask, why 
would the Germans purposely take 
millions of their own people and 
those of other countries and put 
them behind barbed wire or into 
forced labor. 

Perhaps the reason the 
Holocaust has been accepted as 
historical fact for many years is 
because it is just that— a fact. 
Perhaps Domitrovic should read 
'"Mein Kampf." It will tell him 
that the systematic removal of 
non-Arian populations from 
Europe by the Nazis is more than 
propaganda. From the sounds of 
his "right-wing conservative" 
statements, I would wager he has a 
copy handy. 

David Garrett 
Graduate student In biology 



Editor, 

I have just finished reading the 
advertisement for the Big 
Brothers-Big Sisters (BBBS) of 
Manhattan in the April 25 
Collegian. I am doing a very slow 
boil. As a single, female parent, I 
resent the innuendo that single 
female parents are not capable of 
dealing rationally with divorce or 
separation. Single parents have 
enough problems overcoming the 
archaic attitudes of society without 
advertisements which make it 
sound like their children are 
mistreated. 

I believe the BBBS progam is a 
fine organization, and serves a 
useful purpose. I would certainly 
not object to a big brother for my 
son, but only if that big brother 
were to realize that my son is MY 
son, and I would like to raise him 
according to my values. The 
reason he is able to be a big brother 
to my son would be because I felt it 
valuable to my child to interact 
with a variety of people. 



BUT, I would certainly NOT 
appreciate or tolerate some 
bleeding-heart taking over with the 
misguided idea that my child is 
deprived, mistreated, insecure and 
misled because I am not married! 
Besides, if the mother is really as 
horrible as the indicates, what 
makes them think she will let 
someone else take over. Anyone 
selfish enough to deprive a child of 
knowledge of her father would 
certainly be selfish enough to 
deprive her of a "friend." 

Jenl Kemnlti 
Manhattan resident 



Every Monday 
Afternoon is 

BARGAIN DAY 

at PUTT-PUTT 

3 Games for $1.04 

Play as many games as you 
wish for $2.00. 



PUTT-PUTT" 



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Weot on Hwr- IS 

•play Today & Chase 

The Blues Away" 

WestonH.W. 18 



ENGINEERING STUDENT COUNCIL 

Monday, May 1, 6:30 P.M. 

U205A-B 

Attendance is mandatory for 1978-9 
Council Candidates 



TRUE OUT THKE OUT 

BUY 9 LARGE or MEDIUM 
PIZZAS and get I FREE 



YOUR CHOICE OF TOPPINGS 




CALL 



537-43 50 



VILLAGE PLAZA 
SHOPPING CENTER 




4\. ^-^— ^^ *♦ 

B* Union f*£ 

Apr. 30 

Jeremiah 
Johnson" 



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WITH TH€ GR€€K KIND 



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GRtL._. 

7 8 

This is Your Week... 

GREEKS! 

Sunday, April 30 

ALL GREEK SUNDAY 

Behind Acker's home 
10:00 a.m. 

MONDAY, MAY 1 

Exchange Dinner 5:30 n.m. 

TUESDAY, May 2 

LEADERSHIP BANQUET 
ffint His Room 6:30 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 3 

Greek Week T-Shirt or Greek Letter T-Shirt Day 
THURSDAY, MAY 4 

King & Queen Elections in Union 
CLOSE ENCOUNTER night in Aggie 

FRIDAY, MAY 5 

Picnic and Keggor-TutHo Puddle 
3:30 p.m. 

SATURDAY, MAY 6 

GREEK FOLLIES 

7:30 p.m. McCain AudHorium 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frl., April 28, 1978 



New bright, little eyes view 
Sunset Zoo's improvements 



BY KAREN V INI NG 
Collegian Reporter 

Manhattan's Sunset Zoo has 
been getting a face lift and zoo 
officials and the animals seem to 
tike the change. 

"We are not expanding the zoo, 
just improving it," said zoo 
director Tom Demry. "We are 
shooting Tor quality, not quantity." 

"Unfortunately most of the 
public can't see the improvements 
we have made so far," Demry 
said. 

Last July zoo officials started 
new diets for the animals, he said. 

The changes in the diets include 
changes in the amounts given to 
the animals, more minerals and 
vitamins given to them and 
changing from bread and lettuce 
to commercial brand of food. 

"We have not gone completely to 
a commerical brand of food for all 
the animals because we can't 
afford it yet," Demry said. 

Other general improvements 
include cleaning up the animals 
cages, repairing them and 
building a sewage system 

Currently the zoo is using 
cesspools instead of sewers, 
Demry said. 

THE FIRST branch of the sewer 
system will be put in this month. It 
will connect the Zoo House and the 
Animal Shelter into the sewer. A 
branch connecting the animal 
cages into the sewer will be put in 
later. 

"I am not sure when these (the 
sewers for the cages) will be put 
in. The City Engineer is doing 
it," Demry said. 

Plans for the care of the animals 



and the maintenance of their 
cages have been drawn up. 

The old rabbit house will be 
gutted and 11 metal units will be 
built for hospitalizing and 
quarantining the animals. 

"Before, when the animals were 
sick, they were left in their cages 
out in the public's view. They had 
no privacy," Demry said. 

Preventive medicine is being 
practiced instead of treating the 
animals after they get sick. 

Dr. Robert Taussig, a 
veterinarian from K-State's 
Dykstra Veterinary Hospital goes 
to the zoo once a week to check the 
animals. 

He can catch things the em- 
ployees miss in the way the 
animals are looking, Demry said. 

THE CHANGES seem to be 
agreeing with the animals. There 
has been a big boom in animal 
reproduction, Demry said. 

This is the first time in 10 years 
that the zoo's golden eagles have 
laid eggs, Demry said. 

Also three lions were born at 
Sunset Zoo on April 17, the first in 
25 years. 

Among the dozen or so pregnant 
animals at the zoo is a jaguar 
which is expected to give birth 
soon. 

The Sunset Zoo has been asked 
by other zoos to participate in an 
animal loan progam. 

"Other zoos are recognizing 
there are professional people here. 
The real judge is when your peers 
recognize the zoo is capable of 
having the loan animals," Demry 
said. 

In the animal loan program, a 



zoo director will ask another zoo 
director if his zoo can use any 
animals temporarily. It is a 
"friendship deal," Demry said. 

A MASTER plan to renovate the 
zoo is being drawn up by 
Manhattan park superintendent 
Jim Manning and two K-State 
architectural engineering 
students, Ron Patterson and 
Darlye Hager, Demry said. 

Patterson said he and Hager, 
are working for the zoo "to help 
them out" and not for college 
credit. 

The master plan consisits of 
improving the exhibits that now 
exist. 

"The Parks Board and the 
Friends of the Zoo have approved 
phase 1 of the plan," he said. "On 
May 9, we will take phase 1 before 
the City Commission. We need 
them to approve the concept of the 
plan, not the cost." 

Phase 1 will include im- 
provements in the Tallgrass 
Prairie, Canine Canyon, exotic 
birds and the outdoor monkey 
exhibits. 

These improvements will in- 
clude better cages for the birds 
and monkeys and the general 
upgrading of the Tallgrass Prairie 
exhibit and the Canine Canyon. 

Phase 1 of the master plan will 
cost about $70,000, Demry said. 



Charity softball game planned 

The air will be filled with colored Ping-Pong balls dropped from an 
airplane. 

Gary Spani, Kansas State's Mr. AU-American, turns coach. 

Willie Wildcat has been promoted to general manager. 

All of this sounds zany, and it is. But it's all for a good cause, the an- 
nual Big Brothers and Sisters (BBS) charity softball game. 

The time is Sunday, at 1 :30 p.m. and the place, Jerry Wilson Field at 
City Park. 

The BBS opponents will be the members of Delta Delta Delta sorority 
and area disc jockeys from KSDB, KMCC, KJCK andKMAN-KMKF. 

KnState basketballer Rolando Blackman will coach the Delts and 
Jocks. 

Mayor Bob Under of Manhattan will throw out the first pitch. 

JA-BO the clown, from the Shrine Temple in Topeka will be joined by 
Rev. David Fly's clown school, in an attempt to divert attention from the 
K -State cheerleaders. 

The Ping-Pong balls will be color-coded, and can be exchanged for 
prizes donated by area merchants. 

The game will be the climax of Big Brothers and Sister Week, during 
which local restaurants and merchants have donated shares of their 
profits and aided in recruiting. 



THE LUNCHEON SPECIAL 

FROM 11 to 4 

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Attention Engineering Students 

Elections for Council Officer! 
and Sophomore Representative 

Wednesday, May 3, 9 a.m.4 p.m. 

Vote in Cardwell and Sea ton front lobbies. 
Bring your Fee Card. 



COMM. SPEC. LTD 

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SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 

"College students ... had better hurry. Jobs are to be had 
this year, but they're going fast." 



U.S. News & World Report 

4-24-78 



__ ^—_ -^— 



I 



A nation wide firm is interviewing at It- 
State today, April 28th. 

Job Characteristics: 

• Pays $3000— $4000/ summer 

• Excellent Resume experience 

• Chance to leave Kansas 

• Future employment possibilities 

Job Qualifications: 

• Must be hardworking 

• Be willing to re-locate 

• Have at least a 2.1 GPA 



If these characteristics appeal to YOU, come by 
ROOM 205C in the Union today; and compare this job 
with the one you are thinking about doing this sum- 
mer. Don't dress up, but please be prompt. Come by 
at 1:00, 3:30, 6:00 or 8 :30 p.m. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, FrL, April 26, 1878 



Residents 'come on down ' 
for Moore Hall 'Price is Nice' 



BY DIANE JOHNSON 
Collegian Reporter 

"Good evening, ladles and gentlemen, and 
welcome to the 'Price is Nice!'" the emcee's voice 
echoed through the crowded basement of Moore Hall 
Wednesday night. 

The first four contestants were asked to "come on 
down" and try their chances at winning some of the 
1800 worth of prizes. 

Then one of the lovely models brought out the first 
item, a bar of Irish Spring soap, for the contestants 
to guess the actual retail price. 

The first contestant's bid of 23 cents brought booes 
from the crowd. The second contestant's bid was 59 
cents, the third 47 cents and the fourth bid was 37 
cents with the crowd still disapproving. 

"The actual retail price is 48 cents," yelled the 
announcer as the winner came jumping up to toe 
stage hugging and kissing the emcee. 

Then the winning contestant got the chance to win 
a prime-rib dinner at Kennedy's Claim. She lost the 
dinner, but kept the bar of soap. 

ONE OF the several winners in the "Price is Nice" 
was Rodney Stewart, freshman in agriculture 
education, who won a pair of stereo headphones 
worth $25. 

"At first I wasn't even going to come down and 
now I'm glad I did," Stewart said. 

Kent Bryon, freshman in chemical engineering, 
won a dinner for two at Valentino's restaurant and 
free dry cleaning for his suit 

"For not expecting to win anything, this is pretty 
good. This is a lot of fun and I didn't have anything 
better to do," Bryon said. "Besides, I do need my 
suit dry cleaned." 

Cheri Silkman, senior in business, was the winner 



of the grand prize which included a smith-Corona 
typewriter and other prizes. The grand prize was 
worth $300 and Silkman won it by guessing the 
nearest retail value. 

"I don't believe this. I didn't want to get up here 
and my friends talked me into it. I didn't expect 
anything like this," Silkman said. 

BOB SIMEONE, director of Moore, said he got the 
idea for the "Price is Nice" from the television's 
"The Price is Right" game-show. 

"I was just watching 'The Price is Right' and 
thought it was corny. Then I got to thinking that 
maybe it would be fun to do in the dorm," Simeone 
said. 

Simeone, with the help of the Moore Hall Gover- 
ning Board, went to Manhattan merchants who were 
willing to donate several prizes. The HGB furnished 
the grand prize. 

Layton Smith, senior in mechanical engineering, 
was the emcee for the program. 

"I thought it went pretty good There were a lot of 
pleased people- a lot of shocked people," Smith said 
"I was really pleased with how the Manhattan 
merchants supported us in this. It shows how much 
they appreciate us." 

Chuck Winter, senior in business, was the an- 
nouncer. 

"It was a well-spent evening I think everyone had 
a lot of fun," Winter said 

Winter said in order to plan the games used for 
their "Price is Nice" show, the planners spent a lot 
of time watching "The Price is Right" on television. 

"I was real pleased that a lot of people showed up 
and had a good time," Simeone said "There's 
always talk about students being apathetic and 
negative about getting involved. I'm real pleased 
this worked out" 



No more swaying in the wind; 
Anderson Hall bell tower braced 



K-State Physical Plant car- 
penters have corrected a five 
degree sway in toe Anderson Hall 
bell tower. 

Merrill Richardson and Harold 
Hood, Physical Plant carpenters, 
have spent the last two weeks 
bracing the 99 year-old tower. 

The system of cables and wood 
braces designed by the carpenters 
has probably saved the University 
several thousand dollars, ac- 
cording to Paul Young, vice- 
president for Facilities. 

Young credited the carpenters 
with saving what "to most people 
is the symbol of this University. " 



The primary concern was how 
long the tower would stay up if it 
wasn't braced, Richardson said. 

"When we first came up here it 
(the tower) would lean five 
degrees with the wind. I was 
petrified the first time I came up 
here," Richardson said. 

You could stand in the center of 
the tower and watch the sides 
sway, he said. 

THE CARPENTERS had to 

design a bracing system which 
would take out most, but not all of 
the sway. 
"If you take out all of the sway it 



Johnson County may lead liquor vote 

OLATHE (AP) ^Johnson County residents might get a chance to vote 
Aug. 1 on a referendum to allow liquor by the drink in the county's 
restaurants. 

"It wouldn't displease me if Johnson County took the lead on this, but 
we'll wait to see if there is a challenge," said John Franke, one of two 
county commissioners who said Thursday he would draft a resolution 
placing the issue on the Aug. 1 primary ballot. 

Franke and Commissioner Robert Bacon said they have detected a 
grounds well of support among constituents for liquor by the drink, and 
Bacon predicted it would pass by a two-to-one margin in the county. 

The state legislature passed a bill Wednesday which clarified earlier 
legislation. It requires local option voting by counties and requires that 
liquor can be served only with food in restaurants. 



is more likely to break off," 
Richardson said. 

The bracing system uses a 
series of steel cables looped 
around railroad ties at the top and 
two steel beams at the bottom. 

"The steel beams are set a foot 
into the masonary at each end," 
Richardson said. 

He said all of toe wind stress is 
now transmitted to the masonary 
part of the building. 

In the process of bracing the 
building, the carpenters had to 
work around an old brass bell. 

"It was almost like re- 
discovering it. They should move 
it somewhere so that people could 
see it," Richardson said. 

The bell dates back to Bluemont 
College and was donated by 
Joseph Ingalls Esq. of Swamp- 
scott, Mass., in 1861. 




KIDNEY FOUNOATION OF 

KANSAS A WESTERN MISSOURI 



SLAGLE'S GREENHOUSE 

Flowering annua Is — vegeta bles— perennia Is 




DAIRY JUDGING CONTEST 

sponsored by 

KSU DAIRY SCIENCE CLUB 
Sat., April 29 1:00 P.M. 

KSU DAIRY CENTER 

A picnic for all contestants will 
be held at Tuttie after the contest 



Bosn's Mate 




FRIDAY 
SPECIAL 

Fish Sandwich 
French Fries 
20 cent Drink 
Small Sundae 



brazier 



•R«g. U.S. P»t. Off., Am. D.-Q. Corp. 
©Copyrlfhl |974, Am . D.Q. Carp. 



All 

For 

Only 



*i 



42 



1015 N. 3rd 



The Kansas State University Chapter 

of Phi Beta Kappa announces the 

initiation of the 1977-78 doss 

of new members: 



David Edmund Cink 
Charles Roy Coffey 
Donna Jo Francis 
Dianne L. Hart 
Grace Yachueng Hwang 
Paula Rae Jacques 
Rex Marion Joyce 
Donald James McSweyn 
Michelle Miller 



APRIL 27, 1978 

Theodore James Nichols 
Patrick Cain Sargent 
Kim Stegman 
Jill Loraine Stewart 
Shelagh Stromberg 
Steven Craig Turner 
DanaJoTyrell 
Louis Herman Wetzel 



DECEMBERS, 1978 

Liam Jess Atchison 

Joann Elaine Hamick 

Rebecca Jo Hay 

Lois Ann Hinson 

Bill Bernard Macomber 



Brothers' 



* 






PRESENTS: 

The Forever Clevfer 


• 


POTT COUNTY 
PORK & BEAN BAND 




— Country Rock — 

TGIF with our Handsome Employees 

-TODAY- 

1:00-7:00 J 
M.50 Pitchers -30* Steins 


1 IJ 


-TONIGHT- 

Bond ploys 8:30-Clo$e 
*2.00 Cover 




( Pork & Beans. . . one of the stmplier 
ple*suret In life. ) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri., April 28, 1978 



front Emu 



History of jazz: no comic book course 



jazz has made. Ninety-seven 
percent of most music education is 
on European music. There's 
nothing wrong with that. There's a 
place for all kinds of music. But 
jazz shouldn't be ignored." 
Part of the problem in making 




jazz respectable has been its 
notorious beginning in the brothels 
of New Orleans and other cities at 
the turn of the century. It was 



By SCOTT FARINA 

Contributing Writer 

He doesn't fit the stereotype 
image of a jazzman. Dressed in 
white turtleneck, blue blazer and 
checked pants, he looks, well, 
respectable. And that is precisely 
the point. 

Matt Bet ton is at K State to make 
jazz respectable. 

"Back in 1958, a student here (at 
K State) had ISO signatures on a 
petition asking for a jazz program 
of some kind. The president at that 
time (James McCain) said, 'We 
will teach jazz when we teach 
comic books.' " 

The smile widens to a grin. Next 
fall Betton will teach a history of 
jazz course in the building that 
bears that former president's 
name. 

The name Matt Betton probably 
means tittle to the average jazz 
listener, but it has great meaning 
to some 2,600 music educators and 
2,000 music students, all members 
of the National Association of Jazz 
Educators (NAJE). Betton 
founded the Manhattan-based 
organization a decade ago in an 
attempt to make jazz respectable 
in music education circles. 

"THIS IS America's art form, 
the only one so far, but we are not 
made aware of the contribution 

AAoliere's 'Tartuffe': 
classical TV comedy 

BY SCOTT FARINA 
Contributing Writer 

Blow the dust of 300 years from Moliere's play "Tartuffe" and you find 
it is composed of the same basic ingredients that make up today's 
television situation comedies— and that's meant in a kind way. 

This classic play contains a good deal of slapstick, a bit of drunkeness, 
lots of movement, loud dialogue, puns, double entendres and a little 
bawdiness for good measure. There is even, amidst the comedy, a 
moral, though never at the expense of the entertainment. 

The character Tartuffe (Bruce Bardwell) is a hypocrite, a seemingly 
pious man whose religious posturing is done solely for secular purposes. 
His able tongue has earned him a permanent guest spot in the home of 
Orgon, (Kevin Brown) who believes the unctuous malarky flowing from 
Tartuffe' s lips. The play revolves around the exposure of Tartuffe for the 
fraud he is. 

The only adjustment an audience has to make to enjoy this sort of 
period play is to understand the language of the day, admittedly not an 
easy task. The play is in verse, which requires some getting used to, and 
then there is that idiom of language that is not the same as our everyday 
speech. But it's an easy adjustment if you don't fight it. 

IT WOULD be less difficult, however, if certain actors would speak up 
and slow down. Sitting In the balacony, one had to strain to hear most 
lines of Organ's mother (played by Paula Melnick), and her constant 
strutting back and forth, talking to the side walls, only increased the 
problems. 

A different sort of problem was presented by Cindy Helferstay as 
Donne, maid to Orgon's daughter. She has some of the funniest tines in 
the play, and her sense of timing and vitality is the best in the cast. But 
some of the lines are too rapid to be understood. It's tough enough cat- 
ching fast dialogue in a Neil Simon play, let alone one in ancient verse. 

Problems of comprehension aside, the play is a delight. There is a 
wealth of physical activity in the play, from exaggerated movement to 
barely-visible gesture. Nobody, but nobody, sits still in this comedy. The 
pacing is fast, furious and funny. 

"Tartuffe" is all the more enjoyable because of the fine touches added 
by John Uthoff and his technical crew. The set is visible as one enters the 
theater, and on stage is a six-piece music ensemble playing chamber 
music. 

Attempting to judge the performances in a farce such as this is not 
easy; just as in TV sitcoms, there is a situation that the actors must 
resolve. There is often little time far character development, what with 
all the running about and shouting. 

janet Sunderland, as Orgon's wife Elmire, has the meatiest role in 
terms of variety, and she uses the opportunity well. Her scene with 
Tartuffe, in which she tries to seduce him into seducing her to show her 
husband (who is hiding under the table) what a rat Tartuffe really is, is a 
riot; a blend of modesty, arousal and fear. 

Orgon, slightly rotund and prone to fits of yelling, is played well by 
Brown, who utilizes all the hyperbole the role requires. Orgon is, after 
all, a sweet buffoon. He is the father of all TV fathers, lovable, but dumb. 

"Tartuffe" runs through Sunday night at McCain Auditorium. In all, 
this poduction has required the work of 76 students and 14 faculty 
members. In terms of costuming asnd set design, it is an elaborate 
undertaking. Forget it's a period play. Just view it as an extremely 
funny play with a sight moral. Enjoy. 



considered sinful music, not fit for 
proper genteel ears. 

In spite of its questionable 
origins, Betton feels jazz is a 
subject people should know more 
about. What he won't do in his 
course, though, is force-feed the 



'Back In 1955, a 
student here had 150 
signatures on a 
petition asking for a 
jazz program of some 
kind. The president at 
that time (James 
McCain) said, 'We 
will teach iazz when 
we teach comic 
books." 



story of this music. Already Betton 
is talking about the use of films, 
slides, recordings and live per- 
formances to make this history 
come ah ve, not just in terms of the 
music, but its relationship to what 
was happening in the rest of the 
world. 

"The work of an early Dixieland 
band probably sounds primitive 
today. But if you understand what 
was happening then; there were 
few paved roads, no radio or 
television. If you understand the 
conditions of the times, then the 
music makes sense," 

WHO IS Matt Betton to teach a 



course on jazz history anyway? 
The biographical facts are these: 
bom and raised in Kansas City, 
Mo. ; a graduate of K -State; had his 
own dance band from 1935 to 1963, 
which was voted top college band 
in a 1941 "Billboard" magazine 
poll; a resident of Manhattan since 
his college days with wife Betty 
and was the first inductee into the 
NAJE Hall of Fame in January of 
thsyear. 

The bare facts sound so cold, and 
Betton is anything but a cold 
person. This is a man who has 
played with jazz legends; who not 
only makes his living through jazz, 
but is committed to seeing it 
recognized as the art form it is. 

Betton believes the '30s was the 
greatest era for jazz. 

"Back then, if you were a jazz 
star, it was like being a basketball 
star today." 

Kansas City was the town for 
jazz in the '30s, and there it was 
that reedman Betton played with 
the giants, jamming until break- 
fast-time in clubs up and down 
Broadway with the likes of Lester 
Young, Jay McShann and Charlie 
Parker. Betton doesn't gush about 
this period of his life, but a jazz fan 
is bound to be impressed. 

Before his duties as executive 
director of the NAJE took so much 
of his time, Betton was known not 
just for his playing abilities, but as 
a composer and arranger. The 
writing is sparse now; playing is 
mostly limited to gigs with the 
Palace Jazz Band. One thing that is 
not limited, however, is his work as 
an educator and adjudicator at 
jazz clinics across the country . 

THE CLINICS are important, in 
Betton's view. It's a way for young 
jazz hopefuls to meet working 
professionals and get some inside 
information. It's also a good way to 



strengthen the ranks of jazz 
musicians, to show that a career in 
jazz is a possibility. With an 
estimated 500,000 kids playing jazz 
in hands from elementary schools 
to colleges, it is imporbable that 
working bands and combos will 
have to scrounge for players in the 
future. 

And what does this jazz veteran 
think of today's music? 

"I like rock, really. A lot of it is 
quite good. I just hope today's rock 
fans don't forget that there have 
been other eras of music too. 

"A lot of times if you ask kids if 
they like jazz, they go 'Ugh! I hate 
it! ' But if you talk with them for a 
while, you'll find out they've never 
heard the music. If you don't know 
about something, the first thing 
you do is put it down." 

Betton believes that jazz can, 
and needs to, be taught. He helped 
found the Stan Kenton summer 
jazz camps in 1964; one week 
courses of studies at six univer- 
sities around the country. His 
NAJE is devoted not only to 
working with jazz educators, but 
with making jazz part of every 
music curriculum. Betton also 
founded the Jazz Education Press, 
which published original charts for 
jazz bands. (The NAJE and the 
Jazz Education Press share of- 
fices, but are not tied to each other. 
The NAJE is a non-profit 
organization.) 

Next semester, students enrolled 
in history of jazz will find them- 
selves with an energetic, 
knowledgeable instructor who 
seems to thrive on people as much 
as on the music with which he has 
spent his life. His enthusiasm 
should prove highly contagious. 

And who knows? Maybe a course 
on the history of comics isn't far 
behind. 




Photo by Dave KauP 



COOL IT, BUDDY... Dor Ine {Cindy Helferstay) attempts to calm down the 
"mastah" Orgon ( Kevin Brown), who is enraged by the character assaslnation of 
Tartuffe, in the opening of "Tartuffe" last night at McCain Auditorium. 

Up and Coming 



The Department of Speech and the K-State 
Players present one of the comedies of the French 
theater, Moliere's "Tartuffe." 

The comedy will play in McCain Auditorium 
tonight and Saturday night, starting at 8. 

Feature Films present the United Artists release 
of "The Pink Panther Strikes Again" in the Union 
Foum Hall today and Saturday at 7 and 9 :30 p.m. 

This comedy-mystery combines the acting talent 
of Peter Sellers and the famous saxophone- 



dominated musical score of Henri Mancini to 
provide non-stop laughs for this European-based 
film. 

Kaleidoscope Films present "The Story of Adele 
H.," to be shown at 3:30 p.m. in the Union Little 
Theatre and at 7:30 p.m. in Forum Hall on Tuesday. 

Thursday marks the KSU Symphony in concert 
with soloist Jean Hieronymi and Mischa Semanitzky 
conducting. The performance will begin at 8 p.m. in 
McCain Auditorium. 



* 



1 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frl.. AprH 2*1978 





l» AMh-vOl*— Brhtnd I »m(iui (Urlwr Sho» 



Come to Hoov's and see the 

Strippers from 4-6 and 8-12 

both Friday and Saturday nights 



Photo by Tofn Bell 



HOLE- IN-ONE.. .K-State President Duane Acker joins William Miller, president 
of the American Institute of Baking, in checking out the donuts at the AlB's 
opening in Manhattan. 

Acker praises AIB-K-State 
cooperation in ceremonies 



BY BRUCE DONLEY 
Collegian Reporter 

Dedication ceremonies of the 
international headquarters of the 
American Insititute of Baking 
(AIB) Tuesday helped establish 
Manhattan in the industry of 
baking-related science, education 
and research, 

Gov. Robert Bennett, attended 
the ceremonies sipping wine and 
admiring the eight-foot, 10-pound 
load of bread at the opening, 
bread-breaking ceremonies. 

K-State President Duane Acker, 
in a luncheon address, spoke to 
members of the baking trade and 
baking industry as well as the 
people who had played a major 
role in relocating the AIB from 
Chicago to Manhattan. Acker 
emphasized the importance of 
cooperation between K-State and 
AIB. 

THE AIB is a non-profit, 
educational and research 
organization supported by more 
than 800 member companies, 
according to Larry Wood, director 
of the communications division of 
AIB. 

"We serve both the baking and 
the food processing industries by 
providing educational services 
through our school of baking to 
people in the baking trades," 
Wood said. "We also have a 



sanitation education department 
which provides services to the 
baking industry in educating them 
about good sanitation practices." 

The relocation from Chicago to 
Manhattan was prompted in part 
by the inflated operating expenses 
and, according to Wood, the old 
building which was in Chicago was 
inadequate in size and location and 
in need of renovation. 

The proximity of AIB to K-State 
and the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture's Grain Marketing 
Research Center is a "definite 
advantage," Wood said. 

"This places Manhattan, 
Kansas, K-State, the USDA and 
the AIB as the focal point for the 
whole grain industry," Wood said. 

WOOD SEES a kind of 
reciprocal trade-off in advantages 
between K-State, AIB and the 
Manhattan community . 

"In addition to our payroll, the 
grounds we've purchased and the 
$2.5 million spent on construction 
of our building, our staff has 
purchased homes here and 
bolstered the Manhattan economy 
in that way," he said. 

Wood credited K-State with 
playing an impressive role in 
assisting AIB in its relocation here 
and helping "pave the way in the 
academic community." 

"Our students have reciprocal 



agreements between use of the 
libraries. We have an extensive 
bakery science library here and 
our students have access to the 
facilities there (K-State)," Wood 
said. 

The relationship between the 
University and the AIB is one of 
cooperation. 

"Instead of us coming in here 
and duplicating the same needs 
and services that K-State has 
already implemented, we utilize 
those and they utilize our services 
instead of duplicating them in 
their laboratories," Wood said. 

Wood indicated that several 
students from K-State will 
probably be working in the AIB 
research laboratories, possibly as 
research technologists on a part- 
time basis. 



HAPPY BIRTHDAY 

KLEILA 
LELA 

GEHEVA 

of 

WEST HALL 




The Original Hawkinson Family Estate Purchased from 
Kansas State University in 1866! 

27 acres of rolling meadows, blue grass, brome hay, tilled soil 
and a super 1 acre run off pond. 



Open for personal inspection the week-end of 
April 29th and 30th 

Located at mle marker 203 highway 77 North 



Country Living At Its Best!!!! 

This property has a lovely 4 bdr home with a new propane furnace, new well pump, and a quiet parlor 
with a warm fireplace. The house is surrounded by several good garden spots and sheltered by the 
cooling shade of an orchard full of fruit trees. This estate is ideal for family living. 
For information call: 

Town & Country Reol Estate 



913-539-2356 



Manhattan, Kansas 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
BANQUET-DANCE 

Saturday, May 6th 

6:30 at Elk's Club 
Tickets $ 6.50 

AvdfaWe in Cahrin Hal 



Now's Your Chance..! 

to become involved in KSUARH. 
Positions are open for: 

Communications Coordinator 

Newsletter editor 

Canoe Race Chairperson 

Fall Follies Chairperson 

University Activities Board Representative 

Contract Cancellation Representative 

Rec Services Representative 

Judicial Council Representative 

Applications are available from your hall direc- 
tor and are due before 5:00 p.m. on May 2. They may 
be turned in to Michele Cochran (522 West) or Laurie 
Ogborn (547 Goodnow). Any questions? Call Michele 
at 532-3880. 



Be the first to have 
one of our new Raleigh 
Bicycles that just 

drrlVeCl. A new shipment of Raleigh 
bicycles just came in and if you are fast 
on your feet you can have a choice of style 
and color. They won't stay around the 
shop very long since it seems everyone 
wants a Raleigh these days. 

The affordable 10 speed 
'New RAMPAR , RALEkZH 

R-1027 



• IQ-speed Derailleur Geares 

• 27" wheels 

• Sun Tour Derailleurs 

• Center Pull Brake with Dual-Position Brake Levers 

Suggested retail $129.95 QflfV 1 1 C&8 

2E m until May 6 

Assembled and adjusted at no extra charge 

BILL'S BIKE SHOP 

In The Alley phone: 537-1510 



10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEOIAN, Fri„ April 28. 1978 



1 Cats take condensed squad to Drake 



K-SUte will send a condensed 
women's squad to the 1978 edition 
of the Drake Relays at Des 
Moines, Iowa, Friday and 
Saturday. 

"I think we're just starting to 
come around individually and as a 
team," Wildcat head coach Barry 
Anderson said. "We're going to 
start seeing some quality times 
and performances in several 
events." 

Anderson expects his club's top 
performance this weekend to be in 
the 880-yard medley relay, an 
event in which the Wildcats will be 
defending their first place snowing 
of a year ago. 

Still somewhat undecided on the 
makeup of that relay foursome, 
Anderson probably will go with 
Sharon McKee, Lorraine 
Davidson, Jan Smith, and either 
Wanda Trent or Freda Hancock. 

TRENT, DAVIDSON. Smith, 
and Hancock also will team up for 
the 'Cats mile relay with their 
sights set on bettering last year's 
third place effort. 



"Our sprint medley will have a 
good chance to win," Anderson 
said. "I'm also anxious to see 
Renee (Urish) and Cindy (Wor- 
cester) run the 1,500 against 
Francie Larrieu and Jan Merrill." 




Larrieu and Merrill have been the 
top female middle distance run- 
ners for the last five years. 

Urish, who garnered third in an 
impressive field a year ago, 
claimed the 1,500 meter title in the 
KU Relays at Emporia over the 
weekend with a 4 : 28.4 . 

"I think Renee and Cindy are 
lust about ready to start turning in 
some quality races," Anderson 
said. "The competition will be 
tough and they may not win, but 
we should see some good per- 
formances." 

Linda Long, who finished third 



in the shot put last season, also 
finished in that position in the 
competition last weekend with a 
throw of 42 -feet, eight and one-half 
inches. 

IF THE 'Cats have a surprise 
performance it could come from 
shot putter Melony Beneke, a 
junior who has made steady im- 
provement throughout the season 
and grabbed second in the KU 
Relays with a persona] best of 43- 
feet. one and one-quarter inches. 

"Melony is getting stronger and 
her technique is improving every 
week," Anderson said. "I don't 
know what she might come up with 
this weekend." 

Anderson was also high on Diane 
Moeller who high jumped a per- 
sonal best of five feet, seven inches 
in practice this week. 

Rounding out K-State's con- 
tingent will be Alice Wheat in the 
5,000 meters, and freshman long 
jumper Karesa Robbins who is 
coming back after foot surgery 
during the indoor season. 



Women sprinters 



enjoy 



• • • • 



season \ 



Intramural track champions 



Following is an incomplete list 
of results from the first day of the 
intramural track meet. The meet 
continues today with the events on 
the track starting at 4:00 and the 
field events at 4: 30. 

The independent 880-relay was 
won by the Zambini Brothers. 
Others in the top five were: 
Making Medicine (second), Last 
Chance (third), Machine (fourth) 
and AVMA (fifth). 

The independent mile was won 
by Edward Groden. Ralph 
Wilkinson of The Machine was 
second. Fecht was third and 
Hoenig of Mr. K's was fourth. 

Novak, Sullivan, Zuti and 
Whittemore finished in the top four 
places, respectively, in the 30 to 39 
year old faculty mile. 

Skidmore was the lone entrant in 
the 40 to 49 year old faculty mile. 

Schlender and Chet Peters 
finished one-two in the 50 to 59 year 
old faculty mile. 

QUALIFIERS FOR tomorrow's 
semifinals are: 

880-relay (fraternity): Phi 
Gamma Delta (1:38.4), Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon ( 1 : 38.4), Beta Theta 
Pi (1:35.7), Sigma Nu (1:33.4), 
Delta, Tau Delta (1:35.4), Delta 
Upsilon (1:35.8), Lambda Chi 
Alpha (1:37.5), and Acacia 
(1:40.2). 

880-relay (women): Pi Beta Phi 
(2:13.0), Alpha Chi Omega 
(2:11.1), Gamma Phi Beta 



(2:03.1), Chi Omega (2:05.9), Ford 
3 (2:12.4) and Kappa Kappa 
Gamma (2:15.1). 

880-relay (residence hall): 
Haymaker 3 (1:42.7), Maria tt 2 
(1:42.4), Moore B&l (1:40.3), 
Edwards (1:32.2), Haymaker 9 
(1:39.5), Marlatt 5 (1:41.9), 
Marlatt4 (1:42.5) and Goodnow B. 

100-YARD DASH (women): 
Heat One- McNutt — Chi Omega, 
(14.2), Ring — Gamma Phi Beta 
(13.8), Pacey — Smurthwaite 
(12.7), Snyder (13.2), Branson — 
Pi Beta Phi (13.7), Burton— Kapa 
Delta U4.1), and Hiss — Clovia 
(14.4). 

Heat Two: Mugler — Smur- 
thwaite (14.3), Haidesty — Kappa 
Alha Theta (14.0), Bingham — 
Alpha Delta Pi (13.5), Halpin - 
Moore 3 ( 12.8) , Noble - Alpha Chi 
Omega (13.4), Evan — Kappa 
Kappa Gamma (13.7), Waletman 

Wildcats to host 
booming Sooners 

The K-State baseball team 
continues Big Eight conference 
division action this weekend as the 
Wildcats entertain Western 
Division leader Oklahoma at 
Frank Myers Field today and 
Saturday. Today's doubleheader 
starts at 1:30p.m. with Saturday's 
twinbill slated for 1 p.m. 



LINDY'S HAS PURCHASED 

M500 WORTH OF SALESMEN'S 

SAMPLES 

Save 25%40% off retail 

Children's -shei 3T-3, 6, 1, 10, 12, 14, ft 16 

Includes jeans, tops, suits, and sportswear 

ladies' — various sizes 

Includes jeans, all sportswear, and suits 

Men's— ihirtt, oH sportswear, and suits 

Brand names include Hanes, Maverick, 
Lee, and Wrangler 

$ 1500 SALE-Now going on of Lindy's 



% 



UNDY'S ARMY AND 
WESTERN WEAR 



231 Poyntz 

Mon.-Sat. 9: 30-*: 00 

Sun. 1:00-5:00 

Thurs. till 8:30 



Gamma Phi Beta (14.2) and 
Brinkman — Kappa Kappa 
Gamma (14.5). 

Heat Three: Koukal — Smur- 
thwaite (14.4), Peacock — Kappa 
Alpha Theta (14.0), Bining — 
Alpha Xi Delta (13.6), Karten - 
Clovia (13.0), Swarts — Goodwin 
(13.5), Wiess — Delta Delta Delta 
(13,8), Frost — Gamma Phi Beta 
(14.2) and Boyd — Kappa Alpha 
Theta (14.6). 

100-yard dash (fraternity): Heat 
One: Krisek — Phi Delta Theta 
(11.3), Lavendar — Delta Tau 
Delta (10.9), Grosbibiler — Delta 
Upsilon (10.9), Riordan — Delta 
(see RELAY on p. Jl) 



By FRANK GARDNER 
Contributing Writer 

One is tall. One is short. One is medium height All are as fast as 
frightened pronghorns springing across the prairie. 

"They are the most talented group of freshman sprinters we've ever 
had at K -State," said women's track coach Barry Anderson. 

Freda Hancock is tall and slender, a 19-year old fine arts major from 
Centennial High School in Pueblo, Colo.. She set a national high school 
record in the 220, was a three-time state champion in the 100 and 220 and 
won the state 440 title as a high school senior. 

Lorraine Davidson is short and cute. She doesn't look like a great 
sprinter at first glance. Her performances at Buhler High School ruin 
that first impression. She holds state records in the 100, 220 and 440. She's 
19 and an administration recreation major. 

Wanda Trent looks like a runner. She's medium height, slim and has a 
beautiful stride. A 20-year old transfer student in horticulture, she came 
to K-State on the advice of Clifford Wiley, KU's great sprinter. She had 
attended St Marys College in Maryland for one year. So far the three 
have teamed up to break seven school records. 

HANCOCK HOLDS the indoor records in the 300 (35.6) and the 440 
(56.0) Along with Trent, Davidson and Jan Smith, she owns both the 
indoor mile relay record (3:51.3) and the outdoor mile relay mark 
(3:50.6). 

Davidson holds the indoor record in the long jump (18 feet, four and 
one half inches) . This is the first year she has competed in the event and 
coach Anderson says, "with some technique refinement she'll jump 20 
feet" 

Outdoors, Davidson and Hancock teamed with Pat Osborn and Jan 
Smith to break the 440- relay record (45.6). Hancock has also run a school 
record 23.9 in the 200-meter dash which is her favorite event 

"They're versatile They can run 6Q's, 100's, 220's 440's and 880's," 
Anderson said. "A lot of talented sprinters don't like to work hard These 
girls do, and I think because of that the future's very bright for them." 



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thru Sunday, April 30 

ado available in Junction City 



TRAGEDY HAS 



Hardly the Sig Alphs had a chance to sober up from Paddy Murphy's arrival 
when the tragic news came, PADDY MURPHY IS DEAD! The Sig Alphs are just 
"hungover" from the news. They received the awful story last night from Pad- 
dy's wife, Lucy Pattie. According to Lucy, Paddy had been hiding in Kite's 
celler; and after finishing his 14th keg, he staggered upstairs to continue his 
search for Lucy. Paddy, being Irish, felt it was his duty to share his good fortune 
of 14 free kegs and announced "free beer downstairs." The patrons upon hearing 
the news, rushed downstairs, but nay, Paddy failed to get out of the way, he was 
trampled by the mob. And there on the floor of Kite's, he belched his last belch. 



Upon hearing of the tragic death of this famous founding father, the Sig Alphs 
sent word to all Sigma Alpha Epsilon chapters and to all the gutters in the coun- 
try to announce the funeral will be Saturday afternoon. Pallbearers will be Jack 
Daniels, Jim Beam, Johnny Walker and Pierre Smirnoff. The Rev. "Nasty*' 
Nass will conduct the ceremony. Funeral arrangements will be handled by 
Manhattan Garbage Control Co. and flowers from Drakester Floral. Several 
cases of vodka and grain alcohol have been ordered to aid in the mourning. The 
procession will pick up the honored guests Saturday at 2:30 as the Sig Alphs say 
their last goodbye to Paddy Murphy. 

POOR, POOR, PADDY 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frl„ April 28, 1978 



11 




ASK Needs You! 

Applications are available in SGS Office 
for an ASK Board Director and 
an ASK campus director. 

Applications due May 3 

THE BOARD DIRECTOR represents KSU on the 
ASK Executive Board which is the Policy 
making— decision board of ASK. 

THE CAMPUS DIRECTOR 

coordinates campus activities and 
keeps students organized and in- 
formed of legislation concerning 
Kansas schools. This is a paid 
position. 



h 4 



TOP QUALIFIERS... J. J. Miller, sophom»re In business administration, hands off 
to James Robinson, freshman in health, physical education and recreation, on 
their way to the fastest qualifying time In the independent division of the 880-relay 
in the intramural track meet Thursday. 

880-relay and dash qualifiers 



(continued from p. 10) 

Tau Delta (10.2), Busch - Delta 
Upsilon (10.5), Grant — Theta Xi 
(10.9), Voss — Beta Theta Pi (11.1) 
and Mallder — Alpha Tau Omega 
(11.4). 

Heat Two: Maggio — Phi Delta 
Theta (11.3), Wheeler - Phi 
Gamma Delta U1.0), Dean — 
Kappa Alpha Psi (10.8), Ford — 
Beta Theta Pi (10.2), Jones — 
Sigma Nu (10.5), Lowell — Theta 
Xi (10.9), Krizek — Acacia (11,2) 
and Howell Kappa Alpha Psi 
(11.4). 

Heat Three: Ensley - Tau 



Kappa Epsilon (11.4), FUley — 
Sigma Nu (U.l), Heeney — Phi 
Gamma Delta (10.8), Brown — 
Sigma Phi Epsilon (10.4), Barrett 

- Delta Tau Delta (10.7), Greer— 
Sigma Chi (10.9), Linville — Alpha 
Tau Omega (11.2), and Williams — 
Pi Kapa Alpha (11.5). 

100-yard dash: Heat One: Evans 

— Haymaker 3 (11.9), Johnson — 
Haymaker 9 (11.7), Stroda — 
Mariatt 4 (11.3), Green — 
Edwards A (10.3), Hennelberg — 
Moore B&l (11.2), Armagost — 
Haymaker 4 (12.7) and Rath — 
Moore B&l (12.2). 



Heat Two: Hodgbison — 
Haymaker 5 (12.0), Comptau — 
Godnow 5 (11.7), Merrill — 
Mariatt 2 (11.5), Succ - 
Haymaker 9 11.02), Hill — Mariatt 
2 (11.2), Craghead — Edwards B 
(11,5). and Barber — Mariatt 5 
(12.1). 

Heat Three : Babcock — 
Haymaker 9 (12.0), Manaku — 
Moore 5 ( 1 1 .7 ) , Swartz — Mariatt 4 
(11.5), Cormade Goodnow 1 (11.0), 
Pezza — Mariatt 3 (11.3), Adams 
— Haymaker 3 (11.6), Gatterry — 
Mariatt 5 (11.7), and Mall — 
Moore B&l (12.2). 



IF YOU HAVENT BEEN TO... 

MRMS 



YOU HAVENT BEEN TO AGOIEVILLE! 

dp This And Join The 
Crowd At Mr. K's This Weekend! 




JUST OUR WAY OF SAVING 'THANKS, KSU!* 



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CONGRATULATIONS NEW 


TAU BETA PI 


Members 


Marc Baker 


Douglas Little 


Gary Breipohl 


Ray Magill 


William Bowling 


Jeffery McKenzie 


Dave Duensing 


Daniel McWhorter 


Jeff Finley 


Kenneth Meitl 


Brad Halfpap 


Steve Moser 


Donald Hinson 


Philip Neff 


James Holub 


Frank 0'Toole 


Carl Ice 


Page Puckett 


Scott Kessler 


David Rogers 


Hussein Khalil 


Catherine Sabatka 


Steve Kirchhoff 


Michael Schwarz 


John Kulman 


Samson Stull 


Margaret Yaegle 


National Engineering Honor Society 



11 



KAUNAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri., AprH 28, 1 978 



Study on bread additives gets grant 



K-State food scientists have 
received a $100,000 grant from the 
U.S. Department of Agriculture to 
study the effects of adding 
vitamins and minerals to wheat 
flour, com meal and other cereal- 
based products. 

The project is based on a 1974 
recommendation by the Food and 
Nutrition Board (FNB) of the 
National Research Council. 

The FNB proposed all wheat, 
corn and rice-based foods be 
fortified with calcium, vitamin A, 
vitamin B6, folic acid, magnesium 
and zinc in addition to the four 
nutrients currently added to bread 
for enrichment. 

The FNB's recommendation is 
based on review of nutritional 
studies conducted throughout the 
United States. The study showed 
women of child-bearing age, in- 
facts and older men are deficient 
in the nutrients listed in the 
proposal, said Joseph Ponte In- 
state professor of grain science 
and industry. 

The recommendation did not 
include the feasibility of im- 
plementing the indicated for- 
tification, he said. 

THE PURPOSE of the K-State 
project is to determine if it is 
possible to implement the proposal 
without affecting the quality of the 
product. 



The addition of nutrients to 
processed began in the 1940's after 
the Committee on Food and 
Nutrition (now the FNB) and the 
National Research Council 
recommended that flour and 
bread be enriched with thiamin, 
niacin, riboflavin and iron. 

"Prior to enrichment, medical 
school professors would take their 
students to skid row in the larger 
cities to allow the students to 
observe the extreme effects of 
vitamin deficiency diseases," 
Ponte said, 

"Since we began enriching 
bread, those diseases have 
become almost non-existent, event 
on skid row," he said. 

The new fortification standards 
are based on nutritional studies 
made since the 1950's. Since then, 
members of the FNB and the 
nutrition community have kept an 
eye on the nutrition of this country, 
because eating habits have been 
changing, Ponte said. 

"Today we eat fewer formal 
meals, we have a greater variety 
of foods available and, of course, 
we have new information 
available on nutritional 
requirements along with im- 
provements in food technology," 
he said. 

"People today eat more refined 
foods, more convenience foods," 



said Beth Fryer, professor of foods 
and nutrition and principal in- 
vestigator in the K-State study. 

THE TYPE of work people do 
has changed along with their 
eating habits. 

"Most people require less food 
energy today than they required 
just 20 years ago, because our 
work has become more seden- 
tary," Ponte said 

A factor in the recommendation 
is the discovery of new nutritional 
requirements such as zinc. 

"Only recently have we become 
aware that human beings could 
experience zinc deficiency. But a 
recent study in Denver concluded 
that a deficiency of zinc had 
caused stunted growth in children 
and hair changes is adults," Fryer 
said. 

Grain products were chosen for 
the fortification treatment since 
approximaUey 27 to 30 percent of 
the calories in the average human 
diet come from cereal grain 
products, said Donald Parrish, 
professor of biochemistry . 

The project includes the effect of 
the various nutrients on flour and 
dough properties— mixing colors 
and the physical properties of the 
dough, as well as their effect on 
flavor, volume, color and texture. 

K-State scientists also plan to 
conduct a study on the stability of 



Walton nabs firsts, trophies 
for K-State's speech squad 



BY DEBBIE NEFF 

Contributing Writer 

"A hologram is a three- 
dimensional light projection," said 
Steve Walton, junior in prelaw 
speech and member of K -State's 
Speech Unlimited Squad. 

Walton used his speech on 
holograms to win first place in 
informative speaking at the 
American Forensics Association 
( AFA) toumment two weeks ago in 
Normal, 111. 

"I've been successful mainly 
because I convinced the physics 
department to let me use a 
hologram," Walton said. 

The image is that of a young girl, 
Walton said, "she blows kisses and 
winks." 

Walton also placed second in 
oratory and fourth in com- 
munication analysis at the AFA 
tournament. He used no visual 
aides in these events. 

AT THE National Forensics 
Association (NFA) tournament 
last week in Monmouth, N.J., 
Walton took first place in ex- 
temporaneous speaking, placed 
third in impromptu speaking, and 
sixth in the pentathalon (a sum 
total of five events.) 

"It's so easy for him," said 
Lynee Ross, forensic coach and 
instructor in speech. "Some of the 
other kids just work their tails off 
and he spends half the time and 
goes in and snows them all. " 

Walton has been on the K-State 
speech squad for two years. He 
went to 16 tournaments and won 41 



trophies, 19 of which were first 
place awards. 

"That's pretty good," Walton 
said. "That's more than one first 
place per tournament. I guess I'm 
pretty lucky." 

In addition to his informative 
speech on holograms, Walton does 
an oratory (persuasive speech) 
examining the state of mental 
health care. 

"Like a lot of other people who 
saw the movie, 'One Flew Over the 
Cuckoo's Nest,' I was pretty 
disturbed," Walton said. "So I 
decided to find out if that sort of 
thing really happens." 

WALTON WAS also successful 
this season in communication 
competition analysis. 

"This involves taking a piece of 
communication and analyzing it to 
see if it achieved the effect the 
writer meant it to have on the 
audience," Walton said. 

Walton's final two events are 
improvisational. In ex- 
temporaneous speaking, a con- 
testant is allowed to pick from 
three topics and is given 30 minutes 
to prepare his speech. 

"Most tournaments give you one 
topic on social issues, one on 
political Issues and one on in- 
ternational affairs," he said. 

Walton's first place ex- 
temporaneous speech at the NFA 
tournament dealt with the 
question, "Is Begin the major 
obstacle to peace in the Middle 
East?" 



In the final impromptu round of 
the NFA tournament, all con- 
testants were given the same topic. 
Each speaker had one and one-half 
minutes to prepare and five and 
one-half minutes to deliver his 
speech. 

In impromptu speaking, "you 

have to be really quick," Walton 
said. "You just have to have con- 
fidence that something will pop out 
of the miasma of thought you have 
about the topic." 

Walton plans to continue com- 
peting on the K-State speech squad 
during the spring semester of 1979. 




Mopeds— The only way 
to go to school. 



Mr. Moped 

312 S. 3rd 
1-5 M-F 9-6 Sat. 




COUPON OFFER 




Coupon Void 
After April 30, 1978 



Vi PRICE 

D.Q. Regular Hot Dog 

Just choose a regular Hot Dog any regular 
Hot Dog and rfs yours for half jhe regular 
price. 



Coupon valid only at all participating 
"Dairy Queen" stores within the state of 
Kansai. 



Dairy 
Queen 



i 



the nutrients in the food, and 
animal studies to see the 
variations in animals fed the 
fortified bread, as compared with 
enriched bread, unenriched bread 
and whole wheat bread. 

Researchers have, so far, found 
the additional nutrients cause 
little change in the quality and 
taste of the products, but increases 
nutritional values. 

Preliminary data indicates flour 
fortified with the new level of 
nutrients may be superior to whole 
wheat bread as far as the human 
body's utilization of certain 
nutrients is concerned. 



PINBALL 
CONTEST 

Prizes for the three 

best players. Contest 

ends May 15 



PARLOUR 

1123 Moro— Aggie vi lie 



c 



\ 



ommunications 
Specialties 

L IMITED 



Blue Hills 



of Manhattan 



776-7292 



Car Stereo 
Home Computers 



CB Radio 

Amateur Radio 

Background Music 

Public Address 

Jjm-Pak Electronic Components 

1/10/ Discount to Students with K.S.U. 
I U /O I.D. Card During May 






HELP WANTED! 



CONSUMER RELATIONS 
BOARD DIRECTOR 



Qualifications : Knowledge of consumer 
problems, consumer protection agencies and 
arbitration proceedings. 

Responsibilities : Supervision of students 
enrolled in "Consumer Relations Prac- 
ticum," complaint handling and ad- 
ministrative duties. 



Applications and more information are available 
at the SGS office. Applications are due noon, Thurs., 
May 4. 

SGS is an Equil Opportunity Employer. 



K- Stale Mayers 

linsntts 



TARTUFFE 



• Rag. VM. f*»l. Off. Am. D. Q. Carp. 
<© Copyright 1174, Am. D. Q. Corp 



1015 N. 3rd 








K.U1S.IX Stale I IIIUTNIIV 

Ihjit.ol Speech I heanv I'nufrani 

April 2H.2Ut.1U IffTH McCain Auditoiriuin Kpm 

H>r Risen at mm is 532-6425 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frt, April a«,1 978 



ft 



Landscape office 
^ director named 

Larry Wilson, a 1962 K-State 
graduate in landscape ar- 
chitecture, has been named 
director of landscape and campus 
planning for the University, ef- 
fective July 1. 

Wilson has been an urban 
designer with the Louisville, Ken. 
and Jefferson County Planning 
Commission since 1974. 

He will head the new Office of 
Landscape Architecture and 
Planning created as part of the K- 
State facilities planning and 
operations staff. 

"Wilson will coordinate all 
campus landscape planning, 
design, and construction," ac- 
cording to Paul Young, vice 
president for University Facilities. 
"He will work under the im- 
mediate supervision of Gene Cross, 
KSU director of facilities. 

"We have not had a full time 
staff," Young said. "It's the 
beginning of the program. We hope 
to have success with it." 

The selection committee had the 
names of several extremely 
qualified people, Young said. 

"They were very much im- 
pressed with Wilson's approach to 
planning and his long-range views 
of plans." 

HE PLACED emphasis on the 
accomplishment of the landscape 
design, Young said. 

Wilson also showed interest in 
the unifying and identifying the 
campus. Along Manhattan Ave. the 
campus is clearly defined by a wall 
and gateposts. But along Denison 
Ave. there is no such in- 
dentification of the campus. 

"When do you know when you 
really come on the K-State cam- 
pus? "Young said. 

Wilson was an associate planner 

for the Planning Commission in 

• Louisville from 1966-1969. He 

rejoined the Commission in 1974 as 

a urban designer. 

He is a registered landscape 
architect in both Kansas and 
Kentucky and is an active member 
in the Kentucky chapter of the 
American Society of Landscape 
Architects. 

Lawyers indicted 
in insurance fraud 

TOPEKA (AP)-A federal 
grand jury has returned a 12-count 
indictment against four Kansas 
City, Mo., lawyers alleging they 
conspired with doctors and others 
to defraud insurance companies 
by filing false and fraudulent 
injury and damage claims. 

The indictment, made public 
Thursday by James Buchele, U.S. 
attorney for Kansas, names as 
defendants Ariel Tager, Arthur 
Katz, David Crockett and James 
Phillips. 

It said the four operated a law 
firm together "to represent in 
dividuals involved in accidents, 
primarily automobile, in pressing 
claims against insurance 

carriers." 

Identified in the indictment but 
not named as defendants were Dr. 
Richard Wasserman, a Kansas 
City osteopath, and Rodney Alsop, 
Kansas City chiropractor. 



Collegian 
Classifieds 



CLASSIFIED RATES 
On* day: 20 words or less, $1.50, 5 
cents per word over 20; Two days: 
20 words or lets, $2.00, 8 cents per 
word over 20; Three days: 20 words 
or less, $2.25, 10 cents per word 
over 20; Four days: 20 words or last, 
$2.75, 13 centa per word over 20; 
Five days: 20 words or less, $3.00, 
1 5 cents par word over 20. 

Cleat If led a are payable In advance unless 
client has an esitbHsherJ account wlltt Student 
Publications 

Deadline it 10 a.m. day before publication to 
a.m. Friday lor Monday paper . 

Hems found ON CAMPUS can be advertised 
FF4EE tor a period not exceeding three day*. 
They can be placed at Kedile 103 or by calling 
53M6SS. 



Dttplay C la t (If led Rale* 
One day: S2 00 par Inch; Three days: S1 85 per 
Inch; Five daya: 11. SO par Inch; Ten days: Si 60 
per Inch. (Deadline it 5 p.m. 2 days before 
publication.) 

Classified advertising la available only to 
those who do not discriminate on the basis ol 
race, color, religion, national origin, sex Of ar- 
eas try 



SUBLEASE 

JUNE JULY: nice, large one-bedroom, furnished 
apartment. Air conditioned, lull kitchen, 
balcony. Across afreet from campus on N. 
Manhattan. Call 778.3296 (137 1451 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom luxury apartment 
Close lo campua/Aggieville Dishwasher, gar- 
bage disposal, laundry facilities, balcony. 
Rent negotiable. 537 2194 (139-148) 

SPACIOUS TWO bedroom apartment for sum- 
mer— furnished, air, balcony, off-ttreel 
parting, one block from Aheam, rent 
negotiable. Call 532-S831 (140-149) 

SUMMER-SPACIOUS four bedroom house. 
two car garage, 1 Vt hatha, partially furnished, 
nice area. Call Randy at 7 76-0478 (140-145) 

FOR SUMMER: Two bedroom furnished luxury 
apartment, close lo campus, central air. dish- 
washer, laundry facilities No pelt. Call 537- 
1218.(140-149) 

SUMMER WILDCAT 14, across from Aheam. 
One bedroom, furnished, air conditioning. For 
early lease and August, call 776-3784. (141- 
145) 

MAV 22nd— July 31 One bedroom air con- 
dllloned, furnished Wildcat apartment, two 
southside balconies, across from Aheam, 
1 1 30 monthly Call 5374031 . (141-145) 

SUMMER— AIR conditioned, laundry, across 
from Aheam, two three people. Wildcat Inn Jr. 
1130 537 8626 (141 145) 

SUMMER: SPACIOUS two bedroom house. 1/2 
block Irom campus and Agglevllle, good lor 
three, furnished or unfurnished, II 85. Call 
Wade. 539 5335 alter 5:00. (141-1 45) 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom carpeted apartment, 
central air, dlshweeher. Close to campus Per- 
fect tor threa persons Available May 22. 537- 
8764.(141-145) 

SMALL APARTMENT tor one person tor Bum- 
mer only. Furnished, air conditioned, car- 
peted, modern 185 per month, utilities paid. 
Call 537-4123.(142-146) 

AVAILABLE MAY t,fumlehedroom wllhacceat 
to entire house Also sublease two furnished 
rooms tor summer. Cheap 537-2681. Bruce. 
(142-146) 

SUMMER: ONE bedroom apartment across from 
Aheam, furnished, air conditioning. Call 776 
3639.(142-148) 

FOR JUNE and July, one bedroom good tor two, 
S100. Two bedroom good for three, 1150. Four 
bedroom. (200. Near campus Call 537-0428 
(142-151) 

HOUSE FOUR bedroom, two bathe, dish 
washer, carpeted, lots of windows, one block 
to campus, very nice, S30uVmonth, 537-7213. 
(144-148) 

FURNISHED AND carpeted apartment Good for 
one-three people. Convenient location Call 
776-3488, rent negotiable (144-148) 

HOUSE: TWO bedroom, remodeled house 
Three blocks from campus Some furniture 
OM street parking 1200 plus utilities Cell 776- 
3792 or 776*890 (144 148) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT #4, across from Aheam 
Nice one bedroom, furnished apartmertl, air 
conditioning, two balconies, f 130/month. Call 
7760202 (144-148) 

SUMMER WILDCAT Seven. IVi blocks from 
campus. One bedroom, air conditioned, fur- 
nished, carpeted, two balconies, laundry. 1125 
monthly. Call 7760863. (144-146) 

HURRY. HURRY I House— One block from 
Aggievllla and 1/2 block to campus. Nicely fur- 
nished, two bedrooms; two to lour people, air 
conditioning, large yard and oil street 
parking 537 7092 (144-146) 



THREE BEDROOM house, furnlahed, air con 
dittoned. big yard, only two blocks from cam- 
put, negotiable. Available May 20 537-1445 
(142-146) 

SUMMER: FURNISHED luxurious, large 
bedroom comlortaMe for three. Ml block from 
campus, negotiable price I Coachiamp. 1225 
Clanin. Roxi, 539461 1 , #332. (1 42-1 46) 

SUMMER— FOUR bedroom house Air con- 
ditioned, laundry, eaay access to campus, en- 
closed yard, nice tree. Price negotiable. Call 
Jeff or Jay, 5394423; Tom (103) or Chuck (101) 
at 5394211 (143145) 

HEY I SUMMER: i Vi bedroom, accommodate 
two-three people easily, great location near 
campus, shag, cable, air conditioning, 
liable. Call 5 



t yiin iiii i m 



negotla 



15324787 (143-147) 



SUMMER-ONE bedroom apartment across 
from campus. Two or three people. Dish- 
washer, air conditioned, balcony Cell 776- 
4329 after 500 p.m. (143-147) 

SUMMER: IVi bedroom. Air conditioned Close 
to campus 1 212 Thurston 537-2282 (1 43-147) 

AVAILABLE MAY 22 Close to campus. 
11 10/month. Carpeted, central air, cable TV, 
laundry facilities. Call 537-2084. (143-148) 

AVAILABLE MAY 22. Close to campus, 
fl 10/mnnih Carpeted, central air, cable TV, 
laundry facilities. Call 537 2094. (143-146) 

MAY 20 July 31. Furnished two bedroom apart 
ment, central air, three beds, dlshwaaher, 
laundry I acuities, reserved parking, close 
campua/Aggieville 539-7864 (143-147) 

NICE, ONE bedroom furnished apartment. Wild 
cat IV, scroti from Aheam, » ISO/month Call 
5374718 (143-145) 

SUMMER— TWO bedroom furnished apartment. 
Half block from campua, air conditioning, 
wether. S150 per month plus utlllllet, 1214 
Ralone. 5374309. (143-149) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT VI, acroaa Irom Aheam 
One bedroom, central air, furnished, carpeted, 
laundry. Early occupancy available Only 61 20 
monthly 7760964 (143-147) 

SUMMER: EXTRA large luxury one bedroom 
apartment. Close to campus and Agglevllle. 
Balcony, shag, central air. Rent negotiable 
Call 5374989. (144-148) 

HOUSE: MAY 20 to September I, one bedroom, 

ilOO/month plut utilities, two blocks Irom 
campus, 537-4782. (145-146) 

(Continued on page 14) 



NEXT STOP 

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THE NEWEST, PINKEST 
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rit ii i. h.i ii-ii 

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w I -eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee COMING aeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeee, 

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COFFEEHOUSE 

Sunday, April 30, 8-10 

St. Isidore's 
Catholic Student Center 

711 Denison 

Featuring Chris Biggs, 
Full Crescent, Fred Soltero 

EVERYONE INVITED 



INTERSESSION (may 22- June 2) 

Registration: May 1, 2, 3 in K-State Union's Main 

Concourse from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 



For information call The Division of Continuing Education 

532-5566 



14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, FrL, April 28, 1978 



(Continued Irom page 13} 

SUMMER-SMALL mm badroom fumlahad 

apartment. Mr conditioned. exo*ll*nl location, 
IllOftnonth, all utility paid 537-7593. (144- 

JUNE JULY tumtaned twc-bedroom apartment 
tw three on North Manhattan Avenue Air coo 
dMoned, carpeted Call Tammy 438, Putnam 
Halt. 044-148) 

MONT BLUE duplex wtih all corweniencee tor 
summer. Two bedroom*, two hatha, cantral 
Mr, ctoe* to campus. Negotiable. 537-6066. 
(144-148) 



FOR SUMMER-luxuriou* two ballroom i 
mani, tully fumlahad. air conditioning, dleh- 
•WW CtoM to campua. Rant negotiable. 
1010 Thurston, 5374473. (144-140 

RENT MCI (June-July) Nifty two badroom, Lun- 
dm Apartment*. Ona Mock Irom Ahaam, 

College Height*. Ntcaty fumlehed. modam 
kitchen, air conditioned, balcony. Rant 
negotiable. Call 532-3154 (144-149) 

END MAY-Juty 31, Wildcat Inn, Jr., Ona to thraa 
paraona. AcroaafAhaam. Carpeted, lumlahad, 

air conditioned, laundry. 1120 monthly. 537- 
0252 (144-148) 

SUMMER-FOUR badroom duplex, *T0 par par- 
•on. Air conditioning, dlehwaaher, two 
bathroom* Utilities paid, two block* from 
campua. 776J628 (144-146) 

WILDCAT VI— aarty and lata occupancy, acroaa 
Irom lleldbou**, ona badroom apartment, fur- 
nlahad, cantral air, laundry. 1130. 537-2342. 
(146-149) 

TWO BEDROOM apart mant. fumlahad, air con 
dltlonad, all electric, dlahweeher, half block 
from campuf on Clatlln, two-thraa paraona. 
MB monthly. Call 77*4147. (145-149) 

SUMMER: LUXURY two badroom apart mant 
with dlahweeher, cantral air, carpeting, and 
balcony. AcroM from Good now Hall. 
1 150/month. CaH 537-4722. (145-14B) 

COOL TWO badroom lumlahad baaamant apart- 
manl for those hot month*. Lurtdfn Apart 
mania, on* Mocfc «mi ol campua. Wei 
negotiable 7784304. (145-140) 

SUMMER: MONT Blue two badroom, luxury 
apartmanl. Air conditioning, laundry tacllltle*. 
Raducad tummar rata* Call John, 132 Marlatt 
Hall. 5304301. (145-147) 

MUST SUBLEASE— June and July— fumlahad 

Mont Blua apartmam. Air conditioning, car- 
pal, clot* to campua. Prtca negotlett*. 537- 
2878 Of 776-5821 (145-1 40) 

SUMMER, LARGE thro* badroom lumlahad 
apartmanl, comtortabla lor four, half block 
Irom campus, vary tow utlllllai, 1180 month. 
537-7073.(145147) 



NOTICES 

MANHATTAN PAWN Shop, 317 S. 4th Street, 
776-8112— *farao*. 8- tricks, TV 'a, 
typawrltara, guitar*, eamara*. Buy-**H-trede. 
(2t») 



CUSTOM MADE 14 kt goto wadding band* Win 
dttre Jewelry. 230 N. 3rd, Manhattan. (1 18tt) 

STEREO REPAIR-laal. reasonable compatont 
repair of moat brand*. Ovar 300 replacement 
needle* In stock The Circuit Shop, through 
the Record Store 776-1221 <12ltr| 

SLEEP, THE conqueror with a sign Sleep, tha 
dryar of tha crying ay* Slaap, Iha torgatlar. 
Sleep, m* craatton, on your waterbed from 
Ruah Slraat Station, 817 N Waahlngton, J.C. 
or Ruah Slraat Exchange. Aggtevllla. Manhal- 
tan. (141-140) 

JOANNE'S ALTERATIONS and Tailoring for 
man's and ladle*' Proraaatonai quality and 
service, with vary raaaonabta prlcee Ptoaaa 
call 530*065 (141-146) 

MULTI-FAMILY garag* tala. 410 Edgarton 
Ho near atarao ayatam Waahar-dryar oom- 
Nnetlon. onyx chaaa aat, typawrllar, antique 
cookwara, tools, book*, ate. Ram or antna, 
April 20 and 30, 0:004:00 p.m. (143-145) 

WEST HALL Carw ash -Saturday. April 20, 1«0- 
5-00 p.m. a( Union National Bank downtown. 
11.00 par car. Be there I (144-145) 

ALVAREZ QUfTARS olfar* you a saving of 
008.08 on accessories and service* when you 
purchase on* of their Una acoustics Vour 
local dealer I* String* 'n Thing*. 814 N. 12th, 
Agglevllle. 530- 2009 (144-150) 

TRAPPERS — KANSAS Fur Harvealar 
Association meeting Saturday. April 29. 11 00 
am Science Building, Emporia Slate Univer- 
sity More Information. Dennis, 532-5437. (144- 
145) 

FROZEN YOGURT on tap at Deity's Daughter, a 
natural food* restaurant. Made only with pur* 
whoteeome Ingredients 300 N. 3rd. Open 
Mon -Sat. 1100*00. 778*207 (145-149) 

VOU MAY save a lot ol money moving your 
■elf— but you'll also get lo pay tor anything 
that gel* broken. LHta any other type of in 
aurance, letting a professional mover lake 
car* of your move protect* you against costly 
replacement or repair of valuable belongings. 
Thar* are many other good reason* for tatting 
Hart Tranalar and Storage take cara of your 
ne«t move— but than, you probably know all 
aboul galling tha most for your money. Call 
778*033 for a tree estimate. From Hart of 
America to Anywhere In the World. (145) 

SERVICES 

RESUMES TYPESET, designed and printed by 
proles* Ion* I* gat raw It*. 100 impressions- 
117. Tha Offaat Praa* prlnta anything. 776- 

317 Houston, (23tf) 



RESUMES WRITTEN Irom scratch by 
proles* ion* I writer*. Your resume I* written, 
designed, typeset , printed. 100 copl*a/S25 
537-7868. (13*159) 

ATTENTION VW own*ra-w* are now open 
Monday through Saturday for your con 
vemence J t L Bug Service 1494-2368. St. 

George. (134-145) 

LET MY finger* do the typing I That hi, reports, 
resume*. Fast service, experienced typist 
June, 532*080 or 530-2424. (1 42 1 48) 



Ctossworxf By Eugene Sbeffer 



ACROSS 

lLand 

measure 
4'TTiis 

above—..." 

7 All, 

formerly 
11 Whig 

opponent 

13 Actress 
Grant 

14 Habitation 

15 Medley 

16 Sack 

17 "- a king 
in Babylon" 

18 Bills of fare 
20 Record 

22 Legendary 

bird 
24 Keepsakes 
28 Farm 

machine 

32 To resign 

33 Neighbor 
of Ore. 

34 Dance 
step 

38 Girl, in 
Seville 

37 Those 
opposed 

39 Apparition 
41 — and bonds 



43 Past 

44 Small 
violins 

48 Exclamation 

of surprise 
SO Canary's 

milieu 
53 Umpire's 

decision 
55 Companions 

of carrots 
58 Ready for 

business 

57 Parrot 

58 Satisfy 

59 Moistens 

60 Greek letter 

61 For each 
Avg. solution 



DOWN 

1 Small 
particle 

2 Stage part 

3 Ireland 

4 Vestment 

5 Go ahead 

6 On the up 
and up 
(slang) 

7 Farm sights 

8 Depressed 

9 Assoc, 
of MD's 

10 Affirmative 
12 "Do not 

count — 
before..." 
time: 25 mm. 




If Drunkard 

21 Turf 

23 Policeman 

(slang) 

25 Eject 

26 Baseball 
team 

27 Leading 
player 

28 "- the 
night 
before..." 

29 Rave 

38 Concerning 
31 Short-napped 

fabric 
35 Resort 
38 Travel 

over 

snow 
40 Urge on 
42 Feed a 

furnace 
45 Fat for 

cooking 

47 Jump 

48 Recent 

49 River in 
Belgium 

50 Intimidate 

51 Imitate 

52 Secure 
54 Chinese 

pagoda 




EXPERIENCED LAWN clean-up and main 
tenance Vary competitive prlca* Call Marvin 
at 7780391 or 537 7888. both aflar 500 p.m 
(141-145) 

VW BUG tune-up only 117.80 for 1982-74 beetle 
without air conditioning. (Add $3.50 lor air 
conditioning). J1L Bug Service, 1-494-2388, 
St George. (141145) 



SOUPENE'S 
COMPUTER 
ALIGNMENT 



114 South 5th 



776-8054 



NEED HELP In Economics? Call 537-4374. Rale* 
baaed on a multidimensional concept of 
utility. (144-145) 



ATTENTION 



HATER'S DRIVING School taking applications 
now. For Information call Key inc.. Manhattan. 
KS. 537*330. (109-155) 



LOST 



REWARD OFFERED for return of Tl calculator 
Sfi SO with black case Lo*l In 218 Calvin Mon 
day. Call Marc B49, 539*301. (143-148) 

GLASSES SATURDAY on bedrace pared* route. 
Call 530*211, Room 513, ask lor Phil (143- 
146) 

MONDAY NIGHT, large gray oal wllh black 
•trlpa*. Near Agglevllle Needs shot* 
Reward, call 537-4280 evenings, or leave word 
at 930 Laramie. (144-145) 



FOUND 



KEYS IN Kedlle 103, April 25 (143-145) 

NEW BOTTLE of Ian* cleaner left In Kedrie 103. 
Com* In and claim (143-145) 



PERSONAL 



THE TWELFTH commandment— Thou snail not 
provok* a nln|a lo anger S W (143-147) 

LVNN 458: Your two dimension*! attitudes were 
disconcerting to we northern ghettoites An 
apology I* In order. 536*301. ext. 203. (145) 

PUDDLE BUTT AND Olsco Donna, There'* no 
class on Monday, let'* make It our fun day 
Got nothing to do. *o how about a brew. We'll 
drink you under the labia. Steve end Sidekick 
(145) 

TO MY babe. Karen, I'm super psyched! Your 
Man. (145) 

C.B., THANKS lor the greatest sn months of my 
lit*. Love, your little Imp. (145) 

SIGS & Slgetles— Hope you can keep up with 
your old man this weekend— gel psyched! 
Wichita andtor bu*tl HI Dorothy! (145) 

WONDER LOAF, Now that you are rich and 
famous I hope you won't forget me 
Congratulation* love, I knew you could do III 
Love yaalwaya.Sugar Bear. ( 1 45) 

UNDA: SURPRISE! Happy ISOtht You should be 
more careful with overnight romances! Watch 
out for tha good ship Enterprise! Horseshoe 
(1451 

THANKS FOR your support In the election. The 
four for mora: Scott. Janet, Petty, Brian (145) 

CONGRATULATIONS PAADON us fo looting at 
own hawn. But, congratulations lo Pata Soma 
to what Is pa haps the best photo maag page 
to appea* In the Collegian this yea*. Few 
layout* have been so good that It I* im- 
passable to tell which photo I* best. Snep-e- 
tom, Animal. Canon Cartel, Wonda Loaf, Kan- 
sas Chicken Plucks, Rudolf Roiiel. (1 45) 

BILL— ARE we going to fall asleep at the Waldo 
Ilk* we do whan we welch Saturday Night 
Live? Love ya muchly! Your little cream pull. 
(145) 



WANTED 



TO BUY: Playboys, Ptayglrls, Penthouse, Oul, 
Gallery and other*. Comics, paperbacks, 
coins, stamps, mllitarla. antiques. Treasure 
Chest, Aggieville-Old Town Malt (129-155) 

WANTED. DEAD Or alive— VW'S needing 
repairs to buy. VW Rabbit or Scirroco. too. 
Call 1494-2368 enyllm*. (131-145) 

TYPING WANTED. Highest quality work: editing 
optional: extra large type available 11 wanted 
for speeches, visually Impaired. 5394876, 
5:00-9:00 p.m. (142-1 49) 

MARRIED COUPLE need ride to Norton April 29. 
Will help pay gas. Call Hflmar Bohn at 776- 
1049 *ft*r 6*0 p.m. (143-145) 

ANYONE MOVING to Tucson, Ariione In May? 
Would Ilka to share a U-Haul wllh someone 
that can pull ona. Call 537*240 (145-148) 

MOVING TO California, need someone to drive 
U-Haul truck Call 537*489 after 7:00 p.m. 
(145-149) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

SUMMER/FALL, females to share large fur- 

nlahed house, private bedroom*, mora too 
and up. Most bills paid 1005 Vainer and 1122 
Vatller 539*401 (12M 50> 

AVAILABLE MAY 1 til lall semester 170 plus ap- 
proximately 18 utilities Own bedroom, fur- 
nished, non smoker Close Call Patty, 539- 
3158 (138147) 

FEMALE TO share comfortable fumlsh*d apart- 
manl. Ona gal to )oln two others. Private 

room, air conditioning. 899. utilities paid. Call 
530-2663 or 776-0710 (140-149) 

ONE FEMALE to join three others In spacious 
apartment, main floor of large home, for sum 
mar. Close to campua. 875, utiltlle* paid. Call 
530-2883 or 539*329. (140-149) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE lo share Wildcat Inn apar- 
tment lor eummer Call Pam, 778*400. (141- 
145) 

FEMALE TO share nice, furnished spertment lor 
eummer with two glrle. Two blocks from cam- 
pua. S87 plus electricity. Call 532-5384. (143- 
147) 

LIBERAL ROOMMATE wanted. Close to cam 
pus Agglevllle. and park. Utiltlle* 
paM-tlOOfmonth. 778-7191. (145-148) 

LOOKING FOR ona or two roommates lor sum 
mer Private badroom, use ol swimming pool. 
Call 537*033. (145-1 49) 



FOR SUMMER: 170 month plus half utlllltet. 
Centrally located, between Agglevllle, park, 
and University Call Chris Biggs. 530-8827 af- 
ter 5:30. (143-145) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for summer and 
fall. Ona block from campua and Agglevllle 
Call 539-4901 (143-148) 

HELP: NEED two people to live In tour badroom 
house two blocks east of Ford. For June and 
July. Washer, dryer, dishwasher, otf street 
parking. Call 778-5507 or 537*327. (144-148) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share fumlahad ona 
badroom apartment. May 20th-August 23, 
tSSrmontti plus utilities. 1868 Clatlln 17. 539- 
8704.(144-148) 

FALL TWO tamalea needed to share two 
badroom, I wo bath, furnished duplex wllh two 
others toWmonlh Includes utilities. Close to 
campus Call 778-7339. (145-149) 



WELCOME 

MASSES AT Catholic Student Canter. 711 
OanJaon, 940 am., lOOO a.m.. 11:15 a.m., 
12:15 and 5:00 p.m Sundays, 4:30 p.m. week 
days; 5 00 p.m. Saturday*. (14S) 

FIRST LUTHERAN, 10th and PoynU; University 
students are Invited lo attend a Bible Study 
Group thai meets In the basement of the main 
building of Iha Church at 9:40 am on Sun 
daya; Worship Service al 8:30 a.m. and 1100 
a.m. Our Church Bus stops at Good now Hall 
at 10:35 am and al Boyd and West Halts at 
10:40 am for rides to services Milton J. 
Olson, Pastor f 145) 

COLLEGE HEIGHTS Baptist Church, 2221 
College Heights Road: Worship: 9:45 a.m. and 
7:00 p.m.: Bible Study: 11:00 a.m. Phone 539- 
3598 Bill Foil, Pastor. (145) 

GRACE BAPTIST Church, 2901 Dickens. 
welcomes you to Worship Services at 8:30 and 
1140am University Class meets at 9:45 a.m.; 
Evening Service, 7:00 pm Horace Brelslord, 
Kan Edtger 539*020 (145) 



FIRST 

PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH 

8th & Leavenworth 

Celebration of Worship 

9:00 and 11:00a.m. 

Judge Jerry Mershon will 

be giving the sermon, 

"Modem Laws and Old 

Commandments" 

University Class 
9:50a.m. 

"The Community of Christ" 

Sailing, Boating, Skiing with 

the University Class. Meet 

at the Church at 3 :30 p.m. 

WORSHIP ON campus at All-Faiths Chapel. 
10;46a.m. Evening service, 8.30 p.m. 1225 Ber 
I rand, the University Christian Church. 
Douglas Smllh, minlatar. We're un- 
denominational t (145) 

LUTHERAN— UMHE Campus Ministry Invites 
you to our 11:00 a.m. student worship al Dan- 
forth Chapel (on campual east of the Union. 
Ecumenical, international, student par- 
ticipation, • caring community. Phone 539- 
4451.(145! 

COME JOIN US! 

Worship and Study . 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
2121 Blue Hills Road 

Christian Education 

Classes 9: 45 a.m. 

Worship Service 

ll:00a.m. 

Free transportation- 
Call 537-7979 or 
Bell Taxi 537-2080 



CHURCH OF the Naiarene, 1000 Fremont. Sun- 
day School, 10:00 a.m.; Morning Worship. 
1 1:00 a.m.; Evening Service. 6:30 p.m.: Prayer 
Service. Wednesday. 7:00p.m. (145) 

ST. PAUL'S Episcopal Church. 8th and PoynU. 
welcome* you to Sunday services si 8:00 and 
1100 a.m.; weekdays at 5:30 p.m. Iran 
sportallon available. 778-9427 and 7788354. 

(145) 

WELCOME STUDENTS! First Christian Church, 
115 N. Sth. College class, 9:45 a.m.; Worship, 
11:00a.m. Ministers: Ben Doerfeldt, 539-8885: 
Bill McCutchen, 7769747 For trensporallon, 
call 778*790 before 9:00 a m. Sunday*. (145) 



You are invited to join us 
at the 

FIRST UNITED 

METHODIST CHURCH 

Sixth & Poyntz 

9:45 a.m. 'The Open Door" 

Dialogue and Study 

Temple building east 

of the church 

11 : 00 a.m. Divine Worship 

Rides Available 
Call 776-8821 



MISS THE *m*JI church almoaphere? Come 
worship with us. Heat* United Methodist 
Church, 8 mtlea weal of KSU on Anderson. 
Church, 900 a.m.; Sunday School, lOflO am. 
(145) 



MANHATTAN WESLEYAN Church, Poynbt and 
Manhattan. Worship ... 6:30 end 1055 am 
Sunday School . . . 9:45 a.m. A vital, biblical 
fellowship (148) 

PEACE LUTHERAN Church Invitee you to our 
8:15 am. and 1030 a.m. Sunday servtcee. Go 
one-hall mile wast ol new stadium on Kimball. 
Weare friendly (145) 

FOR SALE 

TANDY LEATHER kits, supplies, custom leather 
work. Special orders welcome. Black powder 
guns, accessories, supplies, equipment. Case 
knives, frontier, western accessories. Old 
Town Leather Shop Old Town Mall. 180tf) 

COINS, STAMPS, military relics, antique*, guns, 
•word*, paper, Americana, advartlalng 
memorabilia. Buy, Mil, trade. Treasure Cheat, 
Old Town Malt (8011) 

BUY -SELL Trade-records, (apes, coin*, books, 
comics. Playboys, other magazines 
Costumes available lo rent. Treasure Cheat, 
Agglevllle (SOU) 

NEW— WE have a * Ingle element electric 
typewriter wllh four different pitches— el lie, 
pica, proportional and mlcroellta. Hull 
Business Machines, 1213 Mora, Agglevllle 
(128tf) 

USED VW parts-beetle and (setback. 
squareback parts up to 1971. Body and 
mechanical. Call 1-494-2388. J4L Bug Service 
(13311) 

POSTERS, TAPESTRIES, used records, 
Ptsyboys, paper-back book*, comics. Beam 
bottles, beer tray*, glasses and mug*. 
Treasure Cheat. Agglevllle. (134-147) 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS programmable 
calculators All modal* In slock at low 
discount price*. One year factory warranty. Tl- 
58/59 solid slate software and TI-59 pattellas 
In stock. Programming asslsttnc* available 
5394958 (137-155) 

1978 HOMETTE. ' country kite hen," 14x70, two 
badroom. Includes washer and dryer, utility 
shed, skirted. Walnut Qrove. t-494-2324, (138- 
145) 

13x80 Esquire, with nice arrangement, two 
bedrooms, tully carpeted, furnished, central 
air and heat, overhead/tie downs, 10x10 shed. 
776-7092 (140-149) 

SUN HANG -glider— like new. Will give lesson*. 
Call attar 5:00 p.m. 1458-2528(141-150) 

1970 VOLKSWAGEN Bug, good mechanical 

condition, new snow Urea, AMfFM radio, 
dependable transports! ion, good gas mileage, 
7764250 alter 5:00 p.m. (141-145) 

1988 PLYMOUTH Fury III, good work car, needs 
some repair. Cheap, 1200 or best offer Call 
537-4923 sfter 5:30 p.m (142-149) 

10x50 GREAT Lake* mobile home. Partially lur 
nlahed wllh new Frtdgldaire refrigerator and 
stove Skirted and located at Colonial Gar- 
dene Mobile Home Park. *3,50O. 776-4050. 
(142-146) 

1986 VOLKSWAGEN, good condition, good gas 
mileage. Call 532-3878 after 4:30 p.m. and 
evenings. (142-148) 

ZENITH ALLEGRO 3000 modular system, 1973. 
AMfFM stereo, B-track, turntable. Excellent 
condition, great buy, 1250. Call 7780429 *\, 
before 3O0p.m. (142-1 46) 

1987 CUTLASS two-door coup*, S400 and ten 
speed bicycle Peugeot, nice. 840. Steve. 537- 
1445.(142-148) 

1975 HONDA CL360. Electric start, six-speed 
transmission, crash bsr. paddsd backrest. 
3000 miles, excellent condition, S825. 776- 
7204.(143-145) 

1987 VW bus wdh 1971 engine. Looks good, 
runs excellent, 5450. Call alter 5:30. 7784501. 
(143-145) 

LUXURIOUS 1976 Marquis Brougham with 
everything. Excel lent condition 16 mpg. low 
mileage 537-7240 alter 5:00 p.m (143-145) 

12x80 1989 Liberty. Furnished, tully carpeted, 
pels allowed, reasonably priced. 7764204. 
(1 43-145) 

1963 FLEETWOOD. 10x60 two bedroom, par- 
tially furnished with air conditioning, available 
after finals, 82500. 7763647 alter 5:00 (143- 
147) 

CAMPER: 8 loot Specexral! truck camper with 
stove, Ice box, water lank, and gas bottle. 537- 
6020 after 5:30 p.m. (143-1 47) 

TRIUMPH TR4A, 1967, must sell, a classic spor- 
ts car with spoke wheels, new top and metsltc 
blue paint, looks good, runs great, S1500 or 
best otter. See at northwest corner 3rd snd 
Bluemonl or 539-6985. (143-147) 

1978 12x84 mobile home, two bedroom, un- 
furnished. 539-5621, 9:00 a.m, -5:00 p.m. (143- 
145) 

1974 14x70 mobile home, three bedroom. Very 
nice. 539-5821,9:00* m 5«) p.m. (143-145) 

1969 12x60 mobile home. Iwo bedrooms, IVi 
baths. 539-5621, 9:00 e.m.-5:00 p.m. (143-145) 

4 ET aluminum slot wheels; 2-5.75x14, 27.50x14; 
185.7761629(143-145) 

1977 YELLOW Chevy Nova, vinyl top, loaded, ex- 
tra nice. Call 1485-2408 after 6:00 p m (144- 
145) 

USED GIBSON Les Paul Custom See at Strings 
n' Things, 614 H. 12th, Agglavlll*, 539-2009, 
(144-150) 

14X60 SCHULT mobile home, 1972. Two 
bedrooms. Includes: furniture, washer, dryar, 
sliding glass door, kitchen bay window, storm 
windows, double insulation. Call 539-9305 si 
ter 6:00pm, (144-150) 

1967 BUICK Wildcat convertible Iwo door, 
power brakes, power steering. 1200. 539-6393. 
(145) 

1972 CORVETTE Good condition, one owner. 
85 200 Tultte Creak Trailer Ct 838. 537-9410. 
(148-151) 

1989 NOVA two door. 307. excellent shape, nuts 
great, new Urea. 8895 or best otter Call bet- 
ween 5:30-7:30 p.m. 539-1683 (145-149) 

1974 CUTLASS Supreme— excellent condition 
All extra*, good price, super clean. Call 530- 
5036 alter 5:30. 1144-146) 

8x43 MOBILE home, skirted, w**h*r. shed, on _ 
Ml, good condition, $1800— Call between ■ 
430*00 p.m -778*476. (144-148) 

1970-73 Trans Am Spoiler (front center), and 
trailer hitch for Firebirds 1970-73 Also Clble 
Z-Beem driving lights, and * used battery. 537 
8358. (144-145) 



(Continued on peg*) 15) 



r 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri., April 28, 1970 



15 



(Continued from 



14) 



I 



FIVE STENORETTE dictating michMi, on* 
portable slsnorette, miscellaneous ac- 
cessories Sail to the highest bidder Bids 
close May 8, 10TB. Can be Men at Student 
Financial Assistance. Falrchild Hall, Room 
104, KSU. Call 5324420. (144.149) 

1972 YAMAHA (150x52, 1500 miles on overhaul 
Runs excellent Good condition, muat sell, 
Call 5374341. |1 44-148) 






! 






I 



« 



JUNIORS 



TOP SALE 

4 Days Only 

Wed. thru Sat. 

Junior— Shirts, 
Blouses & T-Shirts 
Many styles- 
good selection 

20% OFF 



LUCILLE'S 

Westloop 



12x50 MOBILE home, fully carpeted, except lor 
kitchen, central air and heating. 91 3494-231 5, 
Walnut Oroya Trailer Park. (1 45-155) 

12x00 LIBERTY mobile home, 1989, three 
bedroom, fully carpeted, air condllloned, ap- 
pliance*, skirted, nice lot, utility shed, good 
condition, 5374488. (145) 



Lindy's has purchased $1500 
worth of salesmen's sam- 
ples. Save 25-40% off retail. 

CHILDREN'S-sizes 3T-3, 6, 8, 10, 
12, 14, & 16. Includes jeans, tops, 
suits, and sportswear. 
LADIES'— various sizes includes 
jeans, all sportswear, and suits. 
MEN'S— shirts, all sportswear, 
and suits. Brand names include 
Hanes, Maverick, Lee, and 
Wrangler. 

$1500 SALE— 

Now going on at 

LINDY'S ARMY AND 

WESTERN WEAR. 

231 Poyntz 

Mon.-Sat. 9:30-6:00 

Sun. 1:00-5:00 

Thurs, till 8:30 



1987 CLASSIC Camero SS 350/295 HP. 22 MFG. 

New ax h aust and paint, air conditioned, 
power, disc, lilt wheel, told down rear seat. 4- 
speed with PoslTrac. Much more. 778-9721. 
(144148) 

1970 VOLKSWAGEN Bug Good mechanical 
condition Good gas mileage. Dependable 
AM FM 8 track. Call evenings 537 4335. (144- 
148) 



* New Homes for Sale 

* Used Homes for Sale 

* Financing Available 



WOODY'S MOBILE 
HOME SALES 

2044 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 

Manhattan, Kansas 66502 

913-539-5621 



USED BROTHER electric typewriter Excellent 
condition $90. Call 5394427. (144-146) 



HELP WANTED 



OVERSEAS JOBS — Summerlyeer round. 
Europe, S America, Australia. Aala, etc. All 
fields. 150041200 monthly, an pens** paid, 
sightseeing. Free Information. Write: BHP 
Co , Box 4490. Deot KB. Berkeley. CA 94704 
(128-147) 

AGGIE STATION Is taking applications for 
waitresses or wallers and kitchen personnel. 
Apply In person— 1 1tS Moro, alter 2:00 p.m. 
(140-145) 

SUMMER OPPORTUNITY One of the Midwest's 
oldest moving and storage lirms now ac 
ceptlng applications for household -floods 
packers A part-lime— full-time summer |ob, 
lull days required. Apply In person at 12905 
West 63rd Street, Shawnee. KS or call 1-631- 
1440. An equal opportunity employer (141- 
145) 

SUMMER OPPORTUNITY One ol the Midwest's 
oldest moving and storage firms now ac- 
cepting applications tor summer em- 
ployment. Long hours and hard work required. 
Looking tor household floods movers and 
he! pets. Musi be 18. Driving anperlence help- 
ful but not required Apply In person at 12905 
West 63rd Street, Shawnee, KS. An equal op- 
portunity employer. (141- 145) 

K-STATE UNION Is taking applications tor 
sec rate rial assistant lor the 1978-79 academic 
year. FIvelen hours a week. Minimum wage 
Apply Union Activities Center. April 24 
through 28th. An equal opportunity employer. 
0B00. (142-145) 

COMBINE/TRUCK operators for custom harvest 
June frJuty 10. Excellent hourly wage plus 
board and room. Late model equipment. 
Possible all summer employment. 319-257- 
2759. Lee Schotitler. Starling, KS 67579. (142- 
146) 

DRUMMER FOR rock group. Steady work after 
June 15. Serious Inquiries only Call Randy, 
537 7736 efter 5:00 pm (143-147) 

WAITRESSES OR waller* and bartenders Call 
539-9753 after 1 2:00 noon. (1 43-150) 

BROTHER'S TAVERN. Doorperaon. floor- 
walkers and bartender* lor the summer. Apply 
In person at Brother's. (144-145) 

STUDENTS, WOULD you be Interested In a part- 
time business that can provide an unlimited 
Income and financial independence? would It 
be worth an hour of your time lo look at our 
programs? If interested, call 776-1685 for an 
appointment (144-145) 



The Dairy Queen 

at 1015 N. 3rd 

is now accepting 

applications 

for full and 

part-time summer 

employment. 

Contact Mr. Fry 
at 776-4117 



DIRECTOR'S POSITION for Consumer Relation 
Board. 20 hours per week. Must have 
knowledge of consumer problems end 
avenues of settlement Applications available 
In SGA office and must be returned by noon. 
Thursday, May 4th. to the SGA office (990) 
((45-146) 



TUTORS! THE K.S.U Special Service* Program 
la currently seeking tutor* for next lali. Rale 
of pay: I3.50mour for group tutors: t2.75mour 
tor Individual tutors. Qualifications: 3 G P. A 
In subject are*, dependable, courteous, and 
ability lo communicate with other* ol various 
backgrounds If interested, attend group In- 
terview In K-Stale Union, Room 206-A, 
Tuesday, May 2nd, 4:00 p.m.— or -Wed 
nesday. May 3rd, 1 1:00 a. m , Room 208- A. For 
more detail*, cell 5324439. Kansas State 
University la an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative 
Action Employer (144-146) 

BARTENDER PART lime, evenings. Bockera II, 
Rameda Inn. Apply In person al Office 525. 
(144-146) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: require hard working 

students. Involves bookkeeping, marketing, 
end Inventory No experience necessary, 
willing lo relocate. 537-9014, after 540 p.m. 
(144-153) 

CAMP COUNSELORS Private boys/girls camps 
need swimming (W.S.L). tennis, riflery, gym 
nasilcs, riding, selling, water skiing, guitar. 
cratti , archery, golf, drama, camping, office, 
nurse, kitchen help Minimum age 19. Lauren- 
ce Seeger. 1795 Maple. North Held. Illinois 
-1.(145) 



SUMMER EMPLOYMENT-and May through 
September— truck/combine driver* needed 
for custom harvesting. Contact Steve 
Schneider, 913436-7225, Lincoln, KS 67455 
(145-155) 

NOTICE TO college grads or people with ex- 
perience. W* are looking for a sarious-mlnded 
Individual reared on a (arm and who likes 
working with cat lie and hogs. Also needs 
mechanical talents. Must be able to assume 
responsibility Metzger Farms and Fertilizer 
Service, Box 27, Oneida. KS 65522, attn 
Douglas Meuger 913-336-3958 or 336-3673 
(145) 

LPN'S-RN'S 

3:00p.m. -11:00 p.m. 

11:00-7:00 a.m. 

shifts 

Full and Part-time 

Positions Available 

Generous Salaries 

Apply in person 

College Hill Skilled 
Nursing Center 

2423 Kimball 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

PROMOTIONS EXPERIENCE— The K-State 
Union Program Council Concerts Committee 
Is looking for a Promotion* chairperson for 
the 1976-79 concert season. This volunteer 
position will entail planning all PR campaigns 
and design of all promotional material. The 
completion of these area direct responsibility 
of this position. This position provide* • great 
chance to build • portfolio Graphic design ex- 
perience I* helpful but not neceasary. For 
more information contact: Myron Molzen (778- 
7194) or Rob Ciesiich I si 532-6571 . or come up 
lo the Activities Center on the third floor of 
the KStsta Union. Application deadline la 
5:00 loday. Make UPC Concerts a part of your 
life! (10041(145) 

DORM SUPERVISOR for K.S.U. Upward Bound 
Program. 7 week program (June 5Jury 21). 
S200rweek. room and board provided. 
Qualil leal ions: minimum of bachelor's 
degree Send letter of application to: Tom 
LaMlter, Director, Upward Bound Program. 
Kansas State University, Falrchild 212. 
Manhattan. KS 66506. 532-6440 Application 
deadline: May 15, 1978 Kansas Slate Univer- 
sity Is an Equal OpportunltyiAflirmatlve Ac 
lion Employer. (145-147) 



FOR RENT 

TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electrics and manuals, 
day, week or month. Suzzells, 511 Leaven 
worth, across trom post office. Call 776-9469. 
(HI) 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS; excellent selection 
Hull Business Machines. 1212 Moro. 539-7931. 
Service most makes ol typewriters Also Vic- 
tor and Olivetti adders, (i tf) 

LARGE. NICE, furnished apartment. Three 
male* Private. Parking. Reasonable. Knolty 
pine wails Large bedroom, single beds. For 
fall. 776-8897. (1*0-1 49) 

SPACIOUS AND Sunny three bedroom apart- 
ment In home Need onetwo female room 
male* for tall 1978. 170 includes water and 
heat. Call 7764098 evening* (142-145) 



ONE, TWO, three bedroom furnished, un- 
furnished a pan men Is for summer/fall. 10 or 12 
month contracts. No pets, 537-6360 (1 19tf) 

JUNE AND July only. Two bedroom furnished 
luxury apartments near Aggieville No pet*. 
Three or four tingle students f 150. Call Rich 
after 5:00 p.m. 776-1486. (1 33-146) 

A BEAUTIFUL targe four bedroom furnished 
apart menl with a large screen porch nee/ cam- 
pus. Good for four-six Water, trash and 
heeling bills paid. Nopals. Call 537-0428. (136- 
145) 

FURNISHED, AIR conditioned, carpeted, one 
end two bedroom apartments near campus, 
reasonable rant tor summer— fall. Afternoons 
539-4904.(136-145) 

A BEAUTIFUL carpeted two bedroom furnished 
apartment near campus, good lor three, $220 
One bedroom good for two, 1155. Water, traah 
and heating bills paid. No pets. Cell 5374428. 
(136-145) . 

SUNSET 
APARTMENTS 

1024 Sunset 

1978-79 School year 

one bedroom furnished 

year lease from $150.00 

2 blocks from campus 

539-5051 o-ap.m.) 

WE NEED two lo share comfortable 5 bedroom 
house with three others. Separated living 
•llusfion or not. 1355 monthly. 776-3757. (1*3- 
146) 

EFFICIENCY APARTMENT, available August 1, 
close to campus, S12S/month Call attar 7 00 
p.m. 537-0891. (143-146) 



SUMMER RENTALS 

ROYAL TOWERS 
APTS. 

Two Bedrooms 
(135.00 a month 

Air Conditioning 

All Utilities Paid 

including Cable TV 

Contract June 1 —July 31 

$150.00 Deposit 

Call 539-8851 or 539-9510 

5:00 p.m.— 7:00 p.m. 



CALL 779-5353 Apartment for one or two. Air 
conditioned. Rent negotiable Good deal. (143- 
145) 

2216 BLAKER S I reet— Available June 1 Two 
bedroom home. I23Qrmonth, plus utilities. 
Will accommodate two or three students 
nicely. Call for appointment 537-2002. (143 
145) 

" PARKVIEW 
Student Housing 

Osage and nth St. 

Near Campus 
Near Aggieville 

• furnished 

• free parking 

• equipped kitchen 

• laundromat 

• $55 and up 

Reserve now for 

summer and fall 

Phone 5374233 

1015 a LUEMONT— available June 1. Five 
bedroom home. WIN accommodate live men 
or five women Cell 537-2002 for appointment. 
(143-145) 

NOW LEASING luxury studio apartments One 
block ess! of campus Available June 1 and 
August 1, Mont Blue Apartment* 539-4447, 
(144-149) 



PEANUTS 



by Charles Shultz 




NOUJ MANV OF VOU 
CJTVMPSARENOT 
ACQUAINTED liWTH NATURE'S 
NOBLE CREATURES... 




THEREFORE, A3 A SPECIAL 
TREAT, I HAVE 3R0U6HT 
FOR W0U TOPAW A 
REAL LIVE ANIMAL.' 





DOWNSTOWN 



by Tim Downs 



HEUO.*mLSLSfl\ 
PICarRE-OFKim \ 

THOK, Pi POP*. \ 

TtoON6CAm0ODWN 

VILLAGER. J 






"/usTmc^rmuE 

/ ASKED tOUTO 
/ SENOmONEYTO 
/ HELP FEED KKYl 
/ THoK.TD HELP Him 

SEE AM0THER 
I SUNRJSE. 



RAINTREE APT, 

2 bdrm furnished 

carpeted & draped 

close to campus 

dishwasher, no pets 

or children 

$300 per month 

Summer or Fall leases 

Call 537-4567 or 

539-1201 



NEW THREE bedroom apartment* Un- 
furnished, $30t»nonlh plus utilities. Air con- 
ditioning, carpel. 539-1962. (1 44-149) 

FOUR BEDROOM house, two story, one Mock 
from campus. For six person*, 175 per person. 
Available June 1st. 5374548. (144-149) 

ATTRACTIVE HOME In excellent neighborhood. 
Four bedrooms, fsmily room, air conditioning, 
carpeting, fenced yard, carport. (325. 
Available May 15 for family or mature studen- 
ts 539A202. (144-148) 



NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 
from $165 

• FREE shuttle service 

to KSU 

• portion of utilities paid 

* adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

Phone 

539-2951 

or see at 

1413 Cambridge Place 



COUPLE, FIRST floor of house. Two bedroom, 
close lo campus, garden space, oarage. Un- 
furnished Call 537-7681 after 5.00 p.m. (144 
146) 

PRIVATE ROOMS, efficiency apartment* 
available now and June first Close lo cam- 
pus. 537-2344 or evenings 775-5638 1 144 1481 



GOLD KEY 
APARTMENTS 



New deluxe 2 Bedroom— Modern 
Furniture— Garbage Disposal- 
Dishwasher— Shag Carpeted with 
Drapes. Close to City Park, Tennis 
Courts, Campus and Aggieville (3 
blocks). 

$245— $275-$300 
for students 

1417—14X9 Leavenworth 

Leasing for Fall and one im- 
mediately. 



SUMMER: CLOSE lo campus, Aggieville 
Balcony, carpeted, central sir, furnished, one 
snd one-hall bedroom apartment 
Reasonable. Cell 5374725. (144-146) 

TWO BEDROOM, partially furnished apartment, 
I wo blocks I rom campus *225 monthly. Lease 
snd deposit. 539-3872, (1*5-149) 



Low as $120 a Month 

Wildcat Inn Apts. 

For 

June and July 

Summer School 

Furnished- 
Air Conditioning 

WE HAVE 
LIMITED AVAILABILITY 

For More Information 
Call 

CELESTE 
539-5001 



JUNE-JULY: IVt bedroom, furnished apartment, 
air conditioned, disposal, shag carpet, three 
blocks from campus Very reasonable. Call 
537-0505 (145-1 49) 

SUMMERIFALL— two bedroom, furnished, 
newly remodeled basement apart menl with 
private entrance. Nice oulet street, close to 
campus, park and Aggieville 1195 plu* elec 
triclty, 7764180. (145-1491 



1t 



KANSAS STATE COtlEOtAM, Fri^ April 2t, tWl 



Mountaineering # 4. 




Mountaineering 1 is a skill 
of timing as well as tech 
nique. The wrong 
moment, like the 
wrong method, 
marks the gap 
between 
amateur and 
aficionado. So the 
key to successful mountaineer- 
ing is to choose the occasions 
wisely and well. When, then, is 
it appropriate to slowly quaff 
the smooth, refreshing 
mountains of Busch Beer? 
Celehrations, of course, 
are both expected and ex- 
cellent opportunities to 
test your mountaineering 
mettle. Indeed, on major 
holidays it is virtually 

mandatory 
to do so. 
Imagine 
Lushering 
in the 
fiscal new 
year or 
com- 
memo- 
rating 
Calvin C. 
Coolidge's 
birthday 
1 or throw- 
ing caution to the wind during 
Take-A-Sorghum-To-Lunch 

Week without the 
benefit of Busch. A 
disturbing pros- 
pect at best. 
On the 
other hand, not 
every event need, 
be as signifi- 
cant as those 
outlined above 




Small 

victories like exams passed, 
papers completed or classes 
attended are equally 
acceptable. 
Remember the 
mountain- 
eer's motto 
matricula- 
tion is 
celebration. ■ 
Interper- 
sonal relation 
ships are also 
meaning 



pleasures of mountaineering 
run the risk of being labeled 
social climbers. But such 
cheap shots are to be ignored 
They are the work of cynics, 
nay-sayers and chronic 
malcontents. 

Similarly, the ambience 
of an athletic afternoon (e.g. 
The Big Game) is another 
ideal moment. Downing 
the mountains elevates 
the morale of the fan and, 
hence, the team. There- 
fore, if you care at all about 
the outcome, it is your duty to 
mountaineer 

When should one not 
enjoy the invigoration of the 
mountains? Here, you'll be 
happy to learn, the list is 
much briefer 

Mountaineering is 
considered 

declasse 
with 
dessert, 
improper 
during judi- 
cial proceed- 
ings and just 
plain foolish while 
crop dusting around 
power lines. Otherwise, 
as the hot-heads of the 
sixties used to say, "Seize 
the time!" 



cU»tW w ^M ful times. There are 
,OUNTA\^£I!^r few things finer than 

taking your compan- 
ion in ha Jid and head 
ing for the mountains^ 
transcending the ho- 
hum and hum-drum 
in favor of a romantic 
'R & R Naturally, 
couples who share the 





<> 



i Mountaineering is the science and art of drinking Busch. The term originates due ^^P^-^^f^^^ 6 
by the label outside and perpetuates due to the cold, naturally refreshing taste inside. ( cf. lessons 1, 2 and 3. ) 




Don't just reach for a beer. 



BUSCH 



Head for the mountains. 



Anhruw Busch lm Si Louis Mr. 






KANSAS' STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
TOPFKA, K3 66612 EXCI1 



K 



ansas 



State 



Collegian 



Monday 

May 1, 1978 

Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 84 No. 146 



Housing looks at ways to cut deficit 



Small halls face possible cutbacks 



By LISA SANDMEYER 

Maff Writer 

and 

DIANE JOHNSON 

Collegian Reporter 

Boyd, Putnam and Van Zile 
residence halls are facing the 
posssibility of a cutback in ser- 
vices which would enable the 
Department of Housing to reduce 
the small halls' operating losses 
which last year totaled $137,000. 

The cutbacks being considered 
include incorporating switchboard 
service to the halls into one main 
switchboard, cutting the number 
of staff in the halls and closing the 
food services in the halls after next 
year. 

Food services, if cut, would be 
provided by other halls. 



"We never considered cutting 
services, only expenditures," said 
Thomas Frith, director of housing. 
"We must provide the same 
services to the small halls as to 
other halls." 

Housing has been covering the 
losses of the small halls with ex- 
cess revenue from other halls. 
Jardine Terrace, for example, 
brought in $75,966.73 more than it 
cost to operate the facility. 

FRITH SAID the small (18118' 
food services will be open next 
year but he couldn't guarantee 
they would stay open after that. 
Many people believe the 
elimination of the services will 
hurt the integrity and personality 
of the halls. 

"Cutting comers like this will 



Inside 



GOOD MORNING1 Mostly cloudy today with the possibility of 

showers. Highs in the mid 50s. Details, page 3... 

SINKING LIKE A ROCK was not the aim of concrete canoe 
paddlers Saturday, page 7 with photo, page 12... 

AGGIEVILLE EXPANSION Is discussed by the City Planning 
Board during Iti meeting, page 5... 



hurt our residence hall system," 
said Jerri Sparke, former 
treasurer for the Association of 
Residence Halls and Ford Hall 
staff member. "K-State has one of 
the top systems in the country 
because people keep coming back 
to the halls. If they do this (cut out 
services), no one will want to live 
in the small halls." 

"Taking away the food service 
and switchboards will make the 
small halls just places for people 
to sleep," said one student, who 
asked not to be identified. 

Susan Bell, president of Boyd 
Hall, said closing the food service 
there "would make a lot of people 
unhappy" and that the appeal of 
the hall would go down. Losing a 
full-time director wouldn't have 
much effect, though, she said. 

"We hope we can come up with 
enough alternatives to keep from 
losing our food service," Bell said, 
and if the decision is made to close 
small hall cafeterias, "We'll put 
up a good fight." 

Frith explained that food ser- 
vices in the small halls costs more 
per person to operate than in the 
large hall complexes because the 
per worker output is not as great. 



THIS ISN'T the first time 
housing has considered cutting 
food services in the small halls. In 
1975, the idea was brought up and a 
decision on the matter was stayed, 
partly due to a massive letter- 
writing campaign by small ball 
residents and their parents. 

Pat Magerkurth, director of 
Boyd Hall and complex coor- 
dinator for the small halls, said 
she hopes the food services won't 
be closed. 

"Hopefully, enough other things 
can be done to cope with the 
deficit— it (the food service) is a 
bad thing to lose," Magerkurth 
said. 

Magerkurth also said the small 
halls will have administrators 
next year but said she doesn't 
know if these administrators will 
be called directors. 

"Taking away the directors 
could have bad effects on halls if 
they aren't replaced with 
someone. Administrators who act 
as leaders can be a positive in- 
fluence on halls," Magerkurth 
said. 

Money paid by residents is 
housing's only revenue; that is, 
there are no government or 



University subsidies of ex- 
penditures or programing. 

"We get nothing from the 
University but instruction," Frith 
said and part of those instructions 
were to come up with a proposal to 
make Edwards Hall a break-even 
venture without athletes living 
there. 

IN FRITH* S proposal to 
President Duane Acker, Edward's 
food service was cut. The Athletic 
Department picks up the extra 
costs of the athlete's training 
table, as it will next year when it is 
set up in Derby Food Center. 

"There needs to be a very 
exacting cost analysis made," 
said Chester Peters, vice 
president for student affairs and 
member of the Housing Council 
and housing operational group. 

"We must look at potential 
changes, the benefits of those 
changes and the costs of those 
changes. No decision can be made 
until those things have been 
brought up," Peters said. 

Housing is also looking over its 
20-year-old accounting system at 
this time. 




Rogues paddle to victory 



The K.U. Rogues won, floating in a full 17 minutes 
before the K-State Kaw Dads, Channel Cats and Blue 
Wingers. The Rogues No. 3 took fifth. 

Twenty canoes were shoved off from the east bank 
of the Kansas River near Manhattan Saturday 
morning. Only five straggled to the finish line in 
Lawrence Sunday. 

As required, each canoe carried three racers; two 
male and one female. 



The first leg of the race was marked by in- 
termittent rain. Cloudy skies prevailed during the 
last legs. The weather didn't make things any easier 
for the participants. 

But the racers didn't mind. Competition is the 
name of the game, the etpirit d' corps. 

The Rogues' winning time was 15 hours and 55 
minutes, hardly a quick victory. 



Photos by Cr»lg Chandler 



TOP: While many were to retire from the race, the beginning of the 
competition found the rowers determined to cross the winners' line. 
ABOVE: Joe Willard, graduate student In health, physical 
education and reccreation, assists Ellen Smith, graduate student in 
HPER, from the water after she finished rowing one of the many 
legs for the Channel Cat canoe team. RIGHT: In order to save 
precious time, a member of the K State Kaw Dads team lumped 
overboard during a crew change. 




2_ KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon., May 1.1971 

Alumni to 'dial for dollars' 
in Endowment's Telefund 



Alumni of K-State in the 
Manhattan area will have a 
chance of becoming a greater part 
of the K -State family this week. 

This week, K-State students and 
alumni will join together to help 
raise money for K-State through 
the Telefund. 

The Telefund, developed by the 
Endowment Association, has been 
an annual fund raising event for 
six years, said Tom Parmer, 
Coordinator of Annual Giving of 
the Endowment Association of K- 
State. 

Chairmen are selected for each 



day of the Telefund by Farmer and 
Amy Button, coordinator of 
Student-Alumni Relations. 
Approximately 20 people have 
been recruited to assist in calling 
alumni in the Manhattan area. 

Traditionally, all the Telefund 
workers have been K-State 
alumni, Farmer said. 

This year, however, two 
students will assist in the fund 
raising efforts: Stan Watt, senior 
in agricultural economics and 
Judy Weltsch, junior in marketing 
and journalism. 

"We thought it would be good for 



Walker wins pageant; 
will compete in Pratt 



Robin Walker, graduate student 
in business administration, was 
crowned the 1978 Miss Manhattan- 
K-State Saturday night, winning a 
$500 scholarship and entrance to 
the Miss Kansas pageant this July 
in Pratt. 

Walker is a cheerleader at K- 
State and for the talent com- 
petition, she did an original dance 
routine. She was also first runner- 
up in the 1976 Miss Kansas-USA 
pageant. 

"I didn't expect to win at all," 
she said. "I wanted to enter the 
pageant, originally because I'm 
just trying to do as many things as 
I can while I'm in college. 

"It really did shock me. When 
they announced it, me knees 
buckled and someone had to catch 
me," Walker said. 

The first runner-up, and winner 
of a $300 scholarship was Janon 
Cupit, freshman in accounting. 
The second runner-up and winner 

Tuttle may be site 
of electric plant 

The Kansas Electric Power 
Cooperative (KEPC) was ten- 
tatively chosen last week for an 
$80,000 grant to study the 
feasibility of a hydroelectric 
power plant for Tuttle Creek 
reservoir, located six miles north 
of Manhattan. 

The Department of Energy 
granted preliminary approval to 
the KEPC to conduct the study. 

Joe Mulholland, KEPC director, 
said the approval indicates a need 
for additional power in rural 
areas. 

The Tuttle Creek plant could 
produce 9,000 kilowatts of elec- 
tricity if built, Mulholland said. 

Tuttle Creek is one of 57 projects 
chosen nationwide by the energy 
department for studies. 

A spokesman for the energy 
department said the program was 
started to revive one of the 
nation's neglected energy 
resources— hydroelectric power 
generated from small rivers and 
streams. 



HEWLETT 



fk 



PACKARD 



Calculators 



Sale 
Price 



HP-21 

HP-22 
HP-25A 
HP-27 
HP-97 



$59.95 
$89.95 

$89.95 
$129.95 
$845.00 



Reg. 
Price 

$80.00 
$125.00 
$125.00 
$175.00 
$750.00 



special offer 
good while supply lasts 




of a $150 scholarship was Kandy 
Berry, freshman in radio-TV. 
The third runner-up and winner of 
a $100 scholarhip was Kathy 
Heimerman, freshman in interior 
architecture. The fourth runner-up 
and winner of a $50 scholarship 
was Shirley Bruey, sophomore in 
recreation. 

Miss Congeniality was awarded 
to Mary Ann Giliiland, sophomore 
in office administration. 



alumni to hear students sup- 
porting the school with a purpose 
in mind (to raise money)," Far- 
mer said. 

"We also thought it would be 
good for students to see what it's 
like to be an alum— the 
Endowment Association's side," 
he said. 

"We use the Telefund to thank 
past supporters," Fanner said. 

THE TELEFUND is a good way 

to personalize a thank you and to 
encourage alumni to contribute 
again, he said. 

"If they haven't been a sup- 
porter, we like to encuorage them. 
Their gifts are needed," Farmer 
said. 

Farmer said the goal is to call 
every alumni in the Manhattan 
area. 

According to Farmer, the 
purpose of the Telefund is to get 
alumni involved and let them 
know their support is needed. 

"The dollar amount isn't as 
important as getting people in- 
volved," Farmer said. 

Money raised will go to areas in 
K-State where financial support is 
needed, he said. 

Monetary gifts have been used 
in many areas of program enrich- 
ment for the University, 



ATTENTION: 

If you, in the past 4 years, have been associated with, 
acquainted with or have the general misfortune of 
knowing any or all of the following: 



Eric Atkinson 
Dan Delimont 
Kent Ferguson 
Bob Hajovsky 
Don Hanna 
Kent Kelly 



Bob Lehman 
John McDonald 
Mike McMulkin 
Stan Newby 
Ron Vering 
Ron Wilderman 



Please contact 776-3001, 776-0964, or 537-2389 
for information about May Sth and . . . 

THE PARTY 



Attention Engineering Students 

Election* for Council Officers 
and Sophomore Representative 

Wednesday, May 3, 9 a.m.4 p.m. 

Vote in Cardwell and Seaton front lobbies. 
Bring your Fee Card. 



PRIDETTE 
DRILL TEAM 

TRYOUTS 

for 1978—1979 

May2-4th Fieldhouse 

4:00-6:00 p.m. 

May Sth FINALS Fieldhouse 

4:30-6:30 p.m. 

For more information call 537-8667 



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EAST STREET 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Moo., Mary 1, 1t7» 



Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

Carter remarks unclear 

CAIRO, Egypt— The newspaper Al Ahram 
published an interview Sunday quoting President 
Carter as saying a Mideast peace settlement is 
possible without an independent Palestine state 
and without complete Israeli withdrawal from 
occupied Arab lands. 

Egyptian Foreign Minister Ibrahim Kamel 
summoned American Ambassador Hermann Eilts 
to explain Carter's statements. 

The semi-official Cairo paper referred to Car- 
ter's remarks as "Strange statements ... con- 
tradicting all his previous statements." 

Previously, Carter has said he favors a 
"homeland" for the Palestinians and has lent 
support to the Palestinians determining their own 
future. 

Rhodesian group wants Hove 

SALISBURY, Rhodesia— A powerful faction in 
Rhodesia's biracial administration Sunday 
demanded the reinstatement of black cabinet 
minister Byron Hove, but wavered on whether to 
quit the interim government in a dispute over his 
firing. 

The statement came after a four-hour meeting 
between party leaders and their head— Bishop 
Abel Muzorewa, an influential moderate and one 
of three blacks on Rhodesia's ruling executive 
council. 

Hove, dismissed as co-minister of justice Friday 
for criticizing the racial makeup of Rhodesia's 
police and judiciary, told reporters in London that 
the two-month-old government would be in danger 
without Muzorewa. He is thought to have the 
widest support of any council member among 
Rhodesia's blacks. 

U.S. trades spy for student 

LEWISBURG, Pa.^Saying he would do it all 
again, convicted spy Robert Thompson left the 
Lewisburg Federal Penitentiary on Sunday on his 
way to asylum in Communist East Germany in a 
complicated swap involving four governments. 

Thompson, 43, who said he was born in Leipzig, 
in what is now East Germany, was an Air Force 
clerk convicted of passing secrets to the Soviets in 
1965. He had been in Lewisburg, a forboding red 
brick prison that once held union boss Jimmy 
Hoffa, for more than 13 years of his 30-year sen- 
tence. 

He said he was headed straight for a flight out of 
the United States to Germany with East German 
attorney Wolfgang Vogel, instrumental in 
arranging a prisoner exchange involving Thomp- 
son, a young American student jailed by East 
Germany, and an Israeli pilot released a week 
earlier by Mozambique in Africa. 

Still left to be freed is Alan Van Norman, 43, of 
Winden, Minn., waiting in an East Berlin prison. 
Van Norman was sentenced to a two and a half- 
year term by the East Germans for trying to 
smuggle a doctor, his wife and his son to the West. 
He has been in jail since February 1977. 

Nuclear protest ends 

GOLDEN, Colo.— A weekend rally that drew 
some 5,000 protesters to the Rocky Flats nuclear 
weapons plant drew to a close with an overnight 
vigil on a little-used railroad track leading to the 
plant. 

For many who stood for four hours in the wmd 
and the rain to decry the use of nuclear power, the 
weekend held memories of other demonstrations, 
rallies and marches. But for those who were 
around for the turmoil of the 1960s, it was a picnic 
in comparison. 

Saturday's demonstration was the largest ever 
held at the plant, the nation's only producer of the 
Dlutonium components for nuclear bombs. 



Local Forecast 

Mostly cloudy today with high in the upper 50s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. 



Campus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

COORDINATED UNDI RORADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS application* are 
Ming taKen In Justin 107 through May II. 

ASK CAMPUS AND BOARD OIRECTOR 
applied l on* *re available In tlM SCS off le and 
«rt dua May 3. 

PRIDETTE DRILL TEAM tryouts art In 
AhMm Fltldhoust M.y7. throuflh May S from 
4 p.m. to * p.m. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for (all 
Iff! art available In the Penhellenlc office, 
Holrt HOB. Deadline for registration It July 
IS. 

AG MICH SENIORS composite picture! 
will be taken at the photo service, Calvin 
basement, at 3:30 p.m. May 3 and 3. 

TODAY 

DAUGHTERS OP DIANA will meat In 10* 
Ford at f p.m. 

ALPHA PHI OMEGA will meet In Union 113 
at 7 p.m. for officer Installation. 

MICRO CLUB will matt In Leasgre JOT at 7 
p.m. tor elections Or. Urban will speak 

ALPHA TAU ALPHA will matt In Union 3V 
•t S:30 p.m. 

War on Words to 
attack 'ya know' 

GREELEY, Colo. CAP)— the 
War on Words Committee is 
preparing for literary battle. 

The group at the University of 
Northern Colorado says it is taking 
on the phrase "ya know" as its 
first assault on sloppy language. 

Upcoming in the campaign, 
journalism professor Wayne 
Melanson says, will be such 
overworked words and phrases as 
"really," "I hear you" and a "non- 
word"—' "in-ega rdless. " 



TAU BETA PI will meat In Seeton llf at 
s:30 p.m. 

BUSINESS COUNCIL will maaf in the 
Union Board room at e p.m. 

LITTLE SISTERS OP THE STAR AND 
LAMP wilt meet at the PI Kappa Phi house at 

» 30 p.m. Attendance Is mandatory 

IHTRAFRATf RHITY COUNIL Will meet 
In the Union Council Chambers at 7 p.m. 

HOMS EC EDUCATION INTEREST 
GROUP will meat In Justin Lobby at 6 p.m. 
for picnic. 

DAIRY SCIENCE CLUB Will meet In Call 
no at 7 p.m. 

RECEPTION FOR PUTNAM AND MC- 
CAIN SCHOLARS will be In the Union Flint 
Hilt room at 3 p.m. 

A A O GRADUATE CLUB Will meat at the 
Union Biuemont Buffet at noon. 

DIETETIC STUDENTS: ho s ts M ISS for 

Grace Sttumtrr lecture must turn In money 
for luncheon today In Justin 104. Mast In Flint 
Hills, room at 11 :30 a.m. Wednesday. 

HOME ECONOMICS STUDENTS Will meat 
with candidate tor position of assistant dean 
In Justin 14* at 4:30 p.m. 

PHI EPS1LOM KAPPA Will meet at the 
Netatorlvm Annex at 7 p.m. 



TUESDAY 
BLACK STUDENT UNION Will matt In 
union 313 at I p.m. to welcome new offlear*. 



BLOCK A ORIOLE will meet In Weber 107 
at 7:30 p.m. 

AMERICAN STUDENTS POR IK 
TCRNATIONAL AWARENESS Will meat at 
the international Student Centel at 7 p.m. for 
elections. 

COMMITTEE ON WOMEN'S HEALTH Will 

meat at the Women's Center, All Poynffc at 
7:30 p.m. 

PRE PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB Will 
meet In Aekert 11* at S p.m. 

CANOEING in KANSAS will meet at ma 
UFM nous* at 7:30 p.m. far distribution of 
summer trip schedule. 

SISTSR) OF THK GOLD ROSE will meet 
at the Beta Sis house at * :30 p.m. 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CLUB and 

Interested persons meat In front ot the Union 
at S:1S p.m. for ride* to valanttno'S for 

elections and supper. 

K STATE FLYING CLUB Will meat In 
Weber 230 at 7 p.m. for election*. 

ARTS AND SCIENCE HONORS 
program: Sanlor Honor* Convocation will 
be In Union 111 at 7 p.m. 

CACIA GIRLS will meat at the Acacia 
house at a: JO p.m. 

POULTRY SCIENCE CLUB will matt In 
Call 301 at 7:30 p.m. 

STUDENT DIETETIC ASSOCIATION will 
matt in Justin 110 at *:X p.m. for officer 



COMM. SPEC. LTD. 

Blue Hills Shopping Center 

776-7292 

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PHOTOGRAPHERS 
NEEDED: 

...We're building up our Staff 



Each spring for three years American Composite Corporation has 
advertised for and hired college age people to be on our staff with 
ads like this. Now, its that time again. 

Our first year in business required 5 photographers and over the 
years we've expanded to where we now need at least 20. 

If you'd like a position inside a dynamic, fast growing company, or 
would simply like to take a year out of school to learn, make money 
and do some travelling, then you'd better contact us now. 

We're looking for intellegent, well groomed individuals who will 
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We offer extensive paid training, salary plus expenses and of cour- 
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Write today for an application to: 



Mr. Dennis Moore 

Assistant Director of Photography 

American Composite Corporation 

P.O. Box 19672 

Kansas City, Missouri 64141 




Opinions 



Artit Ift Jppr* 



nna en thi* pi*t da no* neceitanly 'Oftim* the •«'"• Colleran 
ti*n or inc Board oi Studtnt Publication* 



Mail order 
marauders 



If you want to get rich quick, a good bet would be to 
go into the mail order business. 

All you need is a post office box, a fast voice, a few 
dollars and a plane ticket to Europe to use after 
revenue is accumulated and bankruptcy is declared. 

Fraudulent advertising is a growing problem and 
should be of large concern to college students. 
Moreover, children are taken in yearly by the 
promising ads found in the backs of comic books. 

AT THE least, K-State has had 20 cases in which 
students have fallen prey to mail order ads, according 
to Deb Haifleigh, director of the Consumer Relations 
Board. 

Billing disputes with record companies have posed 
problems, but the major problem for K-State students 
has been magazine orders. 

You've seen the ads. They promise some sort of 
package deal, and follow up a response with phone 
calls. 

Haifleigh said last semester, a magazine mail order 
company called Metro Press called students offering 
them a subscription package of four or five magazines 
for the price of one. Many students were deceived; the 
magazines never came. And no refunds. 

Metro Press*went bankrupt and, after that step, the 
consumer is at a loss. 

THE COMPLAINTS concerning mail order ad 
products is that the consumer never receives the 
merchandise or, if he does, it is of poor quality in- 
congruous to the expectations of the ad. 

Worse yet are the comic book ads to which many 
young buyers succumb. 

Advertisers spend about $66 million a year to plug 
their wares in comics, and 82 to 92 percent of all 
children from age 7 to ll read comic books, Federal 
Trade Commission member William Erxleben told the 
Associated Press. 

Some of the products advertised include dehydrated 
sea monkeys which spring back to life when the buyer 
adds water, a weight-building kit, "just 99 cents for 200 
stamps to start your very own collection/' and the 
great machine that turns plain paper into dollar bills. 

THE FTC needs to monitor such "businesses" and 
scrutinize them more closely. And consumers who 
have been had must help the fight by not being em- 
barrassed to complain. 

Legitimate businesses as well should be highly 
concerned with the effects such frauds have on the 
public opinion of the American free enterprise system. 

VELINA HOUSTON 
Editorial Editor 



Kansas State Collegian 

Monday, May 1,1978 

THE COLLEGIAN It publlltwd by Student Publication*. Inc., Kmu« State Univerttty. 
daily except Saturday*, Sunday*, holiday* and vacation period* 

OF F I OES ar» In the north wing of K edile Mall, phone 533 tSSS 

SECOND CLASS petteao paid al Manhattan . KMMltiMI. Publication Mo. If I M*. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATI! 

SIS, on* calendar year; SMB. one aametter. 

THE collegian function* In a legally autonomou* relational lp with tht Univenlty 
and It writttn and edited by ttudenfi *ervl ng tht UWverHty community. 

Chrl* William*. Editor 
Mart T India. Advert I n no Manager 

0,nnlv6oon..K„Co... * W g lS 5g5 

MM Ander*on, B*C*y ••rtWtt • b-KTSiVJS? 

velmeMou.lon *<* »<"*• ' §« £ 

Kr£2r •:::::::;::::::::;:;::::::::::^.^SZ 

^1 ?!-^ Feature* Editor 

~£* JJJJJ, , AMI. Ftatufoi Editor 

/anaMi e gln»,U*«Mn* n ayar,f£rt*Ttl»j» ■ C atyVdlto? 

DaveMught* .'.".'.'.'.'.'.".' "."".' .'.' SO* Editor 

Jfr^J^Stan. .. Art. and Entertainment editor 

Amvof FfrfcHen* * 

Paul Rhode*. Tim Hot an, Nancy Hor*t, J awn Schatf, yu,it*r* 

BHtNadon, Dale Keinnm. Mary Wood start wr.rer* 





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BillNadon 



River run and beer cans 



The weather service predicted a 
50 percent chance of rain for the 
last Saturday of April. Instead of 
this moisture falling in obvious 
drops, it hung in the air, clinging to 
the flannel shirts and canoe 
paddles of the participants in the 
Midwest's version of Deliverance. 

At 8:15 a.m. Central Standard 
Time, over 200 competitors vied 
for the honor of being the first 
team to navigate a shallow 
waterway that leads to a city with 
the unlikely name of Lawrence. 
They call this the Kaw River 
Rivalry. It should be renamed the 
Kaw River Kill. 

There was plenty of energy and 
enthusiasm as teams of canoeists 
battled the sleepy currents and 
sandbars. This competition took 
its toll in more ways than one. 

IT WAS obvious some of the 
more experienced teams took this 
race seriously. Fifty feet from 
shore, a team of three in knee-deep 
sand practiced split second timing 
in hopes at placing a fresh crew 
aboard a fiberglass craft. Time 
was important. 

Where these teams were 
examples of strict regimentation, 
other competitors could be 
classified as anti-organizational. 



What these teams lacked in 
precision they made up for by the 
ability to consume alcohol hours 
before the liquor stores opened. 

Primed for paddling, these 
intoxicated teams defiled the very 
river which made this race 
possible. Unfortunately, the 
landowners and Mother Nature 
lost out in this interstate rivalry. 

IGNORANT slobs tossed beer 
cans indiscriminately; over- 
zealous racers destroyed small 
trees and bushes as they swarmed 
the banks of the Kaw; and 
inebriated drivers took short-cuts 
across newly planted fields. Both 
KU students and K -Staters are to 
blame. 

In these days of shrinking 
resources, it is sad that supposedly 
college-educated persons can be so 
ecologically ignorant. 

This is not to say that all of the 
200-plus people are to blame. But 
anyone who stepped over a beer 
can or ignored a donut container 
lying on the ground is as guilty as 
the original polluter. 

The Kansas State Association of 
Residence Halls is responsible for 
this event which is anticipated by 
many water enthusiasts. In the 
past, they have done a good job of 



coordinating it and making it the 
highlight of the arrival of spring, 

not to mention the only 90-mile 
party in the state 

IN ORDER TO continue this 
show of superiority over K-Who, it 
is imperative that adequate 
supervision be provided at the 
remote checkpoints where the 
pollution problem is the greatest. 

Trash cans should be placed at 
these areas and penalities should 
be placed on the teams whose 
members leave more than their 
footprints. 

This race is not cheap to finance, 
Many establishments have 
donated money and potables to 
insure the success of the rivalry. 
Since the entry fee is minimal (it 
works out to less than a dollar per 
person) an increase would go to 
the cleaning up and maintaining of 
the riverbank so future canoeists 
can experience the Kaw at its best. 

THE KAW River Rivalry is one 
of the best experiences for 
students to participate in. Too bad 
a few have to spoil it. Isn't it ironic 
that the same people I saw toss 
beer cans cambe seen using the 
cowpaths on campus? 



Letters to the editor 



Athletes are people 



Editor, 



We are a little tired of the at- 
titude of most K -Staters towards 
the athletes. 

These guys have come many 
miles to be a part of K-State 
athletics— only to get here and be 
labeled as animals and dumb 
jocks. 

To be the individuals that they 
are takes much responsibility to 
be able to attend school, practice 



the hours they do, and try to be 
their own person by participating 
in outside activities as well as still 
finding time to spend with their 
friends'. 

There are many people on this 
campus who don't see the athletes 
as they are. These people have 
never taken the time to associate 
with the athletes and to find they 
share many of the same thoughts, 
feelings and concerns . 

In the past year, the athletic 



department and especially the 
football program has encountered 
many problems. But we now have 
a new coaching staff, a new 
respect between the team and the 
coach, and we feel it's about time 
for a new attitude on this campus. 

Cindy Roth 

Junior in horticulture industries 

Becky Leon 

Junior in social work and 

corrections 



Edwards clowns 



Editor, 

I'd like to thank the three or four 
clowns from Edwards Hall who 
found it necessary to ruin the 
Spring Fling bed race and parade. 

The way you had to show off 
your strength by physically at- 
tacking the other participants' 
beds before the race was 
disgusting. 

Not to mention that you were 
committing a federal offense by 



shooting a fire extinguisher. And 
then running around Aggievilie 
like a bunch of animals, punching 
people because they were trying to 
get you back for getting them wet. 
If this is the type of sport- 
smanship you athletes always 
display, please don't enter the 
race next year. . 

Mike Stevens 
Junior in business management 



The Collegian welcomes 
letters from readers. 

All letters must be signed 
and include the year in school, 
classification and the 
telephone number of the 
writer. 

Because of time and space 
considerations, the editors 
reserve the right to shorten or 
reject material at their 
discretion. 

Letters may be submitted 
(preferably typed) in either 
Kedzie 116 or 103. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon.,M«y 1,1178 



Move over, old Manhattan, 
your Aggie may graduate 



SEIKO 



By CINDY IZZO 

Collegian Reporter 

Several proposals by the 

Manhattan City Planning Board 
concerning Aggie ville expansion 
were presented by City Planner 
Gary Stith to the members of the 
Older Manhattan Neighborhoods 
Association (OMNA), during its 
monthly meeting Thursday, 

According to Stith, in 1971, the 
City Commission reconsidered the 
1968 Land Use Plan (LUP), which, 
in part, would allow expansion of 
Aggieville up to the east side of 
llth Street, and eventually down to 
Fremont and Laramie Streets. 

"There are an infinite number of 
varieties one could propose," 
(concerning the expansion)," Stith 
said. "One of the first areas of 
priorities as indicated to me by the 
planning board, is the area to the 
west of Anderson Avenue to 14th 
Street." 

Stith said these two arteries are 
major traffic carriers, and make a 
good boundary between a business 
and residential district. 

Some other areas being con- 
sidered by the planning board are 
the area south to City Park, and an 
area east of llth Street . 

"I believe if Aggieville was 
expanded all the way to City Park, 
there would be a conflict between 
the two (the park and 
Aggieville)," Stith said. 

HE SAID the planning board 
considered the existing LUP ex- 
pansion adequate, with the east 
side of llth Street being modified 
to a C-l (central business) district 
to include no restaurants. 

"This area," Stith said, "would 
provide the proper buffer for R-3 
(multi-unit residential) districts." 
The west side of llth would still 

Educators reach 



1 1 00 : 



items 

■ r 

'non-negotiable' 

PRATT (AP)— A district court 
judge has declared an impasse in 
contract negotiations between the 
South Central Kansas Special 
Education Cooperative and a 
teachers association. 

The impasse declaration was 
requested by the South Central 
Kansas Special Education 
Teachers Association of the 
National Education Association. 

Judge Charles Stewart made the 
declaration at a hearing Friday, 
after both organizations agreed an 
impasse existed in part of the 
negotiations, which began in 
January. Stewart scheduled a May 
15 hearing to discuss a second part 
of negotiations dealing with what 
the cooperative board has called 
"non-negotiable" items. 



remain a C-3 (commercial 
business zone). 

Stith also discussed the 
possibility of a request before the 
planning board to make the 
southeast corner of llth and 
Bluemont the site of an Inter- 
national House of Pancakes. 

Stith said the area occupied by 
the House of Pancakes would take 
in the first three houses on that 
block. 

"The planning board is con- 
cerned whether or not expansion is 
possible in this area," Stith said. 
"I am concerned about the traffic 
flow on llth Street." * 

The renovation of the pool 
located in City Park was discussed 
by Bruce McCallum, city 
engineer. 

McCallum said consultants have 
been hired, and will file a report to 
the city on whether it will be 
feasible to renovate the existing 
pool, or construct a new one. 

"The present pool in the park 
was constructed in 1938, and un- 
fortunately, nothing has been done 
to the pool since then," McCallum 
said. "For example, the deck area 
around the pool isn't adequate in 
size. Also, among other things, the 
electrical system should be 
replaced." 

MCCALLUM SAID that in 1970, 
when the first recommendations 
were presented to upgrade the 
pool, the cost was somewhere in 
the area of 1270,000. 

"Today the estimate is running 
somewhere around $350,000," 
McCallum said. "The City 
Commission has some revenue 
money set aside totaling $135,00. 

"We would like to rebudget the 
amount for next year, and receive 
matching funds from the Bureau 
of Outdoor Recreation ( BOR) , and 
the school district (383) , which has 
shown an interest in the pool," he 
said. 

"The junior and senior highs are 
remodeling, and they (school 
officials) told me if any money 



was left over, they would try to 
help out with the costs." 

Both schools would use the pool 
as teaching and recreation 
facilities, McCallum said. 

The main problem with funding 
from the BOR, is the stipulation 
that they (the BOR), will fund the 
costs of the pool if it is both an 
indoor-outdoor facility, McCallum 
said. 

"We must build the pool where 
we can keep 80 percent of the pool 
open without any enclosure, or the 
BOR won't fund us," McCallum 
said. 

He said he wants to have at least 
$600,000 to work with on the pool. 




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Lords 'n Ladys 




PINBALL 
CONTEST 

Prizes for the three 

best players. Contest 

ends May 15 

THE 
PARLOUR 

1123 Moro— Aggieville 



210 Humboldt 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon, May 1. 1978 




WHAT A MOUTHFUL OF FUN! 




And a small price to pay for so much fun! 
(Soft Tacos Not Included) 

^F ^T ^T ^r offer empires May 17. 197H 

V V V V« ' > 19 Moro st - 

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Photo by Gran) Sanborn 



SPIRITUAL SONG... Deborah Herviey, director of United Black Voices, not only 
directs, but preaches. The group performed Sunday, instilling Its audience with 
reverent respect. 

United Black Voices shows 
approach to God is 'ugly' 



ByCAMILLEGIVENS 
Collegian Reporter 

When envisioning what one 
should look like when going before 
God, the last thing people think of 
is looking ugly. 

And yet, according to Debra 
Herviey, director of the United 
Black Voices, ugly is the only way, 

"People get dressed up when 
they go to church. But that doesn't 

Collegian Review 

stop us from loving the Lord. We 
go to worship him. To worship, we 
sing, dance and clap. We lose our 
inhibitions. We get ugly. We don't 
care how we look," Herviey said. 

And for many who attended the 
performance Sunday afternoon 
sponsored by the Deltas and the 



Pyramids of Delta Sigma Theta, 
appearance was irrelevant. The 
atmosphere of the gospel per* 
forma nee was churchly. Herviey 
said the audience was there to 
hear the voices "grantd by the 
Lord." 

HERVIEY DIRECTED the 

choir with immense power. Every 
movement was one of strength and 
direction. 

Gospel music performed by the 
United Black Voices is not music 
for listening alone. Involvement 
by the audience becomes essen- 
tial, as many lose inhibitions and 
begin to clap hands and tap feet in 
time to the pulsating beat. 

The choir itself was not only 
involved spiritually but physically 
in the performance as the mem- 
bers swayed back and forth in 
time to the beat of the music. 



Solos by Ruby Kirkwood, Nita 
Cobbins, Janice Murry, Yolanda 
Rush, and a duet by Rlonda and 
Kevin Knight, were moving. 

The group members sang each 
song with feeling, their voices 
lifting the souls of many. Although 
the audience was small, the group 
didn't let this hold back its 
powerful interpretation of the 
gospel. When the harmonizing 
voices came together in unity, the 
audience responded, getting the 
feeling of unity and acknowledging 
the gifted performance. 

The jubilant voices of this group 
filled the Union Little Theater and 
engulfed the receptive audience. 

It is a shame more people 
weren't present to hear this 
beautifully gifted group. Those 
who attended, however, witnessed 
the unlimited talents these persons 



TrHE HEwlETT-PACkARd 25 



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The 
PROTEAN 

GLASS 
STUDIO 

Offering the 
Stained Glass Artist 

• Tools 

Glass Pliers 
Glass Cutters 
Leading Knives 
Soldering Irons 

• Metals 

Lead & Zinc Channeling 
Copper Foil 
Solder 

• Glass 

Domestic CaUierdrals 
General Opalescenls 
German Antique (early May) 

• Instruction 

Beginning & Self-Directed Workshops 
Stained Glass Literature 

Open to the public Tues, Wed, Thurs 5-7 p.m. 

1611 Pierre 

Watch for June re-opening in new location 

Ralph Flowers— Proprietor 

Supporter of the Manhattan Artist Pool 




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f 



1 




Francois Tnillaut compassionately relates the (rue story of Adele Hugo, the 
younger daughter of Victor Hugo, and her unrequited but unrelenting love for a 
Brillsb lieutenant. As Adele, beautiful Isabella Adjanl gives a brilliant per- 
formance, completely conveying the obsess I ven ess, the self preoccupation 
and the Inclination toward destruction of a woman whose attention Is fixed 
totally on one man. 

"It 'a Trulaufs most passionate work. It Is a musical, lilting film with a tidal pull 
to It. Adala la a rivaling, gnat character No one bafora Trufaut has aver treated 
a woman's crippling romantic fixation with such understanding, black humor 
and fullness. An intense, daring vision. " — PauHne Kael 



TUESDAY 

UTILE THEATRE 3:30 



100 



New Yorker 

FORUM HAL1 7:30 




INTERNATIONAL 
FILM SERIES 




1007 RD 



KANSAS STATE COLLEOIAN. Moo., May 1, 197» 



ith 



K-State sinks, KU stays afloat 
in Tuttle concrete canoe race 




The competition was heavy 
Saturday at the fifth annual K- 
State Invitation Concrete Canoe 
Race at Tuttle Creek. 

Students from the University of 
Kansas won the overall com- 
petition at the event while the K- 

See related photo, 
P. 12 

State team won the best con- 
struction award for its purple and 
white entries "Tuttle Express" 
and "The Force." 



Team points were awarded in 
the preliminaries, semi-finals and 
finals to determine final team 
scores. KU, with 24 points, won a 
traveling trophy and the 
University of Illinois was second 
with 21 points. 

Plaques were given to the 
winning crew members in each 
division and the K-State teams 
received a school trophy for the 
best construction title. 

Nine schools participated in the 
event co-sponsored by K-State 
student chapter of the American 



From Manhattan to Salina: 
Bergen still wearing crown 

Lori Bergen, sophomore in history and political science, was crowned 
Miss Salina-Sa line Valley Friday night, and will represent Saline county 
in the 1978 Miss Kansas Scholarship Pageant. 

Bergen won a $600 scholarhip, a $300 wardrobe and some gift cer- 
tificates. 

Bergen was Miss Manhattan-K-State in 1977, and was third runner-up 
in the Miss Kansas Scholarship Pageant. 

For the talent competition, Bergen played a violin solo as she did last 
year in the Manhattan pageant. 

"I haven't decided what I'm going to do yet in the Miss Kansas 
pageant. I know 1 will do a violin solo, but I don't know what song," she 
said. 

"The songs do show my talent, but I'm not sure they are real crowd 
pleasers. Saturday night at the Miss Manhattan-K-Sute pageant I 
played a hoe-down piece and the crowd just loved it, so I don't know what 
I'm going to do," Bergen said. 

Bergen said she feels much more confident about competing in the 
Miss Kansas Scholarship Pageant this year. 

"The competition will be tough, but I feel more confident this year, 
especially since I know what to expect," she said 

Bergen will compete in the Miss Kansas Scholarship Pageant the 
second week in July in Pratt. 

Nixon says knowledge 
of tapes doomed term 

NEW YORK (AP)-It comes as no surprise, but Richard Nixon thinks 
his presidency was doomed from the day the public learned his tape 
recorders eavesdropped on every conversation in his office. 

"I now believe,'' be writes, "that from the time of the disclosure of the 
existence of the tapes and my decision not to destroy them, my 
presidency had little chance of surviving to the end of its term." 

The quotation, from Nixon's forthcoming memoirs, was in the 
Washington Star on Sunday. The Star is one of the newspapers buying a 
seven-part series of excerpts being syndicated by a subsidiary of the 
New York Times. 

The book, "RN: The Memoirs of Richard Nixon" will list at $1995 
when it goes on sale in May and special autographed editions are being 
offered at $50 and $250 

Once the existence of the tapes became public knowledge, Nixon 
fought desperately to keep their contents secret— a battle be finally lost 
in the Supreme Court 

HIS CLAIM was one of trying to preserve the concept of executive 
privilege. What he didn't say, and what he discloses in the memoirs for 
the first time, is that he feared his own presidency was at stake. 

Only a handful of Nixon's top aides knew that he had installed 
microphones in his desk and in wall sconces in the Oval Office, in the 
Cabinet Room of the White House, in his hideaway office in the 
Executive Office Building and at Camp David, Md 



Society of Civil Engineers ( ASCE) 
and the American Concrete 
Institute (ACI). 

Each canoe had two crew 
members and each crew member 
must have participated in the 
construction of the boat. 

The construction had to comply 
with the rules set up by ACI-ASCE 
and canoes were judged on quality 
of workmanship and appearance. 
The five judges for the competition 
were provided by the Kansas 
sections of ACI and ASCE. 

IN THE men's competition KU 
and K-State's "The Force" tied for 
first. The women from the 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, 
floated over the finish line for first 
place in their division while KU's 
faculty came out ahead in the 
faculty race. 

There was a 1,000 foot race 
course for each race and each 
team had to start and finish the 
race in its designated lane. Length 
and width of the canoes wasn't 
restricted but the paddles could be 
no wider than eight inches . 

The concrete canoes weigh 
between 100 and 300 pounds. K- 
State's canoes were steel- 
reinforced and made lighter than 
water by adding Styrofoam beds. 



Greek Week Special 

fvMcea me#4y/wtmaiAe flub 
ween <mw- 



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Mastercharge 
Woody's Charge' 



Wood's 



Men's Shop 




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THE 
ALACE 

inAggieville 

MONTH OF MAY SALE 

All cosmetics in the Store 10% off 

Including famous brand names 

like Milkmaid, Bonnie Bell, Revlon 

and Max Factor. 

Also check out the great savings on 
our Bargain Table of cosmetics & 
other items— Some Revlon, 
Yardley fragrance products all 
50% off or less. 




Front End 
Alignment 

SOUPENE'S 



1 US. 5th 



7764054 



Now's Your Chance..! 

to become involved in KSUARH. 
Positions ore open for: 

Communications Coordinator 

Newsletter editor 

Canoe Race Chairperson 

Fall Follies Chairperson 

University Activities Board Representative 

Contract Cancellation Representative 

Rec Services Representative 

Judicial Council Representative 

Applica' ons are available from your hall direc- 
tor and are due before 5:00 p.m. on May 2. They may 
be turned in to Michele Cochran (522 West) or Laurie 
Ogborn <547 Goodnow). Any questions? Call Michele 
at 532-3880. 



TUTORS! 



The K.S.U. special services program is currently seeking tutors for 
next fall. Rate of pay: $3.507hour for group tutors; $2.75/hour for in- 
dividual tutors. Qualifications: 3.0 G.P.A. in subject area, depen- 
dable, courteous, and ability to communicate with others of 
various backgrounds. 

If interested, attend GROUP INTERVIEW in K-State Union, Room 
206-A, Tuesday, May 2nd, 4:00 p.m. —OR— Wednesday, May 3rd, 
11 : 00 a.m., Room 206- A. For more details, call 532-6439. 

Kansas State University is an Equa I Opportunity /Affirmative Action Employer. 



COUNTRY KITCHEN 



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Manhattan, Kansas 

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We Have More of What You Want for Your Supper Dining 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Moo., May 1,1978 




Photo by Su*»n Pfannmuller 



PEACE, LOVE AND LOOK OUT... Dave Krlzman, sophomore In biology, gives 
his oppponent, John Taylor of Bethany, the peace sign with one hand and a tough 
return with the other in their singles match Saturday. 

Intramural meet draws 750 entries 



The 1978 Intramural Track and 
Field Championships were held 
this weekend with over 750 par- 
ticipants. Overall champions were 
Gamma Phi Beta in the women's 
division with 94 points, residence 
ball — Haymaker 3 with 67 points, 
independent — The Machine with 
104 points and fraternity — Beta 
Theta Pi with 104 points. 

Division winners were: (all- 
University champions are in- 




dicated by their winning time or 
distance) 

100-yard dash — women, Nancy 
Halpin 12 .5; residence hall, 
Charles Adams; independent, 
Brad Wagner; fraternity, Mike 
Riordan; 10.1. 

220 yard dash — women, Serena 
Schwarzenberger 29.5; residence 
hall, Dennis Grace; independent, 
Gary Adelhart; fraternity, Fred 
Ford 22.2, 

440 yard dash — women, Teresa 
Costello, 1:03.6. residence hall, 
Louis Brown :49.8; independent, 
Eugene Perkins; fraternity, Jim 
Dietz; 

880 YARD RUN — women, 
Connie Elchorn 2:36.6; residence 
hall, Brad Hafner; independent, 
Ralph Wilkinson 2:01.8; frater- 
nity, Bill Manning; 

Mile run — women, Teresa 
Costello 5:52.9; residence hall, 
Brent Burdge; independent, 
Edward Gordon, fraternity, Bill 
Manning 4:32.8. 

Two mile run — women, Teresa 
Fleming 11:23.2; residence hall, 
Brent Burdge; independent, 
Charles Gillum; fraternity, Keith 
Roegler 10:07.7. 

440 relay — women. Gamma Phi 
Beta 57.4; residence hall, Marlatt 
4; independent, The Machine; 
fraternity, Beta Theta Pi 44.4. 

880 relay — women, Gamma Phi 
Beta 1:59; residence hall, 
Edwards Hall B Wing 1:31.2; 
independent, Making Medicine; 
fraternity, Sigma Nu. 

Mile relay — women. Kappa 
Kappa Gamma 4:40.6; residence 
hall, Haymaker 7; independent, 
Gragey-Lujan-Perkins-Perkins; 



fraternity, Beta Theta Pi 3: 30.8. 

SHOT PUT — women, Chris 
Fagan 30-11; residence hall, 
Harmon Plunkett; independent, 
Paul Coffman; fraternity, Doug 
Nelson 56-7. 

Softball Throw — women, 
Melinda Bates 162-6; residence 
hall, Jim Black; independent, Joe 
Hatcher; fraternity, Stan Erwine 
299-7. 

Long Jump — women, Teresa 
Everett 15-8; residence hall, Clyde 
Brinson 2M; independent, Casey 
Jones 21-8; fraternity, Randy 
Heath. 

High Jump — women, Rhys 
Jones, 4-5; residence hall, Steve 
Armagost 6-4; independent, 
Howard Allen; fraternity, Gary 
Householder. 



Co-Rec 440 Relay — Fat Chance 
49.6. 

Faculty -Staff champions : 

100-yard dash — 30-to-39, Dennis 
Law 13.4 ; 40-to-49, Joe Smith 13.1. 

Two Mile — 30-to-39, Ron 
Sullivan 11:08; 40-to-49, Arne 
Richards 11:02.9; 50-to-59, Chet 
Peters 12:20.1. 

880-yard Run — 30-to-39, Jim 
McGuire; 40-to-49, Arne Richards 
2:25.3; 50-to-59, John Schlender 
2:31.4. 

High Jump — Mike Novak 5-2. 

Shot Put — Bill Zuti 31-9. 

440-yard Dash — 30-to-39, Jim 
McGuire 62.4; 40-to-49, Joe Smith 
66.8. 

Mile Run — 30-to-39, Mike 
Novak; 40-to-49, Edward Skid- 
more; 50-to-59, Chet Peters, 



ENGINEERING STUDENT COUNCIL 

Monday, May 1, 6:30 P.M. 

U205A-B 

Attendance is mandatory for 1978-9 

Council Candidates 



I TRANSPLANrai 

I kipneyshh I 



iSS 



FREE CAN OF WILSON 

TENNIS BALLS WITH 

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OF TENNIS SHOES 

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laa ■ Has** Owpe 

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'Cats please coaches 
at 69th Drake Relays 

The K -State foursome of Ray Hanf, Willie Major, Darnell Washington 
and Bill Tanner blitzed to a season best in the 4x400 meter relay with a 
lime of 3:07.9 to finish fourth and highlight the weekend for the Wildcat 
men's track squad at the 69th Drake Relays in Des Moines, Iowa. 

The Wildcats time bettered their previous season best of 3:10.2 and 
also met the NCAA qualifying standard of 3:09.7. 

"We were just hoping to get under 3 : 10," men's track coach Mike Ross 
said. "Tanner ran a great anchor for us. When he ran a 49.5 in the 
prelims we knew we had an anchorman. He has a great ability to finish. 
That's the strongest part of his race." 

The K -State women's 800 meter medley relay team set a school record 
in the event but still placed second behind Prairie View A&M who 
established a new American record. 

The K-State team of Sharon McKee, Jan Smith, Lorraine Davidson 
and Freda Hancock set the school record in the prelims with a time of 
1:44.1 and ran an impressive 1:44,2 in the finals but could not compete 
with Prairie View A&M which was an easy winner with a time of 1 :38,8 

"I was proud of the way we ran," women's track coach Barry An- 
derson said. "We continue to improve or time every outing. We can't be 
disappointed in finishing second when you set a school record and finish 
second to a team that sets an American record. 

Vince Parrette led the men's individual performances by taking third 
in the triple jump with a leap of 52 feet, three unit ™«- hn if inr>t>« 

In the women's invitational 1,500 meters, Renee Uriah captured fourth 
in 4:24.7. 



• ; . i 



CONVOCATION 



College of Arts and Sciences 

These five students will discuss 
their work: 

Lynn J. Graham — The Ha inner Monads Site 

Pamela Grout— SabUmlnal Advertising 

Joann Hamlch — Occupational Development of University 
Prof eaten 

Grace Hwang— Women to Congress 

Court Decltfeea Particularly Af- 

Unton 
Roam 



Paula Jacques— ««pr« 
fectiag Women 

7:4*p.in. 

.YOU ARE INVITED. 



May 2, lira 




SPECULATIONS ON THE 
EVOLUTION OF HUMAN INTELLIGENCE 



"No ww knows the ■thtota't foot IHc* 
THE ATHLfTFS FOOT" 



BEST 
SE LLER 



I 

I 



I 



novin paperback 

at the 







k-state union 



bookstore 



«•"•" 



0301 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon., May 1, 1S7S 



I AC barely approves budget 



The K-State Intercollegiate 
athletic Council (LAC) approved a 
K.4 million budget for the 1978-79 
fiscal year by a vote of six to five 
in its regular meeting Friday. 

The deciding vote was cast by 
Chairman John Graham. The 
voting pattern was one of students 
and alumni for, and members 
appointed by the faculty against. 

Voting for the budget were Craig 
McVey, senior in health, physical 
education and recreation; Ted 
Knopp, junior in agricultural 
economics; alumni represen- 
tatives John Fraser and Dick 
Spencer (who voted by proxy); 
Allison Luthi, senior in social 
science and Graham. 

In opposition were Carol 
Oukrop, associate professor of 
journalism; Pat Green, vice- 
president for academic affairs; 
Betsy Bergen associate professor 
of family and child development; 
Hank Camp (who voted by proxy), 
assistant professor of social an- 
thropology and social work and 
David Laurie, assistant professor 
of health, physical educaton and 
recreation. 

'Cats lose three, 
win one vs. OU 

The Wildcat baseball squad 
dropped three of four games to 
Oklahoma over the weekend. 

Oklahoma wrapped up its 
second straight western division 
title Friday with 2-1 and 11-1 wins. 
Oklahoma won the first game 
Saturday, 3-2, and K-State 
grabbed the second one, 6-4. 



THE APPROVED budget is for 
$2,435,100; which is an 8.3 percent 
increase over this year. 

The bottom line figure for each 
sport and the percent increase 
over this year are: football — 
$i.()64,6io (4.5); men's basketball 
— $301,920 (7,2); women's 
basketball - 106,190 (7.3); 
baseball - $44,930 (9.9); men's 
track - $93,490 (4.0); women's 
track $63,130 (7.0); softball — 
$17,600 (17.0) ; volleyball — $19,050 
(11.5); golf - $7,310 (4.3) and 
tennis -$8,400 (16.7). 

The tennis budget will include 
the cost of hiring a women's coach 
and splitting the allotted amount 
equally between the men's and 
women's teams. 

For all sports except football 
and men's basketball the in- 
creased budget was put into line 
items, salaries and materials and 
services on game days. There 
were rare increases in these sports 
in scholarship aid, recruiting, 
printing costs and team travel. 

This was not the case in football 
and basketball The opponents of 
the budget argued that the other 
sports were not recieving equal 
increases line item per line item . 



MAYBE 

Golfers finish 8th I (DJJJQ 



at Drake tourney 

The K-State golf team finished 
H?ighth in the 18-team Drake 
Relays Invitational in Des Moines 
Thursday and Friday. 

The Wildcats' Doug Vaughn was 
second medalist in the tournament 
with scores of 75-73-72 for a 220. 

Netters get back; 
beat Bethany, 6-3 

The men's tennis team defeated 
. Bethany, 6-3, Saturday at the 
Washburn Complex. With several 
come-from-behind victories, K- 
State whipped the team that had 
defeated them 10-2 last year. 

K-State clinched the victory in 
doubles play with three wins. 

'Cats finish year 
with 9-30 mark 

The K-State women's softball 
team dropped the first two games 
U played Friday and was 
eliminated from the AIAW State 
softball tournament in Lawrence. 

In the opener the 'Cats were 
blitzed by the Kansas Lady 
Jayhawks 15-0. 

K-State finishes the season with 
a 9-30 record. 



. . .of the people we 
are looking for. We 
have openings for 
several people who 
would like to 
become Farm 
Bureau Insurance 
agents. If you think 
you might be 
interested, let's 
discuss It. 

Don Bonewitz 

2630 Farm Bureau 

537-0339 

FARM BUREAU 
INSURANCE 

FARM BUREAU MUTUAL 
KANSAS FARM LIFE 
KFB INSURANCE CO 



THE PROPONENTS said that 
each coach determines how his 
money will be spent so the bottom 
line figure is the most important 
item. 

The meeting opened with a 
surprise as Graham announced he 
had orally submitted his 
resignation as chairman to 
President Acker. Graham said the 
president had not acccepted his 
resignation yet, but that he would 
remain as chairman if changes in 
the format and make-up of the 
board were made. 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
BANQUET-DANCE 

Saturday, May 6th 

6:30 at Elk's Club 
Tickets *6.50 

Available in Cahrin Hal 



SPECIAL SUMMER WORK 

for 

K-STATE STUDENTS 

"College students . . . had better hurry Jobs are to be had 
this year, but they're going fast. " 

U.S. News * World Report 
4-2*78 

A nation wide firm is interviewing at te- 
state today. May 1. 

Job Characteristics: 

• $250/ week for 12 weeks 

• Excellent Resume experience 

• Chance to leave Kansas 

• Challenge 

Job Qualifications : 

• Be hardworking 

• Independent 

• At least a 2.1 GPA 



For full details, come by ROOM 205C in the 

Union today; and compare this job with the one you 

are thinking about doing this summer. Don't dress 

•up, but please be prompt. Come by at 1:00, 3:30, 6:00 

or 8:30 p.m. 



Every Monday 
Afternoon is 

BARGAIN DAY 

at PUTT-PUTT 

3 Games for $1.00 

Play as many games as you 

wish for 12.00. 



WITT-PUTT" 

«Olf COUttf f fw 



ir 



lO 



W«at on Bwj. 

"Flay Today & Chase 

The Blues Away" 

Weston II. W. 18 




CLIMB THE LETTERS TO SUCCESS 



Success is o long way up But after taking the first step, the second one comes 
easier. 

Air Force R0TC can help you climb that ladder by providing a helping hand during 
college It can enrich your college years and also help you with some of those school 
expenses of the same time. 

You can compete for o two, three or four-year scholarship that pays SI 00 o month 
for college expenses, while it picks up the tab for all tuition, lab fees and books. 

The AFROTC program hos many extros. Like the Flight Instruction Program (FIP), 
where you qualify for Air Force flight training through o screening process and re- 
ceive introductory flight instruction You'll also learn about leadership, manage- 
ment; Air Force history and traditions, and much more through AFROTC. The pro- 
gram prepares cadets to take command after they graduate and ore commis- 
sioned as Air Force officers 

The list goes on Check it out today See if you can climb the letters to success 

and meet the challenge and accept the commitment You'll find that the Air Force 

is a great way to serve your country, and that AFROTC is a great way to get there 

from here 




vv /-wix mumott 



ROTC 

Gateway *o a greot way o* lite. 




For more information, 

contact Captain G renter, 

Military Science Bldg., Room 108, 

or call him at (913) 532-6600 




10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon., May 1,1978 



Britons inch aiong despite 
government metric order 



LONDON (AP)-The Labor 
government is having second 
thoughts about forcing Britons to 
abandon their yards, gallons and 
pounds in favor of meters, titers 
and kilograms by the early 1980s. 

"It is clearly impossible to 
proceed against a background of 
hostility," said John Fraser, 
minister In charge of the gover- 
nment-ordered switch from im- 
perial to metric weights and 
measures. 

"Resistance against the recent 
metrication orders has led us to 
review whether we can still claim 
universal support." 

FRASER MADE his remarks in 



an open letter recently sent to 
more than 100 organizations 
asking for their views on 
metrication. So far, the com- 
pulsory aspect of the changeover 
has roused ire in the British press, 
in Parliament and among or- 
dinary Britons. 

"There are a lot of little people 
in Britain who are tired of being 
pushed around by bureaucrats," 
said Anthony Beaumont Dark, 
finance committee chairman of 
the West Midlands County Council. 

The 44-year-old stockbroker 
announced last Friday that any 
project estimates submitted to 
him using only the metric system 
will be returned for inclusion of 



Spurs elects a male 
for 1 978-79 president 



For the first time in the history 
of Spurs, a male will serve as 
president of the sophomore ser- 
vice honorary. 

Lynn Rundel, freshman in 
general, was elected Tuesday to 
head the nationally-sponsored 
organization. 

"Until 1074 Spurs was an all 
female organization. Then it 
opened its membership to males 
like Mortar Board when Title IX 
was passed," Rundel said. 

To qualify for membership in 
Spurs, a student must have at least 
a 3.0 grade point average. The 35 
members are interviewed and 
selected out of approximately 250 



freshman stuoents on the basis of 
activities, grades, honors and 
dependibility, Rundel said. 

"The guys in the house (Far- 
mhouse) told me to join because 
they had a good time and it was a 
good opportunity to meet a lot of 
friends. It's something to do 
besides study," he said. 

Rundel said he would tike to see 
Spurs work with the international 
program during his year as 
president but the idea hasn't been 
discussed. 

"We're here for any service the 
community or school might need. 
We want to serve people and seek 
involvement. I'm really looking 
forward to it," he said. 



Crossword By Eugene Sbeffer 



ACROSS 
lPro- 

5 Title of 
respect 
8 Maple genus 

12 Scent 

13 Tennis term 

14 Entice 

15 Travels to 
and from 

17 Church part 

18 Summer 
in Sens 

IS Pendent 

ornament 
21 Winged 

24 Cinchona 

25 Land parcels 
28 Orders 

30 Self 

31 Rapacious 
person 

32 Crude metal 

33 Converses 
intimately 

35 Agitate 

36 Table scraps 

37 Public 
warehouse 

38 Certain 
Hamite 

41 Pub order 



42 Black 

43 Praises 

48 Observe 

49 Flower 
garland 

50 Persian fairy 

51 To sow 

52 Sooner than 

53 Underworld 
river 
DOWN 

1 Fabled bird 

2 Commotion 

3 — Jones 

4 Medieval 
helmets 



5 Gratify 
8 One of the 
Ages 

7 Impresses 
again 

8 Its capital 
is Juneau 

9 Recipe 
measures 

10 Scottish- 
Gaelic 

11 Lively 
dance 

18 Indian 
20 Military 
force 
Avg. solution time : 27 min. 



mesh mmm hhsig 



HMK! :dEH "snraci 



aaam case hqmw 

rc^Dfej [IDE Has 



21 Herring 
sauce 

22 Word: 
comb, form 

23 Minute 
particle 

24 Wearies 

26 Biblical 
hymn 

27 — bene 

28 Leak 

29 Withered 
31 Cast 

34 Made low 
sounds 

35 Soaks 

37 Stately tree 

38 Qt y in 
France 

39 Orchestral 
instrument 

40 Small 
particle 

41 French 
girlfriend 

44 Poet's 
word 

45 Angler's 
need 

48 Arid 
47 Cardinal 
number 



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imperial units. He advocates the 
voluntary use of both systems "til 
tandem" so as to lessen confusion. 

There have been no recent 
public opinion polls on the shift, 
but letters to newspapers seem to 
be running strongly against it. 

Former Prime Minister Harold 
Wilson in 1965 reluctantly com- 
mitted Britain to change to the 
metric system. In 1969, be set up 
the Metrication Board to ease the 
transition under pressure from 
industrialists who claimed Britain 
was out of the metric step, 

THERE WAS compulsion in the 
British changeover until the 
present government of Prime 
Minister James Callaghan, 
Wilson's successor, pushed 
through Parliament the Weights 
and Measures Act of 1976. This 
provided for the phasing out of the 
imperial system, some of whose 
units have been used since 
England was a part of the Roman 
Empire. 

In the United States, President 
Gerald Ford signed the Metric 
Conversion Act in 1975 setting U.S. 
national policy for increased 
voluntary use of the system. There 
has been no action since then . 

Canada instituted a metric 
changeover in 1975 with the use of 
kilometers and Celsius, or cen- 
tigrade, temperature readings in 
place of Fahrenheit. The target 
date for a complete switchover is 
1980. 

Britain's European neighbors 
use the metric system devised by 
the Paris Academy of Sciences in 
1791. 

A timetable of cutoff dates was 
published in April 1977 after which 
use of imperial weights and 
measures for various commodities 
would be illegal and violators 
subject to fines up to 50 pounds, or 
$90. 

The first few cutoff dates were 
approved by Parliament with no 
trouble. Now, however, some 
members are balking at the en- 
forcement orders. Among the 
measures already approved was 
one requiring manufacturers to 
package sugar and cookies only in 
metric units as of April 21. 



Collegian 
Classifieds 

CLASSIFIED RATES 

One day: 20 words or lost, 11 JO, 6 
cants per word over 20; Two days: 
20 words or lata, 82.00, 8 cants per 
word ovar 20; Three days: 20 words 
or lest, S2.25, 10 cants per word 
over 20; Four days: 20 words or lass, 
$2.75, 13 cants par word ovar 20; 
Five daya: 20 words or lass, 83-00, 
1 5 eanla par word ovar 20. 

Classifieds are payable In advtnct uni«« 
client has en established account with Student 
Publication* 

Deadline It 10 a.m. day baton publication 10 
a.m. Friday lor Monday paper. 

(tarns found ON CAMPUS can ba advertised 
FREE lor a period not exceeding three day*. 
They can ba placed al Kadzl* 103 or by calling 
5324966. 

Display Classified Rate* 
One day: S2.00 per Inch; Three day*: SI 45 per 
Inch; Flva daya: 11. SO per Inch; Ten daya: 11.60 
per inch (Oaadllna la S p.m. 2 daya before 
publication.) 

Claaallled advertising l* available only to 
those who do not discriminate on the basis of 
race, color, religion, national origin, sex or an 
Maty. 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

SUMMER/FALL, females to share large fur- 
nished house, private bedrooms, more 160 
and up. Most Mile p*ld 1005 Vainer end 1122 
Vainer. 939*401.(121-150) 

AVAILABLE MAV 1 1ll fall semester 170 plus ap- 
proximately |B utilities. Own bedroom, fur 
nished, non-*mok*r. Close Call Patty, 534 

3150,(138-147) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share Wildcat Inn apar- 
tment tor summer Call Pam. 7764400 (14* 
150) 

FEMALE TO share nice, furnished apartment for 
summer with two gins. Two block* from cam 
put. 167 plus electricity. Call 532-9364 (143- 

un 

FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted tor summer and 
tall. One block from campus and AggievWe 
Call 539-4901 (143-146) 



FEMALE TO share comfortable furnished apart- 
ment On* gal to loin two others Private 
room, air conditioning. WO, utilities paid Call 
63426630T 7764710 (144149) 

ONE FEMALE to loin three other* In spacious 
apartment, main floor ot large horn*, lor sum- 
mar. Cloae to cwnpu*. 175. utilities paid Call 
539-2663 or 5394329. (140-149) 

HELP*. NEED two people to live In tour bedroom 
house two block* east ot Font. For June and 
July Washer, dryer, dishwasher, off -street 
perking. Call 7745507 or 537*327. (1*4 146) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE lo share tumiarted on* 
bedroom apartment, May 20th-Augutt 23, 
S56fmonth plus utllllfa*, 1658 Clstlin *7, 539- 
8704 (14*146) 



FALL TWO females needed 10 
bedroom, two bath, furnished duplex with two 
others 880/rnonth Includes utilities. Cloae to 
campus Call 776-7339. {146-149) 

UBEflAL ROOMMATE wanted. CtoM to cam- 
put, A gg (evil i* and park, utilities 
p*ld-*l00rmonth 776-7191. (145-148) 

LOOKING FOR on* or two roommate* tor sum- 
mer private bedroom, uta of swimming pod. 
Call 5374033. (145-149) 



SUBLEASE 



SUMMER: TWO bedroom luxury apartment 
Close lo campusJAggievllle Dishwasher, gar- 
bag* disposal, laundry facilities, balcony 
Rant negotiable. 537-2194. (1 39-1 48) 

SPACIOUS TWO bedroom apartment tor sum- 
mer— tumtahed. air, balcony, off street 
parking, on* Mock from Anearn. rani 
negotiable. Call 532-3631. (140-149) 

FOR SUMMER: Two bedroom furnished luxury 
apartment, cloae to campus, central air, dish- 
wssher, laundry l*cillitea. No pet*. Call 537 
1218.(140-1*9) 

SMALL APARTMENT for on* p*r*on for sum- 
mer only Furnished, *lr condllloned, C*r- 
peted, modern. 186 per monih. utllltl** paM. 
Call 537-4123. (142-146) 

AVAILABLE MAY 1, furnished room with acceet 
to entire house Also tut I sail I wo furnished 
room* tor eummer Cheap. 537-2681, Bruce. 
(142-146) 

SUMMER: ONE bedroom *p*rtm*nt across from 
Aheem, furnished, air conditioning. Call 778 
3639.(142-146) 

FOR JUNE and July, one bedroom good for two, 
1100. Two bedroom good tor three, 6190. Four 
bedroom. $200 Near campus Call 5374428. 
(142-191) 

THREE BEDROOM house, furnished, air con- 
ditioned, big yard, only two blocks from cam- 
pus, negotiable Available May 20. 537-1449. 
(142-146) 

SUMMER: FURNISHED luxurious, large 
bedroom comfortable for three, 112 block from 
campus, negotiable price! Coechiamp, 1225 
Clsflin Roxl, 539-481 1.*332, (142-146) 

HEYI SUMMER: IVj bedroom, accommodate 
two-three people easily greet location near 
campus, shag, cable, air conditioning, 
negotiable Call 5324787. |1 43-147) 

SUMMER— ONE be d room apartment across 
from campus Two or three people. Dish- 
washer, air conditioned, balcony. Call 774 
4329 after S-00 p.m . (143-147) 

SUMMER: 1% bedroom. Air conditioned Close 
lo campus. 121 2 Thurston. 937-2282.(143-147) 

AVAILABLE MAY 22. Close to campus, 
J1 lOfmonth. Carpeted, central sir, cable TV, 
laundry (acuities. Call 537-2044.(143-146) 

AVAILABLE MAY 22. Close lo campus, 
tl lOfmonth. Carp* led, central air, cable TV, 
laundry facilities. Call 937-2094. (1 43-146) 

MAY 20-Juiy 31. Furnished two bedroom apart- 
ment, central air. three beds, dishwasher, 
laundry facllltle*, reserved parking, close 
campus/Aggieviii*. 539-7664. (143-147) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT VI, across from Aheem 
On* bedroom, central air, furnished, carpeted, 
laundry. Early occupancy available Only f 120 
monthly. 7764964. (143-147) 

SUMMER: EXTRA large luxury on* bedroom 
apartment. Cloae to campus and Agglevtlle. 
Balcony, shag, centre! air. Rent negotiable. 
CaN 937-4989. (144-148) 

HOUSE: FOUR bedroom, two baths, dish- 
washer, carpeted. Iota of windows, on* block 
to campus, very nice, SSOOfmonth, 937-7213. 
(144-140 

FURNISHED AND carpeted apartment. Good tor 
one-three people. Convenient location. Call 
776-3468, rent negotiable (144-146) 

HOUSE: TWO bedroom, remodeled house. 
Three block* from campus Some furniture. 
Off street parking. $200 plus utilities Call 774 
3792 or 7746690. (144-148) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT #*, across from Aheem, 
Nice on* bedroom, furnished apartment, air 
conditioning, two balconies. SlSufmonlh. Call 
7764202 (144-146) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT Seven, 1 VI blocks from 
campus. One bedroom, air conditioned, fur- 
nished, carpeted, two balconies, laundry. 1123 
monthly Call 7760663. (144-146) 

SUMMER: MONT Blue two bedroom, luxury 
apartment. Air conditioning, laundry facilities 
Reduced summer rates. Call John, 132 Marlatt 
Hall. 9394301.(149-147) 

MUST SUBLEASE— June and July— lumujhed 
Mont Blu* apartment. Air conditioning, car- 
pet, cloae to campus Price negotiable. 537 
26780? 7749621 . (149-1 49) 

SUMMER, LARGE three bedroom furnished 
apartment, comfortable for four, half Mock 
from campus, very low utllltl**, St 80 month. 
637-7973.(146-147) 

LARGE THREE bedroom apartment a 
S2S6Vmonth or • 175/momh per room. All 
utilities p*rd, lurnlshed-two waterbeda, 
screen porch 7764366. (146-190) 

EXTRA NICE! Two bedroom apartment oft ot 
Kimball, east of CICO Park May 22-Juiy 31 
Call 9374620, rent negotiable (146-148) 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom, carpeted apartment. 
Central air, dlshwsshef. Cloae lo campus, 
cable TV Included, negotiable, available May 
22,537*764 (146-1501 

LARGE ONE bedroom apartment, air con- 
dllloned. furnished with dishwasher Two to 
three people 1010 Manhattan Ave. Rem 1150, 
call 932-3297, (146-190) 



HOUSE: MAY 20 to September t, one bedroom, 
f 100/monlh plus utilities, two Mock* from 
campus, 537-4762. (145-1 46) 



HURRY, HURRY I House— one block from 
Agglevtlle and 1/2 block lo campus. Nicely fur- 
nished, two bedrooms; two lo tour people, air 
conditioning, large yard and off -si reel 
parking. 537-7092. (144-1 46) 

SUMMER— SMALL one bedroom furnished 
apartment, air conditioned, excellent location, 
SllOfmonth, all utilities paid. 537-7963. (144- 
148) 

JUNE-JULY: furnished two-bedroom apartment 
tor Ihrss on North Manhattan Avenue. Air con- 
ditioned, carpeted. Call Tammy 435, Putnam 
Hall. (144-146) 

MONT BLUE duplex with all conveniences lor 
summer Two bedrooms, two baths, central 
air. close to campus. Negotiable. 537-6058 
(144-146) 

FOR SUMMER— luxurious two bedroom apart- 
ment, fully furnished, air conditioning, dish- 
washer. Cloae to campus. Rent negotiable. 
1010 Thurston. 937-4473. (144-146) 

END MAY July 31, Wildcat Inn, Jr., On* to three 
parsons. Across* A beam. Carpeted, furnished, 
air conditioned, laundry. S120 monthly. 537 
0292.(144-148) 

SUMMER-FOUR bedroom duplex, S70 per per- 
son. Air conditioning, dishwasher, two 
bathrooms. Utilities paid, two Mocks from 
campus. 776-3628, (144-146) 

WILDCAT VI —early and late occupancy, aero** 
from fieldhouse, one bedroom apartment, fur- 
nished, central air, laundry. (130. 937-2342. 
(145-1*9) 

TWO BEDROOM apartment, furnished, air con- 
ditioned, all electric, dishwasher, half Mock 
from campus on Claflin, two-three persons, 
tl 20 monthly . Call 7744147. (149-149) 

SUMMER: LUXURY two bedroom apartment 
with dishwasher, central air, carpeting, and 
balcony Across from Goodrtow Hall 
tl So/month Call 937-4722. (145-149) 

COOL TWO bedroom furnished baaemenl apart- 
ment for those hot month*. Lund In Apart- 
ment*, one block weal of campus. Price 
negotiable. 7744394 (1 49-1 49) 



NOTICES 

MANHATTAN PAWN Shop, 317 S. 4th Street. 
776-6112— stsreos, 8-tracks, TV's, 
typewriter*, guitars, camera*. Buy-sell trade 
v«l) 

CUSTOM MADE 14 kt. gold wedding bands. Win- 
dtlre jewelry, 230 N. 3rd, Manhattan. (1 18tf) 

STEREO REPAIR— fast, reasonable competent 
repair of most brands Over 300 replacement 

i In stock. The Circuit Shop, through 
) Store 778-1221 (12111) 

SLEEP, THE conqueror with a sigh. Sleep, the 
dryer of the crying eye. Sleep, the (orgetter. 
Sleep, Ihe creation, on your waterbed from 
Rush Street Station, 617 N. Washington, J.C 
or Rush Street Exchange, Agglevtlle. Manhat- 
tan. (141-146) 

ALVAREZ GUITARS otters you a saving of 

S66.68 on acceaeories and services when you 
purchase one ot their fine acoustics. Your 
local dealer I* String* 'n Things, 614 N. 12th, 
Agglevllle 539-2009. (144-190) 

FROZEN YOGURT on tap at Daily'* Daughter, a 
natural foods restaurant. Made only with pure 
wholesome Ingredients. 300 N, 3rd Open 
Mon -Set 1 1 00040. 776*207. (1 49-149) ^ 

HAVE YOU found a Job yet? It so, and your com- 
pany will be moving you, Hart Transfer and 
Storage would like to handle your move for 
you. Company-paid moves usually require 24 
estimates, and Hart Transfer would like an op- 
portunity to bid on your move. Our staff of ex- 
pert packers end furniture mover* realize how 
valuable your belongings are— and we guaran- 
tee that they'll arrlv* In the same condition 
they left in or wall pay for the damages Call 
7764633 tor a free estimate From Hart ot 
America to Anywhere In the World. (146) 

KSTATE FLYING club members!! May 2 
meeting has been changed to busy business 
agenda. This will be the last mealing ol Ihe 
school year. It la Important thai all club mem- 
ber* attend! I Time: 740 p.m. Place: Wetter 
230. Date: May 2. Outcome of this meeting will 
affect you 1 1 1 1*6-1*7) 



SERVICES 



RESUMES TYPESET, designed and printed by 
professionals get results 100 Impression s- 
S17. The Offset Press prints snythlng. 774 

317 Houston (231 1) 



RESUMES WRITTEN Irom scratch by 
professional writers Your resume Is written, 
designed, typeset, printed. 100 cople*ft29. 

537-7666(134155) 

LET MY fingers do tb* typing I Thesis, reports, 
resumes. Fast service, experienced typist 
June, 5324960 or 9394424. (142-146) 



ATTENTION 

KATER'S DRIVING School taking applications 
now. For Information call Key Inc., Manhattan, 
1(9,5374330.(104155) 



LOST 



REWARD OFFERED for return of Tl calculator 
SR40 with Mack case Lost In 218 Calvin Mon- 
day. Call Marc 4-49. 9394301. (143-146) 

LOST MONTHS ago— keys on small round ring. 
Include* dorm, car and several others Call 
539451 1 . Pam (1 09) (1 46-147) 



PERSONAL 



THE TWELFTH eommandmeni— Thou shall not 
provoke a nlnfa to anger. S.W. (143-147) 

CONNIE: GOOD luck tonight. I know you will do 
a great lob Love, Candy. (146) 

THANKS, THANKS, to Collegian Surf, OS and 
Mr. B for lunches, flowers and smile*. R 4A 
(146) 

0AILEY— THANKS for the memories and good 
times (as always, your style) Buckle down and 
graduate now— the world's awaiting. Love, 7 
Hours Eastward (1 46) 

SHORT FEMALE hippo seeks companionship of 
short male hippo. II interested, contact Sub- 
Mae (146) 

BETTY: HAPPY 21st. You're now old enough for 

me. No mora contributing to the delinquency. 
Two months, on* week to wait. I love you. 

Rick (1*9) * 

BARBARA JENKS— This weekend you became 
ol age Sounds great! Happy 21st One of the 
49 left (146) 

(Continued on page 11) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon.,M*y 1.19TS 



11 



(Continued Irom page 10) 

OES YOUR sue 12 fMt and BB eyes started the 
groovy times oil hare al Wildcat Country altar 
Hogte Introduced ua. Had a (lot formal 
weekend and hop* (or mora spazola limes 
before summer and Big A come Luv, Typhoid 
Mary. (14*.) 

WILD ROOMIES ol 607 With lights dim and 
music low, Cupid has struck thy hearts We 
sometimes wonder about those nature walks 
and wild motorcycle rides What would your 
mothers think? I (1*6) 

J.K.E.. I hop* you have a Happy 2isi Birthday 
Coma see ma; I have your surprise. Doe. (1 40) 

GREW: HAPPY Anniversary' Love la patient and 
enduring , ao rejoice alwayt. (Ver 20:11) Lova 
you, your Baby. (148) 

ATTENTION: INFO Desk. Thar* you lor being ao 
wonderful. I'll miss you. Goodbye Teresa. 
(«•) 

EDWARDS HALL We had a groat lima, hope you 
did too. Thank* for th* graal function, you're a 
groat bunch of guy* I 1*1 and 2nd floor Ford. 
(148) 



WANTEO 

TO BUY: Playboy*. Playgirla. Penthouse, Oul, 
Gallery and others Comics, paperback*, 
coins, stamps, milllarla, antique*. Treasure 
Chest. AggievWe— Old Town Mail (129-155) 

TYPING WANTED. HlghMt quality work: editing 
optional: extra-large typo available il wanted 
for speeches, usually Impaired. 539-4678, 
5:00-9:00 p.m. (142-149) 

ANYONE MOVING lo Tucson, Arizona In May? 
Would Ilka lo share a U-Haul with someone 
that can pull one. Call 537 €2*0 (145-148) 

MOVING TO Call lorn la. need someone to drive 
U-Haul truck. Call 537-8489 after 7:00 p.m. 
(145-149) 

RIDE NEEDED lo Bethlehem, Pennsylvania WIN 
share driving and gaa; leaving final week Call 
John, 5394823. (148-150) 



FOR SALE 

TANDY LEATHER kite, supplies, custom leather 
work Special orders welcome. Black powder 
guns, accessories, supplies, equipment Case 
knives, frontier, western accessories Old 
Town Leather Shop. Old Town Mall. (8011) 

COINS, STAMPS, military relics, antiques, guns, 
swords, paper. Americana, advertising 
memorabilia. Buy. sail, trade. Treasure Chest, 
Old Town Mali (SOtf) 

BUY SELL-Trade— records, tape*, coins, books, 
comics. Playboys, other magazines. 
Costumes available to rant. Treasure Chest, 
Aggieviiie. (BOtf) 

NEW— WE have a single els mem electric 
typewriter wtlh four different pitches— elite, 
pica, proportions! and microeiite Hull 
Business Machines, 1212 Mora, Aggieviiie. 
<1Wtt) 

USED VW parts-beetle and fastback. 
squarebeck parts up lo 1971. Body and 
mechanical. Call 1-484-2388. J*L Bug Service. 
(133tt) 

POSTERS. TAPESTRIES, used racorda. 
Playboy*, paper-back books, comics, Beam 
bottle*, beer trays, g lasses and mug*. 
Treasure Chest, Ago ie vine (134-147) 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS programmable 
calculators All models in slock at low 
discount price*. One year lac lory warranty Tl- 
58/59 solid sis la soltwsre and TI-59 pakettes 
In slock. Programming assistance available. 
539-5956.(137 155) 

12x60 Esquire, with nice arrangement, two 
bedroom*, fully carpeted, furnished, central 
air and heal, overhead/lie downs, 10x10 shad. 
778-7092. (140-149) 

1986 PLYMOUTH Fury III, good work car. needs 
some repair Cheap. 1200 or best offer Call 
537-4923 after 5:30 p.m. (142-146) 

10x50 GREAT Lakes mobile home. Partially fur- 
nished with new Frtdgldslre refrigerator and 
stove Skirled and located at Colonial Gar 
dans Mobile Home Park. 83.500 7764050. 
(142-148) 

1988 VOLKSWAGEN, good condition, good gas 
mileage. Call 532-3878 after 4:30 p.m. and 
evenings. (142-1 48) 

ZENITH ALLEGRO 3000 modular system. 1973, 
AM/FM stereo, 61 rack, turntable. Excellent 
condition, greal buy. 1250 Call '776-0429 
before 3fl0p.m. (1*2-148) 



PEANUTS 



SUN HANGgllder— Ilk* new Witt give lessons 
Call alter 5 00 p.m. 1-458-2526. (141-150) 

19S7 CUTLASS two-door coupe, MOO and ten. 
speed bicycle Peugeot, nice. S40. Slav*, 537- 
1449.(142-146) 

1983 FLEETWOOD. 10x80 two bedroom, par- 
tially lurnishad wllh air conditioning, available 
•Her finals. I2S00. 776-3847 alter 5:00. (143- 
147) 

CAMPER: 6 toot Spacecraft truck camper with 
stove, ice box. water tank, and gas bottle. 537 
8020 after 5:30 p.m. (143-147) 

TRIUMPH TR4A, 1987, must sail, a classic spor- 
ts car with spoke wheals, new top and metanc 
blue paint, look* good, runs groat, f 1500 or 
be* i offer. See al northwest comer 3rd and 
Bluemonl or 5394985 (143-147) 

USED GIBSON Les Paul Custom Sao at Strings 
n' Things, 814 N. 12th, Aggieviiie. 539-2009. 
(144-150) 

14'xBO 1 SCHULT moblt* noma. 1972. Two 
bedrooms Includes: furniture, washer, dryer, 
sliding glass door, kitchen bay window, storm 
windows, double Insulation. Call 53*9305 *l- 
ter 6:00 p.m. (1*4-150) 

FIVE STENORETTE dictating machines, on* 
portable slenoralle. miscellaneous ac- 
cessories. Sell to the highest bidder. Bids 
close May 8, 1976. Can be seen at Student 
Financial Assistance. FelrehlW Hall. Room 
104. KSU Call 532-6420. (144-149) 



Lindy's has purchased $1500 
worth of salesmen's sam- 
ples. Save 25-40% off retail. 

CHILDREN'S-sizes 3T-3, 6, 8, 10, 
12, 14, & 16. Includes jeans, tops, 
suits, and sportswear. 
LADIES'— various sizes includes 
jeans, all sportswear, and suits, 
MEN'S— shirts, all sportswear, 
and suits. Brand names include 
Hanes, Maverick, Lee, and 
Wrangler. 

$1500 SALE— 

Now going on at 

LINDY'S ARMY AND 

WESTERN WEAR. 

231 Poyntz 

Mon.-Sat. 9:30-6:00 

Sun. 1:00-5:00 

Thurs.tiU8:30 



1972 YAMAHA 650x52, 1500 mllos on overhaul. 
Runs excellent. Good condition, must sell. 
(695 Call 537-63*1 (1*4 1*8) 

1974 CUTLASS Supreme— excellent condition. 
All extras, good prlc*. super clean. Call 539- 
5038 allar 6:30.(144-146) 

8143 MOBILE home, skirted, washer, shod, on 
101, good condition, 81800— Call between 
4:3M;OOp.m -778-5478. (144-148) 

USED BROTHER electric typewriter Excellent 
condition. «90. Cell 539-4427. (144-148) 

1967 CLASSIC Camera SS, 150/295 H.P. 22 MPG 
New exhaust and paint, air conditioned, 
power, disc, till wheel, fold down rear seal, 4- 
spead with Posl-Trac Much more. 778-9721, 
(144-148) 

1970 VOLKSWAGEN Bug. Good mechanical 
condition Good gas mileage Dependable. 
AM-FM 8 track. Call evenings. 537-4336. (144- 
148) 

1972 CORVETTE Good condition, one owner. 
85,200. Tuttla Creek Trailer Cl. #38. 537-9410 
(145151) 

1969 NOVA two door. 307, excellent Shape, runs 
great, new tires. 8895 or best offer Call bet- 
ween 5:30-7:30 p.m. 539-1683,(145-149) 

12x80 MOBILE home, fully carpeted, excepl lor 
kitchen, central air and heating. 913-494-2315. 
VvA I n ut G rove Trai le r Park . ( 1 45- 1 55) 



10x44 STAR mobile home. Twc-badroom, fur- 
niahed, will consider contract. 82200 or bast 
reasonable offer. Call 532-5731 before 5 00 
p.m. (148-1501 

BASF (PERFORMANCE). Scotch (Master) and 
Memorox (Mr OX2) cassettes for recording. 
82.45 for C 90 Call Dick. Room 214. 539-5301 
(148-190) 



HELP WANTED 

OVERSEAS JOBS— Summer/year round 
Europe, S. America, Australia, Asia, etc. All 
fields, 850041200 monthly, expenses paid, 
sightseeing. Free Information. Write: BHP 
Co., Sox 4490, Dept KB. Berkeley. CA 9*704 
(128-147) 

COMBINE/TRUCK operator* for custom harvest 
J una 5-July 10. Excellent hourly wage plus 
board and room. Late modal equipment. 
Possible all summer employment 316-257- 
2759 Lao Schoufler. Starling, KS 87579 (142- 
148) 

DRUMMER FOR rock group Steady work alter 
June 15. Serloua inquiries only Call Randy. 
537 7738 alter 5O0pm (143-147) 

WAITRESSES OR waller* and bartenders Call 
539-9753 after 1 2:00 noon (1 43-150) 

TUTORS! THE KSU. Special Services Program 
la currently seeking tutor* for next fail Rata 
of pay: 83,50mour for group tutor*; t2 75/hour 
lor individual tutor*. Qualifications 3.0G.P.A. 
In subject area, dependable, courteous, and 
ability lo communicate with others of various 
background*. If interested, attend group in- 
lervlew In K-Stata Union. Room 208 -A, 
Tuesday, May 2nd. 400 p.m.— or— Wed- 
nesday. May 3rd, 11:00 a.m., Room 208-A. For 
mora details, call 532-8439, Kansas Slat* 
University I* an Equal OpporlunityfAlllrmative 
Action Employer. (144-146) 



The Dairy Queen 

at 1015 N. 3rd 

is now accepting 

applications 

for full and 

part-time summer 

employment. 

Contact Mr. Fry 
at 776-4117 



BARTENDER PART time, evening*, Bockers II. 
Hamad* Inn. Apply In parson at Office 525. 
(144-148) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: require hard working 
students Involves bookkeeping, marketing, 
and Inventory. No experience necessary, 
willing to relocate. 537-9014, after 5:00 p.m. 
(144-153) 

SUMMER EMPLOVMENT-and May through 
September — true Wcombine driver* n eeded 
tor custom harvesting. Contact Sieve 
Schneider, 913438-722S, Lincoln. KS 67455 
(145-155) 



LPN'S-RN'S 

3:00 p.m.-l 1:00 p.m. 

11:00-7:00 a.m. 

shifts 

Full and Part-time 

Positions Available 

Generous Salaries 

Apply in person 

College Hill Skilled 
Nursing Center 

2423 Kimball 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

DORM SUPERVISOR for KSU Upward Bound 
Program. 7 week program (June 5-July 21). 
SJOOrwaak, room and board provided. 
Qualifications minimum ol bachelor's 
degree Sand letter ol application lo: Tom 
Las* liar, Director, Upward Bound Program. 
Kansas Stste University, FalrchlkJ 212, 
Manhattan, KS 68506 532-8440. Application 
deadline: May 15. 1978 Kansas Slste Univer- 
sity is an Equal Opport unity/ Atflrmallv* Ac- 
tion Employer (145-147) 



DIRECTOR'S POSITION lot Consumer Relation 
Board, 20 hour* per week Must have 
knowledge of consumer problem* and 
avenues ol settlement. Applications available 
in SGA office and mual be returned by noon. 
Thursday. May 4th, lo the SGA office (980). 
(145-146) 

AGRICULTURE DEGREE -Have you considered 
the Peace Corps? II'* an experience thai can 
mean an exciting introduction lo international 
agriculture, a new language, knowledge and 
insight Into other culture*. You'll be using 
your degree to help other* and lo gain per- 
sonal growth. Paid travel; monthly Irving 
allowance: health care; 48 day* paid vacation. 
Must be U.S. citizen, singiermarrled with no 
dependents No upper age limit For in- 
formation about Ag protect* in the Peace Cor- 
ps, Contact PC Coordinator, Ed Long at 17 
Waters Hall, 9:30-4:30 MWF, or by ap- 
pointment Call 532 571* (148) 

WORK-STUDY secretary tor SGA. General office 
work, good typist. Notary public preferred, or 
be willing lo obtain a notary public com- 
mission from th* State of Kanaa*. Avenge 20 
hours/weak. Minimum wag e SGA is an equal 
opportunity employer (990). (148-148) 

I AM looking for undergraduate Social Science 
major* for an experiment. You will be paid 
83.00 for ivi hour* time. Please contact Mar- 
val Rota at 53*8778 or come 10 Den Hon Hall 
218, May 1st Irom 7 30-9: 30 p.m. snd May 2nd 
from 1:30-S:30p.m. (148-147) 



FOR RENT 



TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electric* and manuals; 
day. week or month. Buzieils, 511 Leaven 
worth, across from post office. Call 776-9469 
(Itf) 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS; excellent selection 
Hull Business Machines. 1212 Moro. 539-7931. 
Service most make* of typewriter*. Also Vic- 
tor and Olivetti adder*. (Ill) 

ONE, TWO, three bedroom fumlahed. un- 
furnished apartments lor summer/fall. 10 or 12 
month contracts. No pats. 537-8389 (119tf) 

JUNE AND July only. Two bedroom furnished 
luxury apartments near Aggieviiie No pets. 
Three or tour single students f 150. Call Rich 
after 5:00 p.m 778-1 488. (1 33-148) 

Furnished/UnJurnished 
Apartments 

•At KSU 

• One to four bedrooms 

• Most bills paid 

Phone 539-8401 

LARGE, NICE, fumlahed apartment. Three 
males. Private Parking. Reasonable. Knotty 
pine walls. Large bedroom, single beds For 
1*11.7784807.(140-149) 

WE NEED two to share comfortable 5 bedroom 
house with three others. Separated living 
situation or nol. 8355 monlhiy, 776-3757. (143- 
148) 



SUMMER RENTALS 

ROYAL TOWERS 
APTS. 

Two Bedrooms 
$135.00 a month 

Air Conditioning 

All Utilities Paid 

including Cable TV 

Contract June l^July 31 

$150 oo Deposit 

CaU 5394851 or 539-9510 

5:00 p.m.— 7:00 p.m. 



EFFICIENCY APARTMENT, available August 1, 
close to campus. !12S7monlh. Call after 7 00 
p.m. 537-0891. (143-148) 

NOW LEASING luxury studio apartment*. One 
block east of campus. Available June l and 
August 1. Mont Blue Apartments 539-4447. 
(144-149) 

NEW THREE bedroom apartments Un- 
fumlahed, a^OOrmonlh plus utllllle*. Air con- 
dliloning, carpet. 538-1882. (1 44-148) 



by Charles Shultz 



SOME PEOPLE TMiNK 
THAT ANIMALS WERE 
PUT MERE ON EARTH 
TO SERVE HUMANS 




ONE WONDERS UJHAT 
50KT OF RESPONSE LUE 
Ml6HT6£TlfU/EU)ERE 
TO ASK THE ANIMALS.,, 




no no mono HO 




S~t 




DOWNSTOWN 



by Tim Downs 




FOUR BEDROOM house, two story, on* block 
from campus For sin persons. 875 per person. 
Available June 1st. 537-4648. (144-149) 

ATTRACTIVE HOME In excellent neighborhood 
Four bedroom*, family room, air conditioning, 
carpeting, fenced yard, carport. 1325 
Available May 15 for family or mature studen 
1*. 5398202 (144-148) 



RAINTREE APT. 

2 bdrm furnished 
carpeted & draped 

close to campus 

dishwasher, no pets 

or children 

$300 per month 

Summer or Fall leases 

Call 537-4567 or 

539-1201 



COUPLE, FIRST floor of house Two bedroom. 
doe* to campus, garden space, garage. Un- 
furnished C«|| 537-7881 after 5O0 p.m. (144- 
148) 

PRIVATE ROOMS, efficiency apartments 
available now and June first. Close to cam 
pus 537 2344 or evenings 7784838, (144-148) 

PARKVIEW 

Student Housing 

Osage and nth St. 

Near Campus 

Near Aggieviiie 

• furnished 

• free parking 

• equipped kitchen 

• laundromat 
■ $55 and up 

Reserve now for 

summer and fall 

Phone 537-4233 



SUMMER: CLOSE to campus. Aggieviiie. 
Balcony, carpeted, central air. lumiahed. one 
snd one-naif bedroom apartment 
Reasonable Call 5374725.(144-148) 

TWO BEDROOM, partially furnished apartment, 
two block* Irom campus. 8225 monthly Leaaa 
and deposit. 5390671. (1 45-149) 



Low as $120 a Month 

Wildcat Inn Apts. 

For 

June and July 

Summer School 

Furnished- 
Air Conditioning 

WE HAVE 
LIMITED AVAILABILITY 

For More Information 
Call 

CELESTE 

539-5001 



JUNE JUL* , 1 v» bedroom, furnished apartment 
air conditioned, disposal, shag carpet, three 
blocks from campus Vary reasonable Call 
537O506 (145-149) 

SUMMER/FALL-two bedroom, fumlahed. 
nearly remodeled basement apartment with 
private entrance. Nice quiet si reef, close to 
campus, park and Aggieviiie. f 195 plus elec- 
tricity. 7784180 (145-149) 



NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 
from (165 

* FREE shuttle service 

to KSU 

* portion of utilities paid 

* adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

Phone 

539-2951 

or see at 

1413 Cambridge Place 



TERRIFIC TWO/three b e droom home, two 
blocks from university Carpets, dlshwaatwr, 
air conditioning, drapea, two baths, garage, 
fireplace Perfect tor small family 8275 * mon- 
th plus utilities Call 539-8985 after 5:00 p.m. 
(148-180) 

LARGE APARTMENT available Way 22. 1143. 
Two bedroom*, lull basement, central air, 
refrigerator, stove, carpeting. Prairie Glen 
Cooperative Townhouse*, 7704875. (148-150) 




Ptwtoby Dave Kaup 



CAN CONCRETE FLOAT?. ..The crew members of K State's "Tuttle Express," 
rejoice after winning the first heat of the fifth annual K- State Invitational Con- 
crete Canoe Race held at Tuttle Creek (puddle) Saturday. K.U. won the overall 
competition. (See related story p. 7.) 



c 



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ommunications 
Specialties 

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CB Radio 

Amateur Radio 

Background Music 

Public Address 

Jim-Pak Electronic Components 



Car Stereo 
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10% 



Discount to Students with K.S.U. 
I.I). Card During May 



ASK Needs You! 

Applications are available in SGS Office 
for an ASK Board Director and 
an ASK campus director. 

Applications due May 3 

THE BOARD DIRECTOR represents KSU on the 
ASK Executive Board which is the Policy 
making — decision board of ASK. 

THE CAMPUS DIRECTOR 

coordinates campus activities and 
keeps students organized and in- 
formed of legislation concerning 
Kansas schools. This is a paid 
position. 




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BUILD IT BETTER YOURSELF by Eds. Organic Gardening $16.95 

COMPOST GARDENING by W.E. Shewell-Cooper $8.95 

GARDENER'S GUIDE TO BETTER SOIL by Gene Logsdon $4.95 

TERRIFIC TOMATOES by Eds. Organic Gardening $3.95 

HOME LANDSCAPING Countryside Books $4.95 

RELUCTANT WEEKEND GARDENER Carla Wallach $7.95 

PRACTICAL GUIDE TO HOME LANDSCAPING by Reader's Digest $14.95 

BETTER VEGETABLE GARDENS THE CHINESE WAY by Peter Chan $4.95 

GARDEN ANNUALS & BULBS by Anthony Huxley $5.95 

GARDEN PERENNIALS & WATER PLANTS by Anthony Huxley $5.95 

EVERLASTING FLOWERS $5.95 

BASIC GARDENING ILLUSTRATED from Sunset Books $2.45 

GARDEN PESTS & DISEASES OF FLOWERS & SHRUBS by Dahl & Thygerson $6,95 

DECIDUOUS GARDEN TREES & SHRUBS by Anthony Huxley $4.95 



to 



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If*' 






k-state union 



bookstore 



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(DOT 



KANSAS STATS HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
'XOPLKA, KS 6&bl8 EXCli 



Kansas State 



Collegian 



Tuesday 

May 2, 1978 

Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 84 No. 147 




International spy swap ends 
with return of U.S. student 



BERLIN (AP)— American 
student Alan Van Norman, freed 
from an East German jail Monday 
in exchange for convicted Soviet 
spy Robert Thompson, said he 
underwent "rough interviews" and 
was put in solitary confinement 
when he did not answer questions. 

The exchange completed an 
international prisoner swap among 
the United States, East Germany 
and Mozambique that began last 
month. 

REUNITED with his mother 
here, Van Norman, 23, of Windom, 
Minn., told reporters he was not 
mistreated physically during his 
nine-month imprisonment for 
trying to smuggle an East German 
family to the West. 

"The psychological stress was 
quite high," said the junior biology 
major at Concordia College in 
Moorheard, Minn. He was arrested 
last Aug 2 in Gera, East Germany, 
and sentenced to 2'£-years im- 
prisonment. 



Thompson, 43, arrived from New 
York earlier in the day to finish the 
transaction that included Israeli 
pilot Miron Marcus, 24, who was 
released by Mozambique late last 
month after 19 months im- 
prisonment. 

A U.S. Air Force clerk in 1965 
when he was convicted of passing 
secrets to the Russians, Thompson 
was released from Lewisburg 
Federal Penitentiary in Penn- 
sylvania Sunday after serving 13 
years of a 30-year term for 
espionage. He was accompanied to 
Europe by East German attorney 
Wolfgang Vogel, who helped 
arrange this prisoner swap and the 
one involving downed U-2 pilot 
Francis Gary Powers in 1962. 

"I WAS a spy for the U.S.S.R.," 
Thompson declared before 
boarding his New York-to- 
Frankfurt flight en route to West 
Berlin. 

The exchange took place behind 
closed doors in the U.S. mission. 
An American statement said 



Thompson and Vogel then crossed 
into East Germany, a country that 
Thompson said has "plenty of 
freedom." 

Van Norman said he had no idea 
he was about to be freed. 

"My lawyer's wife picked me up 
from the company of state security 
guards and brought me to West 
Berlin. I cannot remember 
whether I shook hands with 
Thompson," said the student, who 
looked pate but healthy and was 
dressed in a three-piece pinstriped 
suit. 

Van Norman said he tried to 
arrange for the escape of Dr. 
Juergen Grafe, his wife and son, in 
the trunk of his car "for personal 
reasons— no girl friend, not for 
money." He said the mission was 
the idea of a group he met while he 
was studying in Europe last 
summer. 

"It was my first attempt of this 
kind," Van Norman said. "As far 
as I know, the family to be brought 
out is still in jail." 



Carter, Begin mark Israel's birthday 



Walking Tall.. almost 



Photo by Suian Pf snnmullw 



Call it an urge to look adults right in the eye or call it a 
boyish desire to try something new, but Derek Toy of 
712 Osage took to the stilts Sunday— with a lot of un- 
certainty and a little help trom his grandfather. 



WASHINGTON (AP)-President 

Carter and Prime Minister 
Menachem Begin celebrated 
Israel's 30th birthday Monday as 
Congress began considering a 
proposed three-way jet fighter sale 
that has heightened tensions 
between the United States and the 
Jewish state. 

The occasion for Begin's visit 
was a White House reception 
marking the U.S. observance of the 
anniversary of the founding of 
Israel in 1946. Carter invited about 
1,200 rabbis and other Jewish 
leaders to join him and Begin at the 
White House reception. 

The Israeli leader also planned 
to hold private talks with Carter 
concerning the impasse in Middle 
East peace talks. But it was not 
immediately known whether the 
pair would discuss Carter's plan to 
sell jet fighters to Saudi Arabia and 
Egypt as well as to Israel. 

Begin spent Sunday in New 
York, where he attended 
ceremonies marking the Jewish 
uprising in the Warsaw ghetto 
during World War II, and he 
planned to fly to Los Angeles for 



another anniversary 
late Monday. 



celebration 



SECRETARY of State Cyrus 
Vance greeted Begin on his arrival 
at Andrews Air Force Base but 
neither one took questions from 
reporters. 

In a brief statement, Begin said 



he was "very grateful'' to Carter 
for having the reception and was 
hopeful thai the peace-making 
process would continue. 

Begin, emerging from a two- 
hour meeting with Vance, ex- 
pressed optimism that Israeli- 
Egyptian peace negotiations can 
resume soon soon. 



Afghanistan 's leader 
fresh out of jail cell 



Carlin into race for governorship 




Kansas Speaker of the House 
John Carlin is expected to 
announce his candidacy for 
governor Saturday at six press 
conferences across Kansas. 

CarLin, a democrat from 
Salina, is scheduled to make the 
announcement in Topeka, 
Kansas City, Pittsburgh, Dodge 
City, Wichita and Salina 

He is also scheduled to be in 
Manhattan May It to meet with 
his campaign committee and K- 
State students. 

The 37 -year old K State 
graduate first entered politics 
in 1970 when he was elected to 
the Kansas House of 
Representatives. 

In the House. Cariin has 
served on the Agriculture and 
Livestock Committee, the 
Kansas Water Resources 



Board, the niduualiun Com- 
mittee, the Ways and Means 
Committee and the 1202 
Commission on Higher 
Education. 

He presently serves on the 
State Finance Council, is 
chairman of the Kansas 
Commission on Interstate 
Cooperation, vice-chairman of 
the Legislative Coordinating 
Council, chairman of the State 
Building Advisory Committee 
and chairman of the Legislative 
Budget Committee. 

In 1975, Carlin was elected 
assistant minority leader of the 
Kansas House and was later 
elected minority leader of the 
House By a vote of 125-0, Carlin 
was elected speaker of the 
House in 1977, the first 
democrat elected speaker in 64 
years. 



NEW DELHI, India (AP)-Nur 
Mohammad Tarrakhi, leader of 
Afghanistan's once-outlawed 
Communists, waited in jail last 
week for the outcome of the bloody 
military coup that brought him to 
power, Asian diplomatic sources 
reported Monday. 

Tarrakhi, a civilian believed to 
be in his late 50s, was freed and 
Sunday was named prime minister 
of the new government that gained 
rapid diplomatic recognition from 
several Soviet Bloc nations and 
India. 

The sources said that last 
Tuesday, two days before the 
revolt began against President 
Mohammed Daoud's regime, 
Tarrakhi led a mass demon- 
stration in the capital, Kabul. The 
protesters were demanding 
Daoud's ouster and decrying the 
killing of a Communist party of- 
ficial. 



TARRAKHI and six other 
Communist leaders were rounded 
up by security men and jailed, the 
sources said. 

By late Friday, however, the 
government had been crushed, 
Daoud killed and Tarrakhi 
released. His elevation to prime 
minister and chief of the military 
revolutionary council made him 
the only person whose name is 
known among the new ruling body, 
which may have as many as 40 
members. 

Radio Kabul also referred to 
Tarrakhi as president in a 
broadcast monitored Monday in 
Islamabad, Pakistan. Daoud was 
both president and prime minister. 

As leader of the Communist 
grouping, the Democratic Khalaq 
Party, Tarrakhi ran the risk of 
arrest for actively opposing the 69- 
year-old Daoud, who in 1976 
banned opposition political ac- 
tivity. 



Inside 



HOWDY l Clear skies are expected today, but not enough warmth 
to make ray-catching enjoyable. Details, page 3... 

HEY, SENIORS I If you thought you could get out of taking finals, 
think again, page 2... 

BELIEVE it or not, there IS an art to judging figures— but these 
figures have nothing to do with accounting, page 8... 

THOSE BEAUTY aids women are using may be a glittering finish 
to looking good for the day, but the long-range effects could be far 
worse, page 13... 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tin., May 2, t»78 



Supplementary power plant 
planned for Tuttle Creek 



Ail contraire! Seniors take 
finals 'like everyone else' 



By DAVE HUGHES 

City Editor 

A hydroelectric power plant at 
Tuttle Creek, which last week 
received tentative approval for a 
feasibility study from the 
Department of Energy is not ex- 
pected to compete with the Jeffrey 
Energy Center in St. Marys. 

"It ( the plant at Tuttle) will be a 
complement or supplement to it 
(Jeffrey)," said Joe Mulholland, 
director of power at the Kansas 
Electric Power Cooperative 
(KEPCo) in Topeka. 

KEPCo received tentative ap- 
proval from the energy depart- 
ment April 21 to conduct the 
feasibility study. It also received 
tentative approval for a grant of 
$80,000 to pay for the study. 
Mulholland said. KEPCo must 
match the grant with $10,000 of the 
company's money to bring the total 
to $90,000. 

The plant would supply power 
during the "peak" hours of the day 
(3 p.m. through 8 p.m. in the 
summer) when more energy is 
used, Mulholland said. 

This would help Jeffrey Energy 

Last day for FFA 
contest at K-State 

Today is the last day of the 
Kansas Future Farmers of 
America (FFA) Contests being 
held on the K -State campus. 

The contests, which started 
Sunday, involved over 1,000 
students from 120 Kansas high 
schools competing in agricultural 
contests. 

Today's events include an 
agriculture newswriting contest, 
agronomy contest and entomology 
contest. 

An awards program will be held 
at 2:30 p.m. today in McCain 
Auditorium. 

Correction 

One of K-State's canoes placed 
second and the other one third at 
the fifth annual concrete canoe 
race held at Tuttle Creek this 
weekend. The University of Illinois 
did not place. In Monday's edition, 
the Collegian incorrectly reported 
a second-place finish for Illinois. 




ALL ABOARD FOR 

T&T TUES.1 

(Taco A Tequila Tuet! ) 




• GIANT 
TACOS 

In Oar Own 
Flour Shells! 

• TEQUILA 
DRINK 
SPECIALS 

• PITCHERS OF 
MARGARITAS 



( only $2 «ct-upi ) 




Center with the energy demand at 
that time of day. 

Running the plant for six hours a 
day would lower the level of the 
reservoir three feet, but the lake 
would be replenished during the 
rest of the day, he said. 

BUT THE COST of the plant and 
its effects on the lake will be 
certain only when the study is 
completed. 

Mulholland said he expected a 
final decision from the energy 
department June 1 and said the 
study could be completed in six 
months. 

He said the reservoir could 
support a nine megawatt (900,000 
watt) generator and could serve up 
to 3,000 customers. 

A study was conducted on the 
feasibility of a power plant at 



Tuttle Creek when it began 
operating in 1962, Mulholland said. 
The study snowed a hydroelectric 
plant would not be feasible. 

But the nation was not in an 
energy crunch then, he said. Now, 
to develop the sources the state has 
for energy, "it is a good idea." 

If the plant is to be constructed 
the Army Corps of Engineers, 
which maintains the dam, will 
figure heavily in the plans, 
Mulholland said. 

The proposal or a hydroelectric 
plant at Tuttle Creek was one of 224 
submitted to the Department of 
Energy. Last week the department 
approved 57 of those proposals. 

KEPCo also sent applications for 
studies for Lake Wacando in Glen 
Elder, and Lake Perry. They were 
not selected. 



For those seniors waiting to have 
their worst fears confirmed, the 
words of John Chalmers, vice 
president for academic affairs, 
ring ominous: 

"Seniors take finals just like 
everyone else." 

The misconception that seniors 
are to be excused from finals stems 
back 10 years when com- 
mencement exercises were during 
finals week, Chalmers said. At that 
time, seniors either took their 
finals early or they were excused 
from taking them. 

There is nothing in the catalog 
that mentions seniors as ex- 
ceptions. They are undergraduates 
until commencement, Chalmers 
said. 

Instructors may decide to excuse 
any student from a final if they 
have an A average, according to 



guidelines in the course catalog, 
Chalmers said. 

Finals may not be given during 
dead week, according to faculty 
senate policy, Chalmers said. 

Every year rumors are received 
about teachers giving finals during 
dead week, but the instructor and 
class must be reported before it 
can be investigated, he said. 



give 




KIDNEY FOUNOATION OF 
KANSAS A Wf STERN MISSOURI 



WITH YO-YOS, IT'S FUN FOR ALL AND ALL FOR FUN 

If you think yoy know about fun footwear, think again. Because until you get your feet into a 
pair of Yo-Yos, you don't even know what fun is ! Step-right-in style— red, yellow, tan, 
navy, or black, $25; also clear vinyl uppers with multi-colored leather uppers, $25 
T -strap— white, navy, camel or multi-colored leather uppers, $25. 

Quarter-strap—red, yellow, white, 
blue or black shiny uppers, $25. 



Keller's Shoe Boutique 
Word M. Keller's 



328Poyntz 
Manhattan, Ks. 



Your "Connie" Headquarters 
in Manhattan 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tu... May 2, 1*78 



Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

More bargaining for Moro 

ROME— The Red Brigades telephoned a new 
ultimatum to Aldo Moro's family, threatening to 
kill the former Italian premier in a "few hours" if 
the Italian government did not immediately agree 
to bargain for his life, a Rome newspaper reported 
Monday. The threat was being taken seriously by 
the family, the paper said. 

Top leaders of the ruling Christian Democrat 
Party met for more than an hour Monday to 
discuss the latest development in the kidnapping, 
but there was no sign the government would soften 
its position of refusing to negotiate with Italy's 
most feared terrorist group. 

Man scales Sears in protest 

CHICAGO— A 25-year-old man scaled 18 stories 
up the face of the 110-story Sears Tower on Monday 
and descended safely after four hours, leaving a 
banner reading "Stop Killing the Whales" flapping 
from the world's tallest building. 

Joseph Healy was charged with disorderly 
conduct and the improper display of a sign after he 
attached the white banner with red lettering in 
Russian and Japanese to the western facade of the 
steel and glass structure. 

The banner, which also carried the figure of a 
whale in red, stretched from about the fifth to the 
eighth floors and flapped in winds of more than 20 
mph. 

Hunt on for cause of collapse 

PARKERSBURG, W.Va.— After visiting a plant 
that mixed the concrete used on a power plant 
construction site, six federal investigators tried 
Monday to piece together the cause of a scaffold 
collapse Thursday that sent 51 workmen to their 
deaths. 

"We're getting down to the guts of our work," 
said David Rhone, regional director of the federal 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration. 

Inspectors visited the Criss Concrete Inc. bat- 
ching plant in St. Marys, where the concrete had 
been mixed for work at the Pleasants Power 
Station cooling tower, the site of the disaster. 

Rhone said Sunday that the quality of the con- 
crete was one of four factors inspectors believe 
could have contributed to the collapse. The others 
were possible failure of the hoisting mechanism 
that carried the cement to the scaffolding 170 feet 
in the air, the hourglass shape of the cooling tower, 
and the manner in which the scaffolding was 
anchored to the structure and moved up after each 
day's pouring. 

Savings for check-bouncers 

WASHINGTON— The Federal Reserve Board 
moved Monday to eliminate bouncing checks by 
allowing consumers to authorize their banks to pay 
checking account overdrafts from savings ac- 
counts. 

Aimed at helping people avoid accidental 
overdrafts and keep a minimum balance in their 
checking accounts, the regulation takes effect 
Nov. 1. 

The service would have to be requested by a 
bank customer and would be available only to 
individuals, not businesses or governmental units. 

Monday's action affects banks that are mem- 
bers of the Federal Reserve System— about 1,000 
state-chartered institutions across the country 
plus 4,700 national banks. 

It does not affect about 8,000 state banks under 
the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. 
However, the FDIC plans to vote Friday on a 
similar move. 

When originally proposed, the rule included a 
penalty on consumers for switching money to 
checking accounts, either a service charge or 
interest forfeiture. 



Campus Bulletin 



) 



Local Forecast 

Clear to partly cloudy today with high in the low 60s. 
Low tonight in the 40s. High Wednesday in the low 60s. 



ANNOUNCEMENT! 
COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROOftAM IN DIETETIC* application* art 
being taken In Juitm 1ST through May 11. 

AIK CAMPUS AND BOARD DIRECTOR 
application* are aval labia in the SCS offlca 
and are du* May 3- 

PltlOETTE DRILL TEAM tryoirt* are In 
Ahearn Fleldhouse May! through May 5 from 
4 p.m. to* p.m. 

SOROR ITV RUSH APPLICATIONS tor tall 
mi are available In the Panhelienic attic*, 
nolti HOB. Deadline for registration I* July 
31 

AG MECM SENIORS composite picture* 
will b* taken at the photo aervlca, Calvin 
basement, at 3:30 p.m. May 2 and 1. 

TODAY 
OMICRON NU new and old officers will 
meat at 3W Anderson at 4:30 p.m. 

ADVERTISING CLUE will meet In Kadtl* 
Library at 7 p.m. tar officer election*. 

RUSSIAN TABLE will meat In Union 
Stateroom J at noon. 

LITTLE SISTERS OP THE PEARLS AND 
RUBIES will meet at Farmhouse at 7 : X p.m. 

PEP COORDINATING COUNCIL will meet 
in Union 103 at a p.m. 

LAMBOA CHI ALPHA CRESCENTS will 
meet at the Lambda Chi Alpha house at J : JO 
p.m. Executive meeting at 7 p.m. 

LITTLE SISTERS OP THE WHITE ROSE 

will meet at the Sigma Nu house at * p.m. for 
•laciion*. 

SHE DUi will meet at the Delta Upsllon 
house at 9:30 p m, 

FORESTRY CLUB will meat In Call 121 at J 
p.m. tor elections. 

RHOMATES will meet al HlbatM Hut at 
5:30 p.m. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AORI- 

cultural engineers will meet in 

Seaton 236 at 7:30 p.m. 

HORTICULTURE CLUB win meat In 
Waters IB at 7:30 p.m. 

BLACK STUDENT UNION will meet In 
union 213 at • p.m. to welcome new officers. 

BLOCK A BRIDLE Will meet In Weber 107 
at 7:30 p.m. 



AMERICAN STUDENTS FOR IN- 
TERNATIONAL AWARENESS will meat at 
the International Student Center at 7 p.m. for 

elections. 

COMMITTEE ON WOMEN'S HEALTH wilt 
meat at the Wdman't Center, 411 Poynfi, at 
7:10 p.m. 

PRE- PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUE will 
meat in Ackert lie at • p.m. 

CANOEING IN KANSAS Will meet at the 
UFM house at 7 M p.m. for distribution of 
summer trip schedule 

SISTERS OF THE GOLD ROSE Will meat 
et the Beta Sig house at 4:30 p.m. 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CLUB and 
interested parsons meet In front of the Union 
at J:15 p.m. for rides to Valentino's for 
elections and supper. 

K STATE FLYING CLUB will meat in 
Weber 230 at 7 p.m. for elections 

ARTS AND SCIENCE HONORS 

PROGRAM: Senior Honor* Convocation will 
be in Union 111 at 7 p.m. 

■cacia girls will meet at the Acacia 
house at 4:30 p.m. 

POULTRY SCIENCE CLUB Will meet in 
Call 10* at 7:30 p.m. 

STUDENT DIETETIC ASSOCIATION Will 
meat In Justin 110 at 4:30 p.m for off leer 
election*. 

WEDNESDAY 
PRE- LAW CLUB organ national meeting 
will be In Eisenhower IS at I p.m. All In- 
terested in attending law school are Invited. 



KSU AMATEUR RADIO CLUB will meal at 
Dark Horse Tavern at t x p.m. 

GERMAN TABLE Will meat In Union 
Stateroom 1 at 12:30 p.m. 

NATIONAL AUDUEON FILM ON ALASKA 

will b* shown In Ackert 1»at 7 30 p.m. 

KSU YOUNG DEMOCRATS will moat in 
Union 713 at 7 p.m. 

THURSDAY 
SOCIAL WORK CLUB will meat in Union 
105C at 4:30 p.m. 

CENTER FOR AGING SEMINAR will be In 
the Union Sunflower room at 12:30 p.m. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION 
will meet at Oantorth Chapel at 4:45 p.m. 

FTD STUDENT CHAPTER Will meat In 
Waters 41 at 7:15 p.m. 

R HOMATES Will meet at th* AGR house at 
7 p.m. Attendance is mandatory. 

SWEETHEARTS OP THE SHIELD AND 
diamond will meat at the PIKA house at 
SIS p.m. Attendance Is mandatory. 




COMM. SPEC. LTD. 
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Car Stereo | CB Radio 
Ham Radio 



STARVING? 



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• THE BEST FOOD IN TOWN) 

Piping hot specialities every 
night 5-1 1 p. m . except Sundays . ' 

• DELICIOUS SANDWICHES ANYTIME! 

< V« lb. meat, plenty of later tots 4 garnish) 



- _ COUNTRY SWING— ROCK & ROLL 

ALSO: AND WILD AND CRAZY GAME ROOM 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 
NEEDED: 

...We're building up our Staff 



Each spring for three years American Composite Corporation has 
advertised for and hired college age people to be on our staff with 
ads like this. Now, its that time again. 

Our first year in business required 5 photographers and over the 
years we've expanded to where we now need at least 20. 

If you'd like a position inside a dynamic, fast growing company, or 
would simply like to take a year out of school to learn, make money 
and do some travelling, then you'd better contact us now. 

We're looking for intellegent, well groomed individuals who will 
work hard to learn and do a good job for us in the field. A little 
photographic experience is a definite plus. 

We offer extensive paid training, salary plus expenses and of cour- 
se we furnish all photographic equipment and supplies. 

Write today for an application to: 



Mr. Dennis Moore 

Assistant Director of Photography 

American Composite Corporation 

P.O. Box 19672 

Kansas City, Missouri 64141 




I 

Its 

ghosts 
are 

among us 



—Opinions — 

Article* appearing on this page do «"' necessarily represent Iht entire Cetletvan 
stafl or m« board oi Student Puei.ca'toni 



It has been three years since the Vietnam War came 
to a much-hailed end for the United States. 

Although it continues in different veins today, 
America ignores it. It is a nightmarish memory the 
country would like to forget. 

Foreign correspondents come-home and columnists 
have been writing about it lately because it was three 
years ago last Sunday that the questionable war drew 
to a close for Uncle Sam. 

Families mourn the deaths of sons or husbands who 
never returned home. Others are subjected to a dif- 
ferent kind of mourning for a soldier who ended up in a 
prisoner of war camp or missing in action. They are 
not forgotten. Scores of Vietnam refugees came to the 
United States and they, too, serve as constant 
reminders. 



SATURDAY on a St. Louis television station, a 
Vietnam veteran stressed to a high school class the 
importance of a worldwide struggle for human rights. 
A high school student remarked she didn*t care about 
human rights; she just wanted money. She and other 
blacks were angry because the refugees were getting 
jobs they felt should have been theirs. 

The attitude is a selfish one, but not uncommon. Let 
us hope on this anniversary of a war's end, Americans 
can come together as Americans and work for the 
rights of all, and extend its graciousness to the less 
fortunate who come to our country for refuge. 

VELINA HOUSTON 
Editorial Editor 



WE /^INSIST ON WMNNIN6 
' mm ASAINST 
WE 6AIN ~ 
.SONS IN 

OURCREW0 



vmWmJm 




6HJ8tt»fi 



CITIZEN VANCE -I97S 



SEC. OF STATE VWffi -978 



Letters to the editor 



Ag's got the brawny ones 



Editor. 



RE: "The new Black Book," et. 
a), in the April 28 Collegian. 

Girls, all I can say is you better 
change your majors before your 
eyesight is totally gone, distorted 
or otherwise impaired if you really 
believe all those journalism men 
(?) are the best. Besides having 
the second largest enrollment, the 
College of Agriculture has the best 
looking men around. In addition, 
many of these farm-reared males 
are the brawniest, most polite 
creatures on campus. After a 



summer, spring oreak or weekend 
helping out on the farm, these men 
also sport the best looking tans and 
sun-lightened hair to boot. 

You've got to be kidding with 
your remark about the head of the 
journalism department. We've got 
three men who can out do him 
anytime in cow milking, especially 
when it comes to having their 
natural color hair. These will in- 
clude Roger Mitchell, college vice 
president; David Mugler, acting 
dean; and, especially, Larry 
Erpelding, assistant dean. 

So, if you feel the need to change 



your curriculum, I would suggest 
that the best in the way of advisors 
include: David Ames and Curtis 
Kastner, Duane Davis, Melvin 
Hunt and Mike Dikeman, animal 
science; Clenton Owensby, 
agronomy; Arlo Biere. ag 
economics; Charles Long, hor- 
ticulture... just to skim the surface. 
Try 'em, you'll like 'em. And 
they're intelligent, too. 

Karen Ericson 
Senior In animal sciences 

A double 



TUB WW 
/ 




insult 



Editor, 



Saturday, the feminist 
movement suffered what seemed 
to be a major setback in the form of 
the Miss U.S.A. pageant. The show 
was as bad as previous ones, but it 
should become evident how 
degenerative it is to the develop- 
ment of a modern attitude of 
women's role in America. 

To make us believe the epitome 
of womanhood is represented by 
beauty and bod is ludicrous. It is 
doubtful whether any crude form 
of intellect or well-developed talent 
was necessary to excel at the 
pageant; rather, it takes an un- 
dying allegiance to "settling down 
and raising a family," and trying 
to "stay beautiful all my life." 

Because of the forced smiles and 
shallow answers, I wasn't at- 
tracted to any of the pageant's 
"girls." It insults me that I'm 
expected to be turned on by this 
show of supposed, perfect 
womanhood. 

Mark Baus 
Freshman in veterinary medicine 



Grant Sanborn 

Golly, y'all are meen 

I J K Alt EDITOR, 

To my cumpleet astonishmunt, the Collegein din't run the news of my 
being awaded the cu vetted, "Most Creeativ Broom Jokky Award". The 
colege of envirunmentel manetenence don't get any cuverege in the 
Collegein. 

I wurked hard for this award. Where do you get off caling yurselves 
jurnilists? the head of our department, 0. Cedar McGee sent a news 
releese to the editor of the Collegean, Kris Willyums announcing when I 
wood get the award I don't know why she din't send a reportor. I gess 
she dont know what is newswurthy. 

I dont know why you guys cuvered that crap about Agieville being 
expanded when you culd have cuvered my award. 

Im not just mad about my award. You didn't eeven cuver our open 
house. We had all sorts of activities. We had hallway sweeping contests 
and trash can races. 

Did you guys cuver this eevent which was a land mark in Kansus State 
histery? No. You had to cuver sum dum car akcidint. Nobudy cares 
about sum dum littel kid who got his leg busted. Besides the pitcher was 
morebid. 

THATS ANUTHER thing. Your pitcher-takers arnt very good. Who 
cares about sum dum canoo race? You guys shuld take pitchers of 
studints. 1 took sum once of our 'Dust -pan 1' class and our teecher, 
"Swabby" Furgeson. Maby you guys wood put these pitchers in the 
Collegein I dont ha ve the negatifs because my Big Swinger camra dosnt 
have them. Butt, I have the pitchers. 

Im sending letters to Guverner Benett and Fern Miller to see if they 
can revoke your licence. 

A newspaper shuld be ritten by responsibul studints who are magering 
in sum thing besides jurniiism. In fact jurnilism shunt eeven be a mager. 

If you guys cant do it rite let sumbudy else do it for you. 

Im getting my Bachlers Deegre in Envirunmentel manetenence in 
May of 1979 af tur twelve years at Kansus State and I seen the Collegein 
good and I seen it bad. And now it is bad. You wood think you guys had to 
go to classes or summing Butt, your not fooling the studint body. We 
know you just sit around that fansy news room and play with those 
mashines. 

IM BLUDY SICK and tired of the Collegein ignoringg the studints 
intersts. You din't eeven give my adviser, Kirby Hoover, any cuverage 
when he got his PHd in Vacume Cleening from Broom U. 

Your sports cuverage is terribul. During the spring break, my freind, 
Splash Waterman and his brother Karp Waterman shot the rapids at 
Wildcat Creak in an innertoobe. It was a big dee). Blister Pilliager 
furnished all the food, (two Blister Berger Basckets) Butt, did the 
Collegein cuver this jurny? No. At the time you guys were making a big 
deel out of gurlsbaskit ball and futball probashun I ask you, Who Cares? 

I don't care abowt the futball teem thats for shur. They NEVER win. 

I hope you guys will shape up and kwit sluf fing off. I will be glad to give 
you help. 

I have a lot of newspapper ekspereence. I used to deliver the Caputa 
Picky une and I know what jurnilism is all abowt. 



IK Iliteret 



Kansas State C ollegian 

Tuesday, May 2, 1978 

the collegian Is published by Student Publications, Ine , Kansas State university, 
daily except Saturdays, Sundays, holidays and vacation periods 

OF F ices are in the north wins of Ked tie Hal I. phone 532 A555 

SECOND CLASS postage paid at Manhattan, Kansas MM . Publication No 2 9 1 02 o 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

IIS, one calendar year; 17.50, one semester 

the COLLEGIAN functions in a legally autonomous relationship with the University 
and Is written end edited by students serving the University community. 

Chris Williams, Editor 
Mark T indie. Advertising Manager 

Dennis Boone, Kay Coles Managing Editors 

Jett Anderson, Becky Bart left , . , . . News Editors 

Velina Houston Editorial Editor 

Tom Bell Photography Editor 

Barney Parker Sports Editor 

Kevin Bahner — , Asaf Sports Editor 

Beccy Tanner Feature* Editor 

JoleneHoss ., Asst Features Editor 

JaneHiggins, Lisa Sandmeyer, Kris Tilton Copy Editors 

Dave Hughes City Editor 

Doug Daniel SCA Editor 

Allison Erkelens ■ Arts and Entertainment Editor 

Paul Rhode,. Tim Hoian, Nancy Horsl, Jason Schalt, 

Bill Nadon, Dale Kei litem, Mary Wood Staff Writers 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Tim., Miy 2, 1978 



'■',' 



Letters to the editor 

'Holocaust' of Indians thrives 



Editor, 

I can't understand all the con- 
cern over what Domitrovic said 
because much closer to home, you 
find a similar situation as that in 
Germany. Since 1824, systematic 
forced removal of people from 
their land and relocation elsewhere 
(in preselected areas along the 
tines of camps) has been taking 
place and nobody except the af- 
flicted and friends seem to care. I 
am talking about the American 
Indian. 

These people were made to 
submit to a much larger military 
machinery, the authority of their 
chiefs was bypassed; their religion 
discouraged, and some ceremonies 
even forbidden along with their 
native language. 

The centerpiece for their wor- 
ship (their land) has been taken 
away from them. Their women 
have been sterilized without their 
knowledge until a few years ago. 
Can you believe going to the doc tor 
for a cold and, God behold, she 
can't have any more kids (must 
have been the fever or maybe 
something she ate!). I get the 
feeling some piece of paperback in 
Washington guarantees equality 
for everybody, but maybe it has 
been misplaced in the files. You 
know how it goes. It's a big office, 

Measles and 



pregnancy 

Editor, 

In regards to your article on 
German measles in the April 28 
Collegian, I am a little perturbed 
by the casual treatment given the 
subject. 

True, German measles (rubella) 
have no great consequence for 
most of the population. However, 
in the case of the pregnant woman 
in her first three months, rubella 
can cause serous complications. 
German measles in early 
pregnancy (first trimester) can be 
extremely damaging to the fetus; 
resulting in mental retardation, 
heart malformation, deafness, eye 
lesions and, even more 
debilitating, birth defects. In 
addition, some cases involve the 
death of the fetus. 

Women who plan to get pregnant 
can have a rubella test done three 
months before they plan to con- 
ceive. Immunization is available to 
limit any possibility of the women 
contracting the infection during 
pregnancy. It is important for 
women who suspect that they 
might have contracted rubella 
during the first three months of 
their pregnancy to see their doctor 
as soon as they can. 

I reiterate, German measles are 
not of major concern to in- 
dividuals, except those women 
progressing through the first three 
months of pregnancy. 

Ivrt Messinger 
Director, Pregnancy Counseling 



lots of employees. (It should be 
under "C" for Constitution.) 

Those things are very similar to 
what the Jews went through, but 
the American Indian's shout of 
pain, frustration and anger has not 
been heard. 

THERE ARE 11 bills before 
Congress which will terminate all 
Indian treaties with the U.S. 
government (that will total 371 
treaties broken by the govern- 
ment.) Another bill will do away 
with their hunting and fishing 
rights, another one will ration the 
water they can consume. Indian 
students attending K-State will 
have to drop-out because they will 
not have the tribal money to 
continue their education. 

It is a shame that the Indian 
movie producers in Hollywood 
haven't exposed the other side of 
U.S. history— the Indian saga, so 
"that it won't happen again." Well, 
it's happening today, here in your 
backyard and you can't see it. But, 
granted, how can you know if the 
media doesn't cover it. At least the 



Collegian took the initiative to give 
front page coverage to the Indians 
longest walk to Washington— that's 
more than the Manhattan Mercury 
did!!! A "big town" newspaper. 
Give credit where credit is due! 

If you want to learn something 
from the Jewish Holocaust and 
honor the memory of those who 
died in it, don't let those things 
happen here in the land of the free 
where a piece of paper called the 
Constitution guarantees freedom 
and justice FOR ALL. We must 
contact our congressmen and 
senators to put a stop to the con- 
tinuous efforts to disintegrate the 
Indian nation. 

Jerome Frieman was right when 
he quoted a philosopher as saying, 
"Those who cannot remember the 
past are condemned to repeat it." 
We must ask ourselves if we are 
going to allow such treatment to 
continue to the natives of our 
continent. 

Miguel Itriago 
Senior In anthropology 



K-Staters need to 



open 



minds 



Editor. 



I would like to obtain further 
information from Galen Critchfield 
(Utter to the Editor, April 28 
Collegian) on the causes of what he 
calls a severe case of "fag." I 
understand from his letter that this 
is an infectious disease and I would 
greatly appreciate some advice on 
how not to catch it. 

I just got over a draining cold 
and I have no desire to continue my 
spring be being bedridden with 
"fag." I hope science will come up 
with a miracle drug before I 
contract this dreaded disease so I 
will not have to spend my last days 
in a mental institution... even 
though the company would be 
some of the kinder people of this 
world. 

Open your minds, K-State, and 
accept your friends for what they 
are. This country has better things 
to do than appointing "fag 
capitals." And— if you insist you 
have no gay friends (whether 
known or not)— you are either a 
hermit or a bore. 

Now if you honestly think that all 
the people you are friends with are 
straight, I would like to know by 
what criteria you base this on. If 
it's because they don't act or look 
gay, then you have been watching 
too many old movies. Knowing if a 
friend is gay or not doesn't change 
the friend. They are still the same 
people. The only changes would be 
made in you. 

A good friend of mine surprised 
me a few years ago that he was 
gay. One year later, he became a 
Playgirl centerfold and because he 
was so "macho," they put him on 
the cover as well. At the photo 
session, he found out that all the 
other men in that issue were also 



gay, and that many of the past 
centerfold models were gay as 
well. The interview that was 
written about him routinely 
changed the words "boyfriend" 
and "lover" to the acceptable 
"girlfriend." 

Another gay friend works at 
Disneyland. When I visited, I found 
a great percentage of the em- 
ployees were gay because Disney 
insisted on maintaining the "clean- 
cut, all-American" image. The 
gays happily fit the bill. Think 
about it. 

Before you are so quick to 
eliminate, exterminate, ostracize, 
or put away family and friends, 
think of where you have to point 
your finger. You may lose your 
best friends. Learn to live with the 
people you've been happily living 
with for years. 

Larry Decker 
K-State staff member 



The Collegian welcomes 
letters from readers. 

All letters must be signed 
and include the year >n school, 
classification and the 
telephone number of the 

writer. 

Because of time and space 
considerations, the editors 
reserve the right to shorten or 
reject material at their 
discretion. 

Letters may be submitted 
(preferably typed) in either 
Kedzie 116 or 103. 



WHAT A MOUTHFUL OF FUN! 

HMWlMOf 
HMR*1 




And a small price to pay for so much fun! 
(Soft Tacos Not Included) 

<*►<£> lll9MoroSL 

, w , . „.„ ,.Z, Z 220 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 



offer expires May 17, 1978 



We are not just 
Pregnancy 
Counseling 




Our Free Services 
Provide: 

* Birth Control Counseling 

* V.D. Information 

* Pregnancy Counseling 

* Sexuality Counseling 

* Human Sexuality Library 

* Sex Education Library 



Walk in or call 

Ivrt or Barbara 

Counseling Center, 

HoltzHall5:V2-602 



• 




Thursday's 
Expression 

May 4 

K-State Union 
Catskeller 

Thursday's Expression presents an 
enjoyable evening of minority 
poetry, in the K-State Union Cat- 
skeller at 7:30 p.m. on May 4, 1978. 
Poets will be reading Mexican- 
American and Black poetry. Ad- 
mission is free, so come and listen. 



x \ Sponsored by Issues and Ideas 



1002AM 




^Styling bycPt&fessionals" 

MOD or CONSERVATIVE 
We're open 
Tuesday thru 

Saturday 
8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 





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—Appointments preferred— 

WESTL00P SHOPPING CENTER 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tim., May 2,1971 



TruffaUt'S melanChOliC film (Attention Engineering Students 

shows maniacal side of love 



EDITOR S NOTE: "The Story ot AdtteH." Ii 
scheduled to be thoum today at 1:30 p.m. in 
Me Union Little Theatre and at 7:30 p.m. In 
Forum Hall Admiulon lit) with student ID. 

By JIMCHAJFANT 
Collegian Reviewer 

"The Story of Adele H." is a very 
sad rnovie, dealing with the life of 
Adele Hugo, daughter of the 
famous French author, Victor 
Hugo. The film, coming from 

Collegian Review 

France and directed by Francois 
Truffaut, takes place during the 
American Civil War, in Halifax, 
Canada. 

Adele has journeyed from 
France, against her parents' will, 
looking for a Lieutenant Pinson, 
who is with the British forces 
waiting in Canada to possibly join 
forces with the Confederate Army. 

Pinson, who seems to want 
nothing to do with Adele, was her 
lover while in France. While in 
Canada, he lives it up, and has 
little interest in marrying Adele, 
although she journeys to Canada 
with marriage in mind. 

He tells her he will never marry 
her, even with the consent of her 
parents (which they will not give). 
Adele doesn't react by going back 
to France, but keeps bothering the 
lieutenant, although he keeps 
asking her to go home. 

AT THE same time, she is 
receiving letters from her father, 
begging her to return to France, 
which she answers with letters 
saying she will soon marry Pinson. 
The correspondence is very in- 
teresting and is used significantly 
by Truffaut; the viewer is able to 
learn more not only about the 
character of Adele, but of her 
father as well. 

Paxson will seek 
party's nomination 

TOPEKA (AP)— Betty Paxson of 
Topeka made official Monday her 
intention to seek the Democratic 
nomination for secretary of state. 

Long active in Democratic 
politics, she declared her intention 
to run for office a few months ago 
in Dodge City and has traveled the 
state in search of party support. 

Paxson and her husband, Donald 
Paxson, a prominent Topeka 
certified public accountant, both 
have been involved in the cam- 
paigns of former congressman Bill 
Roy, a U.S. Senate candidate this 
year. 

In her announcement statement, 
Paxson said she believes in- 
cumbent Secretary of State Elwill 
Shanahan "has erected barricades 
which have made registration and 
voting complicated and difficult." 



Join 

the 

Great 

Root 

Bear 



"Bite a 
dog this 

Tuesday 

for2T' 




Every Tuesday your 
neighborhood A&W 
Restaurant celebrates 
Coney Day. by 
lulu ring out star ot 
I he menu, Coney, for 
an unbelievable 29c. 
Coney comes with 
your choice ol Jusl As 
He is Coney Sauce, 
or with Onions. 
However you bile our 
dog. you've got lo 

say 

"There's no better dog In the 

world than Coney ' 

<j£w> 

3rd and Fremont 

Where our food's at good 

as our Root Beer. 



Adele tries everything to make 
Pinson her husband, furiously 
writing fantasies about their life 
together. One minute she writes 
about their having a baby, and the 
next minute she writes about him 
begging her to have him, although 
she refuses. 

The fantasies begin to take their 
toll on Adele, and she resorts to 
more desperate plans. She goes to 
the father of Pinson s bride to be, 
and urges him to call off the 
marriage, telling htm what a 
scoundrel Pinson is and how he had 
promised to marry her but instead 
fled to America. 

PINSON apparently works 
things out, for he ends up married 
and transferred to Barbados. 
Incredibly, Adele follows him to 
Barbados. By now she is reduced to 
a maniac, walking the streets of 
Barbados oblivious to all around 
her. Even when Pinson approaches 
her in the street, she walks right by 
him. 

Truffaut's drama is one of the 
strangest you'll see. Isa belle 
Adjani is excellent as Adele, and 
the fine and complex character 
that has been written for her adds 
to the intensity of the film. 

It's not a happy film, and has no 



great social significance. It is a 
splendid drama, however, and 
worth the price of admission. 

Although some viewers may feel 
they have been burned by foreign 
film-makers in the past, Truffaut 
will not disappoint them. Although 
the film is from France, much of 
the dialogue is in English, and the 
brief scenes done in French are 
subtitled well. 

All in all, Truffaut's "The Story 
of Adele H." is a good investment 
for a night's entertainment. If 
you're into new to European 
"artsy" films, as some would call 
this one, it's not a bad introduction 
to the genre. And if you're a con- 
noisseur, it's a film that you must 
add to your collection. 



Elections for Council Officers 
and Sophomore Representative 

Wednesday, May 3, 9 a.m.4 p.m. 

Vote in Card we II and Sea ton front lobbies. 
Bring your Fee Card. 




The automatic 
moped 
on sale at 
Mr. Moped 

312 S. 3rd 
1-5 M-F 9-6 Sat 



i 



TRANSPLANTS^ 
KIDNEYSf3B 



fe 



£ 



GOLO OR SILVER 

I WORTS D ft BOTTLED BY TKMLA JALISCO S 
ST. LOUIS MO BOPHOC* 




HA VINGAP*** ? / 

(TA - - i , 

/ WITH I 

JUAREZ 

TEQUILA 

When you're giving a party... 

Why not be the smarty... 
& plan a FIESTA WITH PUNCH ! 

Then your friends won't be tardy 

And they'll drink hale and hearty 
'Cause JUAREZ is the 

"BESTA THE BUNCH"! 



Kick on your Scholl Exercise Sandals 

and make a wish. 

Here's a chance at making your wildest dream come true! 




Sweepstakes void wherever 
prohibited or restricted by I 
Scholl reserves the right to 
substitute cash for any 
winning entry. Limit one 
entry per contestant. 



Enter the Scholl "Wish Come True" 
Sweepstakes. 

Entering our sweepstakes is almost 
as easy as kicking on a pair of Scholl 
Exercise Sandals. All you have to do is 
stop by your favorite drug or discount 
store and pick up an official entry 
blank (complete with contest 
rules). Then, in 25 words or 
less, send us your wish by 
August 31, 1978. If you 
don't have a special wish, 
may we suggest a few? 
How about flying to 
Paris and selecting an 
original designer outfit? Or 
riding an elephant in the 
grand circus parade? 
Or sailing away on a wind- 
jammer cruise for two? 
Or just taking off for anywhere on 
your very own moped? 
Winners will be chosen in a drawing to 
be held October 31, 1978. First-prize winner 
will receive a wish worth up to $5,000. 
Second-prize winner, a wish up to $1,500. 
And five (5) third-prize winners will each 
receive a wish worth up to $500. 
Here's wishing you luck. 



Scholl 



Better than barefoot 



OFFICIAL ENTRY BLANKS AND CONTEST DETAILS AVAILABLE AT THE 

SCHOLL EXERCISE SANDAL DISPLAY IN YOUR FAVORITE DRUG OR DISCOUNT STORE. 

OR WRITE: WISH COME TRUE, P.O. BOX 3044, GRAND CENTRAL STATION, NEW YORK, NY. 10017 

O 1978 SdwJI. Inc.. Pat, No*. 30634W 3088184 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Tin., M«y 2,19TB 



./ 



New program should ease 
high school-college switch 



By KENT GASTON 
Collegian Reporter 

A new student transition 
program will attempt to ease 
students' switch from high school 
toK-State. 

Orientation, enrollment and 
other contacts between the 
University and prospective 
students are being examined 
because of the changing need of 
students, according to Richard 
Elkins, chairman of a coor- 
dinating council which grew out of 
the ad hoc committee formed last 
year to investigate the high school- 
college transition. 

"Last year there was a thought 
that we'd been doing the program 
the same way for years and that 
student needs are changing, so 
there was an indication that the 
program should be changed," he 
said. 

"The University realized that 
this is a time of retrenchment, and 
after this year we will graduate 



fewer students," said council 
member John Lilley. 

"The question was how to get the 
largest pool of applicants to the 
University and how to get the 
largest number of enrollees out of 
the pool, ' ' Lilley said. 

"It's our position that we're 
possibly not getting as many K 
State students as we can educate 
properly." 

SUGGESTIONS to ease the 
transition have four major goals: 
to establish contact with 
prospective and new students 
through professional materials, to 
coordinate a total University 
program rather than separate 
programs from different areas, to 
help student assess their in- 
dividual needs and to maximize 
the pleasures and minimize the 
complications of being a new 
student through the first semester. 

One of the main changes in 
orientation is to establish a one- 



Commission will hear 
traffic flow ordinances 



The Manhattan City Com- 
missioners will consider the second 
reading of two ordinances con- 
cerning parking and traffic flow 
changes around the junior high 
school at tonight's regular com- 
mission meeting. 

The first readings of the or- 
dinances were passed at the April 
16 commission meeting. If passed 
tonight, one ordinance will prohibit 
parking on Ninth and 10th Streets 
next to the junior high school 
permanently and prohibit parking 
on the west side of 10th and the east 
side of Ninth from Poyntz to Pierre 
during school hours. 

Prohibiting parking at those 
times will lessen congestion 
around the school when buses 
deliver and pick up students, City 
Engineer Bruce McCallum said. 

THE OTHER ordinance will 
change Houston, from Juliette to 
Ninth Street, from one way to two- 
way. It will also allow cars to be 
parked on the south side of 
Houston. 

With this, the signals at the in- 
tersection of Juliette and Poyntz 
will be modified to handle the in- 
crease in traffic flow fom Houston, 
McCallum said. 

Show to go on; 
aerialist returns 

CINCINNATI (AP)-A circus 
aerialist, who fell 30 feet to the 
concrete during a performance 
here a year ago, plans a comeback 
with the Syrian Shrine Circus on 
Tuesday. 

"When I fell, it was at a 
children's show," Nancy Joy 
Giordano said. "I got so many 
letters, and the children were so 
concerned. It is important for them 
to know everything is all right." 

Giordano, 30. suffered 
lacerations and multiple fractures 
of her left leg and elbow, wrist and 
jaw in the April 20, 1977. fall. 



FUTURE CPA'S 

., ,.■ , i C6SSFUL STUDENTS 

HF*'»FSENT 

1/3 of USA 



KANSAS CITY 816 5616776 



CLASSES 
BEGIN 

MAY 22 



CPA 
REVIEW 



McCallum said the ordinances 
would go into effect on June 15. 

The commissioners will also 
consider forming benefit districts 
for the recently annexed Snowbird 
addition. 

The districts to be formed will 
provide water, sanitary sewer and 
street improvement services to the 
area. 

When a benefit district is for- 
med, the cost of adding the city 
services to the area is borne by the 
landowners and passed on to future 
home-buyers. The total cost of the 
improvements is usually divided 
equally by the number of lots in the 
district. 

The 36.93 acre area was annexed 
into the city at the Feb. 28 city 
commission meeting. 



day pre-enrollment in the summer 
with most of the orientation ac- 
tivities just before classes begin. 

If students are unable to attend 
the one-day session during June, 
students may drop-in during July 
or enroll by mail. 

"The two-day program in the 
summer was difficult for some to 
attend because they were 
working," Elkins said. 

In talking with the two students 
on the committee, Elkins found 
that orientation and explanation of 
things such as library use and 
drop-add didn't mean much to the 
student until fall, when they ac- 
tually needed to know. 

Another change is in the 
mailings to prospective students. 
The Univeristy Publications editor 
John Krider and his staff have 
developed a packet containing 
pertinent information to send to 
students. 

In the past, a student may have 
gotten letters from 10 different 
areas of K-State, including 
housing, admissions, financial aid 
and college, Lilley said. 

HOUSING has also been an area 
that has caused problems for some 
incoming freshmen. 

"There seemed to be an attitude 
of when the residence halls are 
full, there was no more housing," 
Elkins said. 

"After reviewing the situation in 
detail, we found that Manhattan 
has adequate off-campus housing, 
but the problem is getting that 
housing together with the 
students." 

Two graduate assistants have 
been added to housing director 
Thomas Frith's staff to help with 
off -campus housing. 

Other suggestions have been put 
into effect include the installation 
of an incoming WATS line to an- 
swer questions of prospective 
students, an earlier availability of 
the University Bulletin, and effort 
to increase the quality of advising 
for new students. 



^PSE' 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 

NEW PEER SEX EDUCATION 

MEMBERS: 



Jerry Sparke 
Bart Mullins 
Mike Berry 
Anne Miller 
Linda Hickok 



Susie Volker 
Karen Scheunemann 
Brian Hettrick 
Seavey Anthony 



.PSE./ 



MVA 



/wwA 



brother's 

Tonight and every Tuesday 
night is 

"LADIES NIGHT" 

'1.00 Pitchers 7:00-9:00 p.m. 
NO COVER 

<P.S.: Guys— You can't find more 
wall-to-wall women anywhere else in 
town oii a Tuesday night! ) 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
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Depl. of Pre-Deiign Prof mi loos 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tim., May 2, 197S 




HISS BEAUTY 



MOST BEAUTIFUL OF nC 




Beauty Pageants 



The sensual art of 




• • • 



y judging 



By CAROL HOLSTEAD 
Collegian Reporter 

The stage is set with glistening, 
white-teethed girls who listen 
anxiously to the master of 
ceremonies as he reads from the 
envelope. 

"And the winner is..." 

In a shower of tears and flashing 
lights, the crown is placed upon the 
head of the new beauty queen. 

Each year, girls of all ages and 
walks of life enter beauty 
pageants. These pageants vary 
about as much as the girls who 
enter them, from Miss County Fair 
to Miss Universe. 

Probably the two best-known 
beauty pageants are the Miss 
America Pageant and the Miss 
U.S.A. Pageant. 

Tlie Miss America Pageant, also 
known as the Miss America- 
Scholarship Pageant, centers most 
of its criteria on talent. The Miss 
U.S.A. Pageant places most of its 
emphasis on beauty and poise. 

TO BECOME a delegate to the 
Miss U.S.A. Pageant, a girl must 
first win her state pageant. 
Interested girls are interviewed 
before the state pageants as a form 
of pre-elimination. The state 
winner goes on to the Miss U.S.A. 
competition, and if she wins there, 
she goes on to compete for the title 
of Miss Universe. 

Miss America delegates must 
first win their city and state 
pageants. Before the city pageant 
there is a preliminary talent 
competition which selects 12 semi- 
finalists. The winner of the city 
pageant goes to the state pageant. 

According to Sherry Brane, 
freshman at Wichita State 
University and 1977 Miss Kansas- 
U.S.A., the Miss U.S.A. Pageant 
was started by the Catalina 
Swimsuit Company. The Catalina 
company used to work exclusively 
for the Miss America Pageant, she 
said, but when a previous Miss 
America refused to wear only the 
Catalina brand, Catalina broke off 
and formed its own pageant. 

In both pageants there are some 
strictly beauty-based com- 
petitions. One area is the bathing- 
suit category, and there seems to 
be mixed feelings about it. 

"I was not in favor of the 
swimsuit competition, but I think 



the judges felt that if you could 
walk down that ramp in front of all 
those people, you had the guts to do 
virtually anything," said Linda 
Olson, junior in home economics 
and journalism and 1976 Miss 
Kansas-Scholarship winner. 

Brane said she also didn't like 
the swimsuit competition, but she 
did it because she had to. People 
staring at her body bothered her. 
While reigning as Miss Kansas she 
was asked to pose for some 
swimsuit shots, and she refused. 

WHAT MOTIVATES a girl to 

enter a beauty pageant? 

Brane said she entered for the 
scholarship as well as the fun. 

"I really wanted the scholarship, 
but I went into it not expecting to 
win. I really feel like I'm the girl- 
next-door type, so it was really a 
surprise," she said. 

Heidi Teichgraber, senior in 
music and 1976 Miss Manhattan-K- 
State, said she did it for the 
scholarship and because she liked 
to perform. In the Miss Manhattan 
Pageant she won the talent award. 

All girls, however, don't enter 
beauty pageants for the same 
reasons. 

"I did it mostly for the joy of it, 
and because 1 wanted to win. That 
idea seems to develop more as you 
go along," said Lori Bergen, 
sophomore in history and 1977 Miss 
Manhattan-K-State. 

Once a girl wins she is on her 
way. 

Each queen reigns for one year. 
Her schedule is filled with 
traveling and personal ap- 
pearances. The higher a girl goes 
in the competition, the greater the 
benefits . 

"Right after 1 won, they (Miss 
U.S. A. Pageant) wanted to know 
everything from my dress size to 
what kinds of foods I liked," Brane 
said. "They really treat you right 
once you get to the top. 

"When 1 walked into my room 
there was a suit, dress, bathing- 
suit and jewelry just laid out on the 
bed for me. I got to keep it all." 

Diddy Bell, senior in radio and 
television and this year's Miss 
Kansas-U.S.A., is driving a 1978 
Datsun 280-Z which has been 
provided for her use. The car, 
however, has Miss Kansas written 
across it. 



"It really embarrasses me to 
have Miss Kansas written across 
it. In fact, I wouldn't drive it in the 
daylight until recently," Bell said. 
"When it gets right down to it 
though, it was either have a car 
with Miss Kansas written on it, or 
not have a car at all ." 

BELL WENT to the Miss U.S.A. 
Pageant Saturday in Charleston, 
S.C. Before the pageant all of the 
delegates were flown to New York 
for wining and dining. Then the 
girls were flown to Washington, 
D.C. where they got to meet 
President Carter. 

There is money in it, too. 

Winners of Miss America, 
recieve $15,000 as a prize, and may 
recieve as much as 150,000 for 
appearances. Miss U.S.A. winners 
are paid a flat-fee of $20,000 for the 
year they reign, and receive as 
much as $50,000 in personal ap- 
pearances. 

A winners' life, however, is not 
all play and no work. Pageant 
winners must reign under their 
title for a year. Town and state 
winners have their share of per- 
sonal appearances, but their 
schedules are not as time- 
consuming as those of Miss 
America and Miss U.S. A. 

"Just a few hours after I won the 
Miss Kansas-U.S.A. Pageant, I 
signed a contract conceding to 
completely live under the Miss 
U.S.A. title for a year if I won 
there," Bell said. 

GOING TO the pageant isn't 
exactly one big vacation, either. 
The main purpose of sending the 
Miss U.S.A. delegates to New York 
before going to Charleston, is to 
relax them. The pageant can be 
very exhausting, Bell said. 

"Some people thought I was on a 
big vacation, but I worked hard. I 
only vacationed one day," Brane 
said. "We had to be at breakfast at 
8 every morning. The days were 
filled with luncheons, dinners, 
autograph-signing parties and 
other things. We also had 
rehearsals and interviews. 

"Just filming us waving at a 
plane while standing on an aircraft 
carrier took two hours. It was all 
very professional." 

Most people tend to think that 
once a girl is competing for a title, 



all she would be able to think about 
is winning, especially on the 
national level. This isn't 
necessarily true. 

Olson said she was disappointed 
when she lost, but that she wasn't 
sure she wanted to be Miss 
America anyway. 

"By the time you get to the Miss 
America Pageant you feel very 
fortunate just to be there," Olson 
said. "Miss America has such a 
load on her shoulders. Besides, I 
was looking foward to a busy year 
as Miss Kansas." 

"One day I'd want to win, and 
one day I wouldn't. It was my first 
time to be away from home, and I 
don't know if I wanted to be away 
for a year," Brane said. "I was the 
youngest girl in the whole Miss 
U.S. A. Pageant. I don't think I was 
quite mature enough to handle it 
then." 

AS MUCH as the pageants are 
alike, they also have differences 
which sometimes cause confusion. 
People debate that one is better 
than the other because of what 
emphasis is based on and how they 
are judged. 

One point of contention is no 
talent competition in the Miss 
U.S. A. Pageant. 

' 'Even though they ( Miss U.S. A. ) 
had no talent competition, I would 
say that 75 percent of the girls had 
a talent they could have done. The 
girls weren't just bodies, they had 
brains," Brane said. 

Olson said another mistake 
people often make is in thinking 
that Miss America is a beauty 
pageant. In essence, it is a 
scholarship pageant. In fact, its 
official name is the Miss America- 
Scholarship Pageant. 

"The judges in Miss America 
want to know if the girls are going 
to make something out of them- 
selves when they get out of 
college," Olson said. 

Brane did say she thought the 
Miss U.S.A. Pageant was known 
more as a beauty pageant, 
whereas the Miss America 
Pageant goes for the more 
wholesome girl. It is a scholarship 
pageant. 

In both pageants people 
sometimes wonder if the winners 
have exerted some special per- 
suasive tactic such as money or 



sex, to influence the judge's 
decision. 

Brane said as far as the Miss 
U.S.A. Pageant was concerned, 
she knew of no foul play. 

"The judges don't even come 
around until the day interviews 
start. The only way a girl can in- 
fluence her winning, indirectly, is 
if she has a lot of money. Money 
talks as far as pageants go. If you 
have a big backer, it helps because 
you can afford better clothes and 
state costume," Brane said. 

NOT ALL WOMEN however, 
support beauty pageants. Some, 
especially those involved in the 
women's movement, feel they are 
exploitative. 

"I think it's degrading for 
females to be in beauty pageants, 
and have to stand up there in 
bathing suits and be judged on 
their beauty," said Maxine Lentz, 
director of the Women's Resource 
Center at K-State 

"They don't place any emphasis 
on intelligence. Even though they 
have talent competitions they still 
place emphasis on beauty. You 
don't see any fat or ugly women up 
there winning, do you?" she said. 

Meg Mathewson, chairman of 
the Women's Center in Manhattan, 
said beauty pageants emphasized 
first and foremost that women are 
appraised for their beauty, and this 
is exploitative. 

"I think because the prizes in the 
pageants are prestige and money I 
consider them to be prostituting," 
she said. 

"The day an ugly woman by 
anyone's standards, includng her 
own, can walk out on that ramp 
and present herself and win, I will 
consider pageants to be useful," 
Mathewson said. 

In beauty pageant competition, 
just as in everything else, every 
girl can't be a winner. Each girl 
has to cope with winning and 
losing. 

Bergen said winning Miss 
Manhattan-K-Slate in 1977 was 
really a surprise, but that the Miss 
Kansas Pageant was much more 
competitive. Now she wants to do it 
again. 

"I want to do it again. I already 
have everything I need, and I may 
have one up on everyone else 
simply because I have been 
through it before," she said. 



r 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tim., May 2, 1978 




Photo by Cralo Chandler 



Thanks (?) 

Dave Smith, a junior in animal science and industry, found an overtime parking 
ticket on his car Monday before he found his keys— locked Inside. To top it off, he 
got a helping hand in opening his wheels from Reese Jackson... the officer who 
ticketed him. 

Call for community-based corrections 



Calling for a "new era in law 
enforcement," Jim Marquez, 
assistant secretary of corrections 
for Kansas, advocated the need 
Thursday for community-based 
corrections, and said a new state 
prison was needed to replace the 
present institution at Lansing. 

Marquez, speaking at the 
Ramada Inn during the annual 
Law Day Banquet in Manhattan 
honoring law enforcement officers, 
told an audience of approximately 
60 persons it is virtually impossible 
to rehabilitate in the 113-year-old 
Lansing penitentiary. 

"My responsibility is to 
rehabilitate people convicted of 
crimes," Marquez said. "How can 
I do this effectively, when 
prisoners are still being housed in 
concrete and steel caging, and 
their (the prisoners') only thoughts 
are on how to stay alive. 

"When you try to put 900 people 
in ten acres of land and then try to 
rehabilitate them indivdually in 
this environment, it is impossible," 
he said. 

Marquez cited those examples as 
reason for establishing a new state 



prison, but commented it was not 
an easy job asking the legislature 
for money. 

HE TOLD the audience the State 
Legislature has appropriated 
$900,0000 to start a pilot com- 
munity-corrections program. 

"When this program is even- 
tually put into effect in Manhattan, 
the city and county will be able to 
keep people in the community who 
have been convicted of class B 
felony crimes," Marquez said. 

Marquez said that by using the 
local resources, members of the 
community could allow these 



people to keep their jobs and to 
seek help in halfway houses and in 
community and state 

organizations. 

"There are certain people who 
need to be kept behind bars," 
Marquez said, "but there are also 
those who can be left in the com- 
munity." 



It's 1 1 :N at night., 
I'm STARVING 
Where can I go eat* 
Answer pg. 3 




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Now's Your Chance..! 

to become involved in KSUARH. 
Positions are open for: 

Communications Coordinator 

Newsletter editor 

Canoe Race Chairperson 

Fall Follies Chairperson 

University Activities Board Representative 

Contract Cancellation Representative 

Rec Services Representative 

Judicial Council Representative 

Applications are available from your hall direc- 
tor and are due before 5:00 p.m. on May 2. They may 
be turned in to M Scheie Cochran (522 West) or Laurie 
Ogborn (547 Goodnow). Any questions? Call Michele 
at 532-3880. 




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10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tu«., May 2, 1978 



A Gale that pitches like the wind 



By JIM GIBBONS 
Collegian Reporter 

At six feet seven inches, 225 
pounds, he is an imposing figure on 
the pitching mound. He stares 
intently at the hitters and isn't 
intimidated by the potent bats of 
Cecil Cooper, Sal Bando and Larry 
Hisle. 

Yet this is a rookie, pitching his 
first major league game. His name 
is Rich Gale and he may be one of 
the starters for whom the Kansas 
City Royals have been searching. 

Gale pitched seven innings of 
shutout baseball Sunday afternoon 
at Royals Stadium against the 
Milwaukee Brewers. He was 
forced to leave the game when he 
developed a blister on his throwing 
hand. 

The rookie surrendered six hits, 
struck out four and walked one in 

Crew fares well 
in midwest meet 

The K-State crew fared well over 
the weekend in the Midwest 
Regional Championships in 
Madison, Wise, against 22 
universities and clubs . 

The men's novice four finished 
fourth out of five entries. The 
men's lightweight varsity four did 
not qualify for the finals. The 
men's novice eight fared better as 
they missed qualifying for the 
finals by one second, but then 
finished second in the consolation 
bracket behind Washington State, 
placing them eighth out of 15 teams 
in the division. 

The men's varsity eight also 
missed qualifying for the finals and 
ended up placing second behind 
Notre Dame to finish eighth out of 
10 entries in the division. 

THE WOMEN'S team had two 

entries, varsity lightweight four 
and novice eight, both placing fifth 
out of seven entries. 

In the open singles division K- 
State's Cliff Elliot and Jerry 
Arnold finished fourth and fifth, 
respectively out of eight boats. 

Wisconsin University was the 
overall winner of the regatta. 

Elliot, team member and men's 
varsity coach, believes the team 
will do better next week at the Big 
Eight championships. 

"We were disappointed with this 
regatta but we are looking forward 
to the Big Eight and National 
Championships," Elliot said. 

The K -State team will host the 
Big Eight Championships Satur- 
day at the Stockdale recreation 
area at Tuttle Creek. 

Hutch volleyball 
standout signs 

One of the state's high school 
volleyball standouts, Susan Drews 
of Hutchinson, has signed a letter 
of intent to play for K-State next 
fall. 

The signing of the 6-1 Hutchinson 
High product was announced last 
week by Wildcat coach Mary Phyl 
Dwight. 



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his first regular season game for 
the Royals. 

"I wasn't expecting to be 
brought up this soon but I was told I 
had a good chance to make the club 
later in the season," said Gale, who 
was the last player sent down to 
Omaha at the end of spring 
training. 



Qpo 



rts 



"I'm obviously happy to be here. 
I just wish it was under different 
circumstances. It's a crime and a 
shame he (Busby) can't throw the 
way he used to. Busby's one of the 
classiest guys I've ever known," 
Gale said. "But if you get a chance 
for your first major league start, 
you'd cut off your leg to get it." 

Gale's only serious trouble came 
in the first inning when he gave up 
a single to Cooper and walked Hisle 
and in the third when Cooper and 
Bando singled and Ben Ogilvie 
reached first on a throwing error 
by Fred Patek to load the bases. 

But Gale pitched his way out of 
both threats, getting Ogilvie to pop 
out to Patek in the first and retiring 
Sixto Lezcano on a shallow fly ball 
to center in the third. 

"I was real nervous out there. 
It's tough to throw when your legs 
are shaking," Gale said. "1 con- 
centrated on just throwing strikes. 
I've been throwing the ball good 



and I just let the guys behind me do 
their job." 

GALE HAS curly, reddish-brown 
hair and a neatly trimmed 
mustache which make him look 
older than his 24 years. He 
graduated from the University of 
New Hampshire where he played 
varsity baseball and basketball. 

He was drafted by Kansas City 
and has compiled a 26-14 minor 
league record over the past three 
seasons. He was a key player in 
Omaha's drive to the American 
Association pennant last year as he 
posted a 6-2 record with a 3.69 
ERA, 68 strikeouts and 24 walks in 
70 innings. 

Gale has a good fast ball which 
he complements with a slider and 
occasional change-up. 

"My fast ball and slider are my 
main pitches. But I throw the 
change-up to keep the hitters 
honest because my curve ball isn't 
too good ."Gale said. 

GALE WAS not surprised that he 
was chosen to start only two days 
after being summoned from 
Omaha. 

"I normally pitch every five 
days and this (Sunday) was my 
day to pitch. So I expected it," Gale 
said. "I pitched last Tuesday 
against Oklahoma City and it was 
my day to pitch." 

Now that Gale is with the Royals, 
he plans to stay there. 

"I hope this is the first of many 
more victories for me" Gale said. 



Bunker, Vaughn lead 
golfers' improvement 

Scott Bunker and Doug Vaughn have led a 30- stroke improvement by 
the K-State golf team this season. 

Bunker fired a 68-74 for medalist honors at the Missouri Invitational in 
Columbia, April 21-23. Bob Beymer and Doug Vaughn finished fourth and 
sixth, respectively at the Missouri meet. 

As a team, the Wildcats were second in Columbia, finishing four 
strokes out of first place. 

At the Drake Relays Invitational the golfers finished eighth in an 
eighteen team field with a 923 total, an improvement of 33 strokes since 
the beginning of the season. 

Vaughn and Bunker picked up gold watches at Drake by finishing 
second and llth, respectively. 

The squad's remaining meet this season is the Big Eight Cham- 
pionship, May 17-19 in Lawrence. 



r 



Bargain Nite 

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All Pitchers *C^?"? 



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CARTOON FESTIVAL 



Wed., May 3. 



10:30 



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presented by 

Kealurr Kilms 

|«M 



Chiefs expected 
to bolster defense] 

Houston's trade last week with Tampa Bay secured Texas running 
back Ear) Campbell as the No. 1 choice in Tuesday's National Football 
League draft and focused all suspense on Kansas City, where the Chiefs 
will pick second — provided they don't swing a deal of their own, 

"In many ways we feel this will be the most important draft in the 
history of the Chiefs," says scouting director Les Miller "It will be an 
organizational decision and we aren't sure what we'll do." 

A Chiefs spokesman said "more than half" the NFL clubs have ap- 
proached the Chiefs to talk trade. 

General Manager Jim Schaaf has said repeatedly that any deal must 
include the other team's first round choice, but beyond that the 
possibilities are endless. 

"A lot of the inquiries have been informal," public relations director 
Bob Sprenger said Monday morning, "people asking what our ground 
rules would be. I don't think there's been any specific offers yet. But they 
may be starting to come in right now." 

IN 1975, when the Chiefs vowed to rebuild through the acquisition of 
young talent, owner Lamar Hunt stated the club was three drafts away 
from playoff contention. That belief was repeated last January when 
club President Jack Steadman, after firing Paul Wiggin and Tom Bettis 
as head coach and hiring Marv Levy, boldly maintained that "one more 
good draft" could lift the Chiefs from their present abysmal state. 

For certain, the Chiefs' enviable draft position Tuesday has brought 
the team a lot more attention than the 2-12 finish in 1977 that made it 
possible. 

The Chiefs will almost certainly go after defensive muscle, regardless 
of whether they trade away or use their first round selection. Last year's 
Chiefs ranked dead last in the NFL in overall defense. And none of last 
year's three starting linebackers will be back. Names that seem to 
popping up with greatest frequency around Arrowhead Stadium are Art 
Still, Kentucky defensive lineman, and Ross Browner, Notre Dame 
defensive end. Wide receiver Wes Chandler is also highly rated by the 
Chiefs' brain trust. 



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British lieutenant. As Adele, beautiful Isabelle Adjani gives a brilliant per- 
formance, completely conveying the obsessiveness, the sell-preoccupation 
and the inclination toward destruction of a woman whose attention is lixed 
totally on one man. 

*7('s Trufaul's most passionate work. It is a musical, tilting titm with a tidal pull 
to it. Adele is a riveting, great character No one before Trufaut has ever treated 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Tun., May2,1»7S 



11 



- Barney Parker 



'We've always been the underdog' 



"• Friday afternoon the phone rang 
in Jack Hartman's office. After a 
few minutes Hartman hung up and 
quickly summarized the con- 
versation. 

"That was some faculty member 
trying to help us recruit," Hart- 
man said. "And you know that's 
great. Some little old kid we 
probably won't be able to use, but 
that's what we need." 

Hartman was referring not only 
to the obvious need for help in 
recruiting, but also to a needed 
resurgence of pride in K-State by 
K-Staters. 

Hartman said it's been a good 
recruiting season, but he admits 
the negative publicity over the past 
year hindered recruiting efforts. 

"All of our bad publicity has hurt 
our recruiting, there's ho question 
about it," he said. "In fact, it cost 
us one young man. 

"However, it's time all K-State 
people got their heads up and 
called upon all their pride and 
determination to gain back any 
ground we might have lost. We've 
got to get back to where we were. 

"At Kansas State we're fighting 
with a short stick and we always 
will," Hartman said. "We've been 
down, there's no question about it. 
It's been depressing, but we're 
past that now. We're motivated." 

HARTMAN EXPRESSED 

confidence in President Duane 
Acker who has drawn criticism 
throughout the athletic depart- 
ment's troubles. 

"President Acker is solidly 
backing our program, Hartman 
said. "Certainly his tenure has 
been beset with problems and 
these situations have made it awk- 
ward for him." 

Athletic Director Jersey Jermier 
has also drawn criticism, 



especially for his "no comment" 
stand, although Jermier clarified 
his stand somewhat at Friday's 
1AC meeting. 

"I've had several insinuations 
that no comment means admission 
of guilt and I will guarantee you 

No cheers 
from the pressbox 

that that is exactly what it does not 
mean." Jermier said. 

"1 think that Jersey Jermier has 
been victimized by many, due to 
these regrettable happennings," 
Hartman said, "and certainly it 
has made his job extremely dif- 
ficult." 

AND WHAT effect has the bad 

publicity had on contributions from 
alumni? Larry Weigel, assistant 
director of endowment and 
development, said that he has 
gotten some interesting feedback 
from alumni recently. 

"Judging from our day to day 
receipts a lot of our large family of 
contributors that have given for a 
number of years, they continue to 
support the University," Weigel 
said. "It would be hard to draw a 
conclusion that giving is down. 

"I think the different individuals 
who may have been upset by any 
bad publicity, well a lot of times 
these people will give gain," 
Weigel said. 

Hartman said "concern" was the 
best way to describe the feedback 
he has gotten from alumni. 

"Our alumni are concerned with 
the damage that the negative 
publicity has caused," Hartman 
said. "To what extent it has in- 



fluenced contributions, I don't 
know. 

"Quite frankly, I have great faith 
and confidence in our alumni and 
all the people within the University 
to regain any ground lost 

NOW FOR a few short shots while 
wondering which pro football team 
will draft Gary Spani today. I 
predict he'll wind up being be a 
Kansas City Chief or a 
Philadelphia Eagle. 

K-State hasn't provided the 
fanfare that the University of 
Kansas has in signing its 
basketball recruits. Assistant 
basketball coach Jim Eads says 
that's because playing for K-State 
creates enough pressure without 
giving a player a reputation he 
can't live up to. 

Eads said that two of the players 
KU recruited on its whirlwind jet 
tour weren't recruited by the top 
schools in their home area. Mark 
Snow, 6-10 center from San Diego, 
wasn't recruited by UCLA or any 
of the top schools in the PAC-8 and 
David Magley, 6-7 forward from 
South Bend, Indiana wasn't 
recruited by Indiana University, 
Eads said. 



SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 
Royal Prestige Needs 

Students to Supplement 
Summer Work Force 

s 200 per week 

For further info come to: 

K-State Union 204 

Wed., May 3-11:30, 1:30, 3:30 



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12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tu».,Miy 2,1978 



Senate may originate council 
to rally for off-campus views 



The possibility of forming a 
Student Governing Association 
(SGA) council to represent 
students living off -campus is being 
studied by a commission sponsored 
by K-State Student Body President 
Sam Brownback. 

The commission, which had its 



first meeting April Id, is resear- 
ching off-campus programs at 
other universities and will attempt 
to determine the feasibility of such 
a program at K-State, Brownback 
said. 

"They're trying to get a grasp of 
the thing right now," Brownback 
said. 



Independent students 
to have town meetings 



Six town meetings for off- 
campus students are being planned 
by Student Senate Com- 
munications Committee for fall 
semester, according to Mary 
Faubion, committee chairman. 

Town meetings are being 
organized to provide a sounding 
board for the problems off-campus 
students face, Faubion said. 

No meetings are scheduled for 
the remainder of this semester 
because student interest in a 
meeting will be low at this time, 
Faubion said. 

"Our reason (for not scheduling 
one now) is it is so close to finals. 
We fee) that more people will be 
concerned about off -campus things 

Pearson predicts 
debate on SALT 

WICHITA (AP)-U.S. and Soviet 
negotiators should reach 
agreement on the Strategic Arms 
Limitation Talks by late summer 
or early fall, but the treaty will 
face a tough debate in the Senate, 
Sen. James Pearson predicted 
Monday. 

The Kansas Republican, who 
returned last Thursday from 
Geneva where he is a member of 
the U.S. negotiating team, said a 
number of issues remain 
unresolved, including verification 
procedures for treaty compliance 
and classification of a new Soviet 
bomber. 

Whether the treaty will be as 
controversial as the Panama Canal 
treaties will depend on what 
legislation confronts the Senate 
when SALT comes up for con- 
sideration and how much of a 
political issue it becomes in the 
1978 elections, Pearson said. 

"I think without a doubt treaty 
ratification will be long and ex- 
tended," he told students at 
Wichita State University, where he 
delivered the Eisenhower Lecture. 
"It will be a very long and very 
tough debate." 

He predicted the treaty would 
not come up for consideration until 
sometime next year. 

Pearson said the Soviets want 
the treaty badly, noting that they 
are under pressure to reduce arms 
spending and that Soviet President 
Leonid Brezhnev has a personal 
commitment to its success. 



PINBALL 
CONTEST 

Prizes for the three 

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ends May 15 

THE 
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1123 Moro— Aggie ville 



next fall when they move into their 
apartments," Faubion said. 

Only one town meeting was held 
last semester, and few off -campus 
students attended. Faubion said 
more advertising should increase 
the turn-out. 

"We want to have a central 
location for the meetings," 
Faubion said. She said a central 
location would be easier to 
saturate with advertising as well 
as making it easier for students to 
attend. 

The topics for the meetings 
haven't been decided yet, Faubion 
said. 

"We are studying what the 
problems are, what the renters are 
concerned about," she said. 

The committee is going to try to 
have some professionals, for 
example, lawyers, attend each 
meeting to inform students of their 
rights and how to handle com- 
plaints, she said. 

i i — m 



BROWNBACK SAID the com 

mission was formed to study a way 
to give off -campus students better 
representation on campus because 
they are not represented well, 
although they comprise over half 
of the student population. 

"We've got AKH (Association of 
Residence Halls) that represents 
the residence halls and the people 
there, and Panhellenic that 
represents the sororities and IFC 
(Interfraternity Council) that 
represents the fraternities and 
(these groups) make sure as to 
protect their interests," Brown- 
back said. 

"Yet our largest group of 
students on campus, perse, the off- 
cam pus group has no 
real. ..watchdog for their in- 
terests," he said. 

Kirk Johnson, off-campus and 
married student director for 
Brownback's cabinet, said he 
hopes to have the council organized 
sometime during the fall semester. 

"Right now we're doing a 
feasibility study and we're looking 
at the steps that need to be taken 
for getting the council at K-State," 
Johnson said. 

"Our ultimate goal is to get more 
input from off-campus and 
married students in student 
government. They just don't have 
the representation in student 
government that they should," he 
said. 

Johnson said students with 
suggestions or who wish to help 
with the formation of the council 
may contact him through the SGA 
office. 



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CLIMB THE LETTERS TO SUCCESS. 



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J 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. TiM.,M>y2,1S78 



13 



Beauty today, cancerous tomorrow? 



By SHARON KALE 
Collegian Reporter 

Her alarm goes off at 7:30 a.m. 
It's time to get ready for another 
day. She gets up, shampoos and 
conditions her hair. Then she 
applies the special blow-dry 
conditioner. 

After her hair is dried, she turns 
on her make-up mirror to it's day- 
light setting. Slowly, carefully, she 
applies her eye shadow and 
mascara . She touches up her finger 
nail polish. 

A touch of foundation here and 
there to cover up the flaws, some 
blusher to give her a natural, 
healthy glow and she's ready to go. 

* ' I use cosmet ics because I do not 
have the features to go without 
them," Rene Netherton, junior in 
social work said. 

"Maybe if I never started using 
them I could accept myself without 
them, but I think I need 
cosmetics," she said. 

"The only cosmetics I use are 
eye make-up and finger nail 
polish," Martha Armstrong, 

freshman in anthropology said. "I 
use cosmetics to accent my eyes. " 

MILLIONS of dollars are spent 
each year on cosmetics. However, 
health also pays for this cosmetic 
beauty, sometimes. 

Last October, the National 
Cancer Institute released findings 
from a study it conducted to show 
that an ingredient in hair dye 
causes cancer. 

Dr. Earle Brauer, Vice 
President of Medical Affairs at 
Rev Ion, said he does not think the 
study was done realistically. 

"The study was part of an 
overall program to screen a 
multitude of commercial 
chemicals. All kinds of chemicals 
were involved, not just cosmetics," 
-Brauer said. 

"The National Cancer Institute 
has always said the way to conduct 
these studies is to use the product 
in a way duplicating human use. 

"This study was done by feeding 
huge quantities of chemical sub- 
stances to rodents," Brauer said. 

THE INGREDIENT involved is 
24 diaminoanisole. 

"The study could be reliable but 
one must not draw conclusions 
from it," Brauer said. He ex- 
plained the test results show huge 
quantities of 24 diaminoamisole fed 
to rats do cause cancer. However it 
does not necessarily follow that 
hair dye causes cancer when used 
as it should be used. 

"Is it reasonable to assume 
because huge quantities are fed to 
mice that use on hair causes 
cancer?" Brauer said. 

A study by Dr. Bruce Ames, 
biochemist from the University of 
California, has shown chemicals 
from hair dye can be found in the 
urine of users, indicating that in 
small quantities, the chemicals are 
absorbed through the scalp. 

"This is the reason why the FDA 
(Food and Drug Administration) 
has proposed a warning, because 
it can penetrate the skin." Moemil 
Corwin, spokesman for the FDA 
said. 



'Until they prove that the chemicals 
in small doses are a detriment to my health, 
i won't stop using it.' 




Rene Netherton said the recent 
controversy about hair dye does 
not worry her. 

"I don't believe it. Until they 
prove that the chemicals in small 
doses are a detriment to my health, 
I won't stop usng it," she said. 

"I do believe that they ought to 
put a warning on boxes saying it 
does show up in the urine of users, 
but that this does not necessarily 
mean it's cancer causing," 
Netherton said. 

WHILE THE dangers of hair dye 
are still controversial, it is already 
known there are many dangers 
involved with the use of eye make- 
up, especially mascara. 

"Mascara can cause irritations 
because it is easily contaminated 
by the way it is applied and the 
growth of bacteria," Corwin said. 

Brauer emphasized that while 
mascara can cause irritations, it is 
rare. 

"There are not a lot of 
irritations. There are literally 
millions of applications of mascara 
daily. There is an insignificant 
number of adverse affects," 
Brauer said. 

"These adverse affects fall into 
two categories. First, it is possible 
to have an allergic reaction to an 
ingredient. This is the largest 
segment of the small amount of 
adverse reactions. 

"The balance is because of 
contaminated mascara. This is 
caused primarily by the user 
contaminating the product," 
Brauer said. 

Ways to contaminate mascara 
include wiping the applicator with 
a dirty facial tissue or applying it 
to an infected eye. 

"Some even, if you can believe it, 
moisten the wand with saliva," 
Brauer said. 

"Mascara made by reputable 
companies counteract con- 



tamination with preservatives. I 
think there is a need for stronger or 
better preservatives in companies 
not policing their own product," 
Brauer said. 

"All eye make-ups can cause the 
same problem if used carelessly," 
Brauer said. 

ANOTHER problem involved 
almost exclusively with mascara is 
the possibility of scratching the 
cornea with a contaminated 
mascara brush. This could cause 
permanent blindness according to 
Dr. Louis Wilson, professor of 
ophthalmology at Emory 
University Medical School in 
Atlanta. 

Some rules to follow to avoid 
infection risks are not to use 
mascara for longer than four 
months. Water-based mascaras 
should not be used this long. 
Mascara should not be worn if the 
eye is irritated. 

Students have had a variety of 
experiences with mascara use. 

"I used to have to go to a der- 
matologist because of the eye 
makeup I was using. I got a 
reaction with red bumps around 
my eyes. The dermatologist told 
me to quit using it for two weeks 
until it cleared up," Armstrong 
said. 

"The doctor told me not to use 
the same mascara for longer than 
two months," she said. "I had to 
buy hypo-allergenic products, and 
still do. The doctor said since I'd 
used this mascara for a month and 
a half that the ingredients might be 
contaminated and have caused the 
infection," Armstrong said. 



DENISE HUND, sophomore in 



May Day celebrations 
were a' labor' of love 



By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

Vandals desecrated Karl Marx's 
grave in London and demon- 
strators battled police in several 
West European countries as 
workers around the world marched 
and rallied Monday in observance 
of May Day, the international labor 
holiday. 

In Moscow, Soviet President 
ieonid Brezhnev basked in ac- 
colades in the Red Square while 
Spain mared its biggest May 1 ever 
and Britain its first officially 
recocnized May Day holiday. 

IN PARIS, leftist demonstrators 



at the Place de la Bastille, symbol 
of the French Revolution, stoned 
police before 1,500 of them broke 
away through nearby streets on a 
rampage of car-burning and 
window -smashing. Police fired 
tear gas, tore down makeshift 
barricades and arrested several 
young demonstrators. Six 
policemen and a dozen leftists 
were hurt. 

In Milan. Italy, leftists at an 
outdoor rally hurled bricks at a bus 
filled with sympathizers of the 
ruling Christian Democratic 
Party, injuring three persons. 



Photo* oy Tom Bell 



social work, said she has never had 
any major problems with 
mascara. 

"Sometimes when I'm putting it 
on I get it in my eye and it'll get red 
and hurt. But if I wash it out with 
water right away, it will stop 
hurting." 

"I've never had an irritation for 
an extended period of time," Hund 
said. 

The FDA intends to propose a 
regulation that mascara and other 
eye cosmetics have sufficient 
preservatives to last through 
storage and to withstand con- 
tamination under ordinary con- 
ditions of use, Corwin said. 



While the problem with mascara 
is often in how it is applied, a 
problem with many nail hardeners 
is a result of an ingredient. 

The FDA has received com- 
plaints about hardneners con- 
taining formaldahyde. 

"It even gets to the point of the 
nail coming lose," Wayne Stevens, 
chemist for the FDA said. 

"Formaldahyde is used at about 
five percent on down in some nail 
hardeners," Stevens said. 

"We have allowed these har- 
deners to be marketed as long as 
the level is five percent or less, and 
some have warning labels," he 
said. 

"Recently the FDA took action 
against one hardener that had 
more than five percent for- 
maldahyde. It's still on the 
market , ' ' Stevens said . 

BRAUER claims that no 
reputable U.S. companies 
manufacture any nail hardeners 
with formaldahyde. 

Listed on the label of one well- 
known nail hardener is 
toluenesulfonamide formaldahyde 
resin. 

Roshantha Chandraratna, 
assistant instructor of chemistry, 
said this does not mean it contains 
formaldahyde. 

"What this probably means is 
that this is a polymer made using 
formaldahyde, but that it has no 
other properties of for- 
maldahyde," Chandraratna said. 

Some K-State students in- 
terviewed said they had noticed 
discoloring of nails from using 
finger nail polish. 

"Discoloring happens to me," 
Armstrong said. "My nails turn 
yellow if I wear dark color and 
don't take it off for awhile. They 
turn yellow for about a week and a 
half," 



HELP WANTED! 



CONSUMER RELATIONS 
BOARD DIRECTOR 



Qualifications: Knowledge of consumer 
problems, consumer protection agencies and 
arbitration proceedings. 

Responsibilities : Supervision of students 
enrolled in "Consumer Relations Prac- 
ticum," complaint handling and ad- 
ministrative duties. 



Applications and more information are available 
at the SGS office. Applications are due noon, Thurs., 
May 4. 

SGS is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 




14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tin., May 2, 1*71 



Court OKs reporting of 'secrets ' 



WASHINGTON (AP)-The 
Supreme Court ruled Monday that 
news reporters cannot be 
criminally punished for disclosing 
truthful accounts of secret 
governmental proceeedings to 
readers, viewers and listeners. 

Before recessing for two weeks, 



the Justices struck down a Virginia 
law that made it a crime to report 
state judicial commission's con- 
fidential inquiries about judges' 
fitness to hold office. 

Although most states cloak such 
investigations in secrecy, only 
Virginia and Hawaii made it a 
crime for someone not linked to the 



state commissions to break 
through that wall of con- 
fidentiality. 

LANDMARK Communications, 
publisher of the Virginian-Pilot 
newspaper in Norfolk, was in- 
dicted, convicted and fined $500 
after the newspaper ran an ac- 
curate report in 1975. The article 



Neither bears nor snow nor puppies: 
Explorer reaches North Pole alone 



TOKYO (AP) -Japanese ex 
plorer Naomi Uemura became the 
first person to reach the North Pole 
alone by dog sled Monday in a 500- 
mile, 57-day adventure delayed by 
a hungry polar bear, blizzards, ice 
floes and the pregnancy of one of 
his huskies. 

And the 37-year-old veteran 
adventurer isn't finished. Having 
completed just the first leg of a 
3,500-mile journey, Uemura is on 
his way to Greenland now and 
plans to travel the length of the big 
island. 

First word of the solo feat 
reached the Smithsonian 
Institution in Washington through 



an automatic beeper the explorer 
was carrying that sent a beam via 
Nimbus 6 satellite to Lee Houchins 
there. 

"The Smithsonian Institution in 
Washington contacted us to con- 
firm that Uemura reached the pole 
on May 1 at 0445 GMT ( 11 :45 a.m. 
CDT)," said Haruyuki Takahashi, 
spokesman for Uemura's financial 
backers. 

IT WAS the sixth overland 
conquest of the North Pole since 
Robert Peary's six-man expedition 
in 1909. The most recent was last 
Thursday when four students from 
Nihon University in Tokyo reached 
the pole. 



Stock market still climbing 

NEW YORK ( AP)— The stock market extended its spring rally to a 
new high for the year Monday, unabashed by rising interest rates and 
other adverse news. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials rose 7.01 to S44.33, stretching 
its gain since Feb. 28, when it hit a three-year low of 742.12, to more than 
100 points. 

The average's close was its highest since it finished at 844.42 last Nov. 
25. 

Trading remained active, with 37.02 million shares changing hands on 
the New York Stock Exchange against 32.85 million on Friday. 



Crossword By Eugene Sbeffer 



ACROSS 
1 Space 

module 
4 Leather 

moccasin 
7 Price 
11 "The Red" 

13 Chalice 

14 Sailor's 
term 

15 Festive 

16 The sun 

17 Confined 

18 Skier's run 
20 Military cap 
22 Wrath 

24 One who 

wagers 
28 Line under 

picture 

32 Prize money 

33 Girl's name 

34 Seize 
roughly 

38 Charge 
against 
property 

37 Mature 

39 Breastwork 
41 Crave 



43 Inform on 

44 Location 
48 More 

judicious 
50 Ago 
53 Smite 
55 Mr. 

Preminger 
H Turkish 

regiment 

57 Constellation 

58 Famous ship 

59 Secular 

60 Not gross 



81 Aries 
DOWN 

1 Limbs 

2 Epochal 

3 Venus of — 

4 Dance step 

5 Berserk 

6 Man in the 
Bible 

7 Conditional 
surrender 

8 Cheer for 
the matador 

9 Oriental coin 



solution tune: 24 mln. 




Answer to yesterday's puzzle. 



10 Asian feast 
12 Of a certain 

economic 

system 
19 Son of Gad 
21 Energy 
23 Eternity 
25 Stumble 
28 NT's Hosea 

27 Sign a lease 

28 Dressed 

29 Assistant 

30 Not minus 

31 Forty winks 
35 Legal 

profession 
38 Three: 

comb, form 
40 Untrained 
42 - Allen 
45 Ireland 

47 Mix 

48 Sicilian 
volcano 

49 Wander 

50 "- Joey" 

51 Wing 

52 Cebine 
monkey 

54 Make lace 



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Uemura started his 500-mile trip 
to the pole on March 5 from Cape 
Edward on Ellsmore Island in the 
Canadian Arctic. 

On the fourth day out, a polar 
bear attacked his tent and ate all 
the provisions. When the bear 
returned the next day, Uemura 
killed it and arranged for more 
provisions to be flown to him from 
Cape Edward. 

In the middle of the journey, one 
of his team of Eskimo huskies gave 
birth to six pups. Uemura was 
forced to delay his trip further so 
mother and pups could be flown 
back to the base camp. 

Once Uemura was trapped on a 
100-square-yard ice floe and had to 
wait for colder weather to 
reconnect to the ice cap. Blinding 
blizzards also hampered the ex- 
plorer's progress. 



said that the state's Judicial 
Inquiry and Review Commission 
had studied complaints against a 
local domestic relations judge, 
Warrington Sharp. 

"The article published by 
Landmark provided accurate 
factual information about a 
legislatively-authorized 
inquiry.. .and in so doing clearly 
served those interests in public 
scrutiny and discussion of 
governmental affairs which the 
First Amendment was adopted to 
protect," Chief Justice Warren 
Burger wrote for the court. 

IN ANOTHER development, the 
court set the stage for what may 
become another important free- 
press ruling when it agreed to 
decide how much discretion judges 
have in deciding when to keep 
reporters and the public out of 
usually public court proceedings. 

The justices voted to hear an 
appeal by the Gannett Co., Inc., 
news organization seeking to 
overturn a sweeping courtroom- 
access ruling by New York's 
highest court in a Rochester 
murder case. 

Using a tactic that has seen rapid 
growth since a 1976 Supreme Court 
ruling virtually outlawing 
reporting prohibitions on in- 
formation gathered in open court, 
a trial judge in that case merely 
ejected the public and news media 
from a pretrial hearing. 



Gannett s appeal gives the 
justices the chance to establish 
guidelines for judges who want to 
insure fair trials. The court's 
eventual decision, which won't 
come until next year, may tell all 
judges how to weigh free-press and 
open-court interests with the 
competing need for a fair trial. 

IN OTHER matters Monday, the 
court: 

—Decided, by a 6-3 vote, that 
municipal utilities cannot cut off 
service because of non-payment 
without first giving customers a 
chance to resolve the billing 
disputes. 

In an unprecedented ruling 
written by Justice Lewis Powell 
Jr., the court said utility customers 
have a constitutionally protected 
interest in receiving service 
because such service is "a 
necessity of modern life." 

—Ruled that former Green Beret 
doctor Jeffrey MacDonald must 
stand trial on charges of murder in 
the 1970 bludgeoning and stabbing 
deaths of his wife and two young 
children. 

—Rejected efforts by 60 House of 
Representatives members to 
scuttle the Panama Canal treaties 
ratified by the Senate earlier this 
month. 

—Left intact a decision barring 
baseball star Roberto Clemente's 
widow from collecting damages for 
her husband's 1972 air crash death. 



Collegian Classifieds 



CLASSIFIED RATES 

One day: 20 words or loss, $1 .50, 5 
cents per word over 20; Two day*: 
20 words or Iota, 82.00, 6 cants por 
word over 20; Thro* days: 20 words 
or tots, $2.25, 10 cants por word 
ovsr 20; Four days: 20 words or less, 
$2.75, 13 cents psr word ovsr 20; 
Flvs days: 20 words or loss, $3.00, 
1 5 cants psr word ovsr 20. 

Classified! are payable In advance unless 
client has an established account with Student 
Publications 

Deadline la 10 a.m. day before publication 10 
am Friday (or Monday paper. 



Items found ON CAMPUS can be advertised 
FREE tor a period not exceeding three days. 
They can be placed at Kedile 103 or by calling 
Ml MM. 



Display Classified Rates 

On* day: 12 00 per Inch; Three days $1.65 per 
Inch; Five deys: SI 80 per Inch; Ten days: It 60 
per inch. (Deadline la S p.m. 2 days before 

publication ) 



Classified advertising It available only to 
those who do nol discriminate on Ihe basis of 
race, color, religion, national origin, sex or an- 
cestry 



CAMPER: S fool Spacakrslt truck camper with 
s love, ice box, water tank, and gas bottle. 537* 
8020after5:»p.m. (143-147) 

1S71 HACIENDA mobile home. Furnished In- 
cludes washer, dryer and air conditioner. Ex- 
cellent condition Reasonably priced 
Available after final week 537-6240. (147-151) 



SCUBA DIVING tank (71.2) regulator, must sell, 
S110. Call 53*8211. room 630, ask for Tim. If 

nol In, leave message. (147-149) 



FOR SALE 



TANDY LEATHER kits, supplies, custom leather 
work. Special orders welcome. Black powder 
guns, accessories, supplies, equipment. Case 
knives, frontier, western accessories. Old 
Town Leather Shop Old Town Mall (BOtt) 

COINS, STAMPS, military relict, antiques, guns 
swords, paper. Americana, advertising 
memorabilia Buy, sell, trade. Treasure Chest, 
Old Town Mai i (8011) 

BUT SELL Trade — records . tepee, coins, books, 
COfnlca. Playboys, other magazines 
Costumes available to rent. Treasure Chest. 
Aggie vii la I SOU) 

NEW— WE have ■ single element electric 
typewriter with four dlflerenl pitches— elite, 
plea, proportional end mlcroetlte. Hull 
Business Machines. 1212 Moro. Agglevtlte 

limn 

USED VW pant-beetle and tailback, 
aquarebeck perla up to 1971. Body end 
mechanical Call 1-494-2388 J4L Bug Service 
(133M) 

POSTERS, TAPESTRIES, used records, 
Playboys, paper -back books, comics. Beam 
oolites, beer treys, glasses and mugs 
Treesure Chest. Aggievllle (134147) 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS programmable 
calculators All models In stock at low 
discount prices One year tec lory warranty. Ti 
56/59 solid state software and TI 59 pattellas 
In stock Programming at si stance available. 
L (137 158) 



12*60 Eequlre, with nice arrangement, two 
bedrooma, lully carpeted, furnished, centre! 
air and heat, overhead/lie downs, 10x10 shed, 
77*7092 1140-149) 

SUN HANG glider- Ilka new. Will give lessons. 
Cell after 5 00 pm 1-456-2528.(141 ISO) 

19(3 FLEETWOOD, 10*60 two bedroom, par 
daily furnished with elr conditioning, available 
■Iter finals, 12900. 776-3947 after 5:00. (143- 
147) 



1975 HONDA CVCC automatic, 24,000 miles. 
Super clean. 12,600 or best offer. 537-0349 
(147-150) 

TRIUMPH TR4A, 1967, mutt tell. • classic spor- 
ts car with spoke wheels, new lop and metal tc 
blue paint, looks good, runs great, 11500 or 
beat oiler See al northwest corner 3rd and 
Btusmont or 5396965 (143-147) 

USED GIBSON Les Paul Custom. See at Strings 
n Things, 614 N. 12th. Aggievllla, 539-2009. 
(144-150) 

14'xiO' SCHULT mobile home, 1972. Two 
bedrooms. Includes: fumllure, washer, dryer, 
sliding glass door, kitchen bay window, storm 
windows, double insulation Call 539-9305 al 
ter 600 p.m. (144-150) 

FIVE STENOHETTE dictating machines, One 
portable slenorette, miscellaneous ac- 
cessories. Sell to the highest bidder Bids 
close May 6, 1976. Can be seen at Student 
Financial Ass is lance, F si re hi id Hell, Room 
104, HSU Call 532-6420 (144-149) 

1972 YAMAHA 650x52, 1500 miles on overhaul. 
Runs excellent Good condition, must tell, 
1695 Call 537-6341 (144-148) 

8x43 MOBILE home, skirted, washer, shed, on 
lot. good condition, 11800— Call between 
4: 306:00 p.m.- 7764476 (144-1 48) 

1970 VOLKSWAGEN Bug Good mechanical 
condition. Good gas mileage. Dependable. 
AM-FM 9 track. Call evenings 537-4335. (144 
1«) 

1972 CORVETTE Good condition, one owner 
$5,200 Tuttle Creek Trailer Ct. 938 537-9410 
(145-151) 

1989 NOVA two door, 307, excellent shape, runs 
greet, new tires 1895 or best offer Call bet- 
ween 5:30-7:30 p.m. 539-1683 (145149) 

12x80 MOBILE home, lully carpeted, en cap! for 
kitchen, central sir and heeling 913-494-2315, 
Walnul Grove Trailer Park. (145-155) 

10x44 STAR mobile home. Two-bedroom, fur- 
nished, will consider contract. 52200 or beet 
reasonable oiler Cell 532-5731 before 500 

p.m. (146-150) 

BASF (PERFORMANCE), Scotch (Master) and 
Memorex (Mr OX2) cassettes lor recording 
S2.45 for C 90 Call Dick, Room 214, 53*5301 
(14*150) 

MARANTZ RECEIVER Model 22208 20 watts, 
tour yeer* (eft on warranty BIC Formula 2 
speakers 15-75 watte. Six year* left on warren 
ty. Call Randy. 53*8211. Room 525. (147-150) 



SUBLEASE 

SUMMER TWO bedroom luxury apartment 
Close to campusSAggievllle Dishwasher, gar 
baga disposal, laundry facilities, balcony. 
Rent negotiable 537 2194 (13*148) 

SPACIOUS TWO bedroom apartment lor sum- 
mer — furnished, Sir, balcony, off-street 
perking, one block from Aheern, rent 
negotiable Cell 5323831 (14*149) 

FOR SUMMER: Two bedroom lu mi shed luxury 
apartment, close to campus, central sir, dish 
washer, laundry facilities. No pets Call 537- 
1216(14*149) 



FOR JUNE and July, one bedroom good lor two, 
6100. Two bedroom good for three. SI 50. Four 
bedroom. S200. Near campus. Call 537-0428. 
(142-151) 

HEY) SUMMER: 1V. bedroom, accommodate - 
two-three people easily, great location near 
campus, shag, cable, air conditioning, 
negotiable Call 532-3787 (143-147) 

SUMMER— ONE bedroom apartment across 
from campus Two or three people. Dish- 
washer, air conditioned, balcony. Call 776 
4329 after 5:00 put. (1 43-147) 

SUMMER: 1 Vi bedroom. Ah- conditioned. Close 
to campus 1212 Thurston 537 2282 (143-147) 

MAY 20-July 31. Furnished two bedroom apart 
menl, central sir. three beds, dishwasher, 
laundry facilities, reserved parking, close 
campus/Agglevllle. 53*7854 (143-147) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT VI. across from Abeam 
One bedroom, central sir, turn i shed, carpeted, 
laundry Early occupancy available Only SI 20 
monthly, 77*0984. (143-147) 

SUMMER: EXTRA large luxury one bedroom 
apartment. Close to campus and Aggievllle. 
Balcony, shag, central air. Rent negotiable. 
Call 537-4989 (144 148) 

HOUSE: FOUR bedroom, two baths, dish- 
washer, carpeted, lots of windows, one block 
to campus, very nice. SSOOrmonth, 537-7213. 
(144-148) 

f URNISHED AND carpeted apartment. Good for 
one-three people. Convenient location. Call 
77*3468, rent negotiable. (144-146) 

HOUSE: TWO bedroom, remodeled house. 
Three blocks from campus. Some furniture. 
Off-street parking S2O0 plus utilities. Call 776 
3792 or 776-6890. (144 148) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT #4, across Irom Aheern 
Nice one bedroom, furnished apartment, alt 
conditioning, two balconies. $130Jmonth Call 
77*0202. (144-148) 

SUMMER— SMALL one bedroom furnished 
apartment, air conditioned, excellent location, 
SllWmonlh, all utilities paid 537-7593. (144- 
148) 

JUNE-JULY: furnished two-bedroom apartment 
(or three on North Manhattan Avenue. Air con- 
ditioned, carpeted Call Tammy 435, Putnam 
Hall (144-148) 

MONT BLUE duplex with all conveniences for 
summer Two bedrooms, two baths, central 
air. close to campus. Negotiable. 537-8058. 
(144-148) 

ENO MAY July 31. Wildcat Inn, Jr , One 10 three 
persons. AcroasfAhearn Carpeted, t unvaried, 
air conditioned, laundry S120 monthly 537 
0252(144-148) 

WILDCAT VI— early and late occupancy, across 
from fteldhouse, one bedroom apart menl, fur- 
nished, central alt, laundry. $130 537-2342 
(14*149) 

TWO BEDROOM apartment, furnished, elr con- 
ditioned, all electric, dishwasher, hall block 
from campus on Cfaflln, two-three persons, 

$120 monthly Call 776-1147 (145-149) 

SUMMER— SUBLEASE luxury two bedroom 
apartment. For Information call 7767161 (147 
150) 

CALL 778-5353. apartment tor one or two, air 
conditioned, good location, rant negotiate m 
c heck 1 h Is o ne o ut ! ( i * 7 1 49) eat 

WE'RE DESPERATE: price negotiable lot two 
bedroom apartment Air conditioned, dish- 
washer. Great location. Will listen toany offer 
537-8555 (147149) 

(Continued on page 15) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Ti*„ May 2, t«7* 



15 



(Continued from paga 1 4) 

SUMMER: LUXURY two bedroom apartment 
wHh dlshwssher, central sir, carpeting, and 
balcony. Acres* from Goodnow Hall, 
tlSOrrrtonlh. Call 5374722. (140-140) 

COOL TWO bedroom furnished basemenl apart- 
ment tot tho*e hot month*. Lundln Apart 
mania, ona block wait ol campu* Price 
negotiable. 7704304. (145-149) 

SUMMER: MONT Blua two bedroom, luxury 
apartment Air conditioning, laundry facilities 
Reduced summer rata*. Call John, 132 Marian 
Hall 5304301. (145-147) 

MUST SUBLEASE -Jorx. and Juty-lumlahed 
Mont Blua apartmanl Air conditioning, car 
pat. close to campus. Price negotiable 537- 
2878 or 77OO02t (145-140) 

SUMMER, LARGE three bedroom lumlehed 
apartment, comfortable lor tour, half block 
from camput, vary low utllittet, 1100 month. 
537-7073. (145-147) 

LARGE THREE bedroom apartment • 

0265/month or *) t75rmoflth per room. All 
utilities paid, I urn I shed two wslerbede, 
acraan porch. 778-3388 (140-150) 

EXTRA NICE! Two bedroom apartment oti of 
Kimbeii, eatt of CrCO Park May 22 July 31. 
Call 537-0020. rant negotiable (140-140) 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom, carpeted apartmanl 

Central air. dlahwaeher. Close to camput. 
cable TV Included, negotiable, aval labia May 
22,537-0704.(140-150) 

LARGE ONE bedroom apartment, »lr con 
dl Honed, turn lined With dtthwaaher Two 10 
three people 1010 Manhattan Ave Rani (150. 
catl 532-3297 (140-150) 

ONE BEDROOM furnished, ona block from cam 
put f 100 monthly June and July. All utllittet 
paid 7780010 or 776-7570. (147-140) 

FOR SUMMER, three bedroom nous*, cheap 
enough lor two people, large kitchen, good 
location next to creak. Calf Pratt, 537-0317 
(147-140) 

JUNE-JULY, two bedroom four-parson apart- 
manl. S50 each per month. UIIMIIa* paid, air 
conditioned, screened porch, cloee to cam 

put Call Mrs. Lengham. 530-3934 (147-150) 

ONE BEDROOM -Laawood Apartments 1037 
College HetQhie, furnished, air conditioned, 
halt block trom camput, June i-July 31, 
couple or two tingles tUSMonth plu* elec- 
tricity. Call Oavld. 770-1304 Or Debbie, 770- 
1500.(147-151) 



LOST 

LOST MONTHS aoo— key* on email round ring. 
Include! dorm, car and several others. Call 
530-3511 Pam (1001(140-147) 

AT WEST Stadium— Kaya and key ring Can 539. 
5413.(147-140) 

~PERSONAL 

THE TWELFTH commandment— Thou the It not 
provoke a nln|a to anger. SW. (1 43-147) 

PZ., BE your charming, personable, admirable 
self In Tope**. Take your pin along. Love. 
Hahner Lis & Ger (147) 

ALPHA PHI Omega Service Fraternity Spring 
Pledge Clast: For the |oyt, for the hassle*, for 
the laughs, tor the cooperation, for the 
crazlnesa. Thinks, Ron Kite, Pledgemaater. 
(H7) 

CHICKEN DOCTOR— A part of ma will alway* 
love you but time grow* short and thlt It 
farewell. For all that can never be said between 
us— Good luck, God bless, and take care. 
Honey. (147) 

joev. YOU are a wild and crazy guv »nd you 
ought to be In pictures Thank* • bunch. l_H. 

(1*7) 

TO MY m*n. Rick. Thank you becau** you are 
the belt, and especially because we've only 
lust begun. Your Babe. (147) 

EEC: GOOD luck on the CPAt I know you'll do 
your bet I. Love, DKT (147) 

R & A. You're welcome. D.B. ft, B.B. 

WANTED 

TO BUY: Playboy*, Ptayglrls, Penthouse, Oul, 
Gallery and others. Comics, paperback*, 
coin*, si amp*, mllltarla, antique*. Treasure 
Cheat. Aggievllie— Old Town Mall. (129-155) 

TYPING WANTED. Highest quality work; editing 
optional: extra-large type available if wanted 
for speeches, visually impaired. 530-4070, 
5:00*00 p.m. (142-149) 



MOVING TO CMHomta. need someone to drt** 
U Haul truck CBN 537-04B0 alter 7:00 p.m. 
(1401*0) 

RIDE NEEOED to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania Will 
share driving and gea: leaving final weak. Call 
John, 5300023 (140-190) 



SERVICES 



TO BUY; old, cheap, photo 
1221 (147-151) 



eniarger. Call 770- 



NOTICES 



MANHATTAN PAWN Shop. 317 S. 4th Street, 
rro-0112-atereoa, 0-tracka, TV*, 
typewriters, guitars, camera* Buy-sell-trade. 
(2tf) 

CUSTOM MADE U kt gold wedding bands Win 
dlln Jewelry , 230 U 3rd. Manhattan. (1 101 f) 

STEREO REPAIR -fast, reason able competent 
repair ot moat brands. Over 300 replacement 
needles in stock The Circuit Shop, through 
the Record Store 778-1221. (12111) 

ALVARE2 GUITARS otters you a saving ol 
000.08 on accessories *nd services whan you 
purchase one of their fine acoustics. Your 
local dealer la Strings n Thing*. 014 N. 12th, 
AeoievUte. 530-2000. (144-150) 

FROZEN YOGURT on tap at Deity* Daughter, a 
natural looda restaurant Mad* only with pure 
wholetom* ingredients 300 N. 3rd. Open 
M on Sat 1 1 00-0:00 7704207 (145-140) 

GIVE YOUR car a break I Why lug everything 
home for the summer when you can store all 
your valuables with us until you return In the 
fall. 118 the «r»t month. 1 7 50 each month 
thereailer Store with friend* and pay only 
pennies, tine* the above rat* It based on 1000 
pounds. Call Diana at Hart Transfer and 
Storage, 7700033 lor details From Hart ot 
America to Anywhere In the World. (147) 

K -STATE FLYING club member* 1 1 May 2 
meeting hat been changed 10 busy buslnett 
agenda This will be the leal meeting of the 
school year. It tt Important thai all club mem 
bars attend!! Time: 7:00 p.m. Place: Weber 
230. Date: May 2. Outcome of Ihls meeting will 
affect you! I (140-147) 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

SUMMER/FALL, lemelee to snare large fur- 
nlahad houee, prtvste bedrooms, more. ISO 
and up. Moat bills paid 1000 Vattler and 1122 
VattMr. 830-0401. (121-100) 

AVAILABLE MAY 1 til fall semester. 070 plus ap- 
proximately SO utilities. Own bedroom, fur- 
nished, non-smoker. Cloee. Call Patty, 530- 

3156 (138-147) 

FEMALE TO snare comfortable furnished apart- 
manl. One gal to join two other*. Private 
room. *lr conditioning, 090, utilities paid. Call 
530-2083 or T70O710. (140-140) 

ONE FEMALE lo join three others In spacious 
apartment, main floor of large home, tor sum- 
mer. Close 10 campus. 175, utilities paid. Call 
530-2003 or 53M320. (140-149) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share Wildcat inn spar 
(men! lor summer Call Pam, 7784400. (140- 
150) 

FEMALE TO share nice, furnished apartment tor 
summer with Iwo girls. Two blocks from cam- 
put. $87 plus aleclrlclly. Call 532-5384. (143- 
147) 



FALL TWO females needed to share two 
bedroom, Iwo bath, furnished duplex with Iwo 
others. ISOVmonth includes utilities. Close lo 
camput. Call 770-7339. (145-140) 

LIBERAL ROOMMATE wanted. Close to cam- 
pus, Aggievllie. and park. Utilities 
paid-tiOO/month. 770-7191. (145-148) 

LOOKING FOR one or two roommates for sum- 
mer. Private bedroom, use of swimming pool. 
Call 537-8033.(145149) 

PERSON WANTED to share two-bedroom 
mobile home, private bedroom, washer and 
dryer. Fall and spring Rent f 100 and half 
utilities. Marvin 537-7941. (147-151) 

MALE ROOMMATE needed tor I hi* summer lo 
Share luxury apartment. Approximately 0100 
with utilities. 53701 25 (1 47-150) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to Share luxury 
two bedroom apartment for summer For In 
formsllon call 770-7181 after 5:00 p.m. (147- 
151) 

ONE FEMALE to share furnished one bedroom 
apartment May 20lh August 20th, $55/monlh 
plus utilities, 1054 Claflln 05, 537-7004. (147) 

MALE/FEMALE vegetarian* preferred, but con- 
aider all mellow and liberal persona. Close 10 
campus, park. Summer/tall alter 400 p.m. Tad, 
537 2305. (147-151) 



RESUMES TYPESET, designed and printed by 
professionals gel results 100 Imprest tons- 
il 7 The Off sal Prate prints anything 770- 
4889 317 Houtton (2311) 



SOUPENE'S 
COMPUTER 
ALIGNMENT 



114 SdUth 5th 



776-8054 



RESUMES WRITTEN from acratch by 
professional writers. Your return* I* written, 
designed, typeset, printed 100 coplee/S29 
537-7000.(130-155) 



ATTENTION 



KATER'S DRIVING School liking applications 
now. For Information call Key Inc., Manhattan, 
KS, 5374330. (100-155) 



PIANO INSTRUCTION 

Now is the time to schedule piano 
lessons with Kurt Werner. Mr. 
Werner is a graduate of KSU and 
the Manhattan School of Music 
NYC. He has studied with 
Margaret Walker, Charles Strat- 
um, Robert Goldsand and Jeanne 
Dowis. Phone 537^924. 



HELP WANTED 

OVERSEAS JOBS— Summer/year round. 
Europe, S America. Australia, Asia, etc. Atl 
fields, 050041200 monthly, expenses paid, 
sightseeing. Free information. Write: BMP 
CO., BOX 4400. Dept. KB, Berkeley, CA 04704 
(120-147) 

drummer tor rock group. Steady work after June 
IS. Serious Inquiries only. Call Randy, 537- 
773S after 5:00 p.m. (143-147) 

WAITRESSES OR welters and bartenders. Call 
539-9753 attar 1 200 noon. (143-190) 

BARTENDER PART time, evenings, Bockers II, 
Ramada Inn. Apply In person at Office 525. 
(144-148) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT, require hard working 
students Involves bookkeeping, marketing, 
and Inventory No experience necessary, 
willing to relocate. 537-0014, after 500 p.m. 
(144-153) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT-end May through 
September— uuekfcomblne driver* needed 
for custom harvesting Contact Steve 
Schneider, 013430-7225, Lincoln. KS 87455. 
(145-155) 

LPN'S-RN'S 

3:00p.m.-ll:00p.m 

ll:00-7:00a.m. 

shifts 

Full and Part-time 

Positions Available 

Generous Salaries 

Apply in person 

College Hill Skilled 
Nursing Center 

2423 Kimball 
Equal Opportunity Employer 

DORM SUPERVISOR tor K.S.U. Upward Bound 
Program. 7 week program (June 5-July 21). 
laoo/week. room and board provided 
Qualifications: minimum of bach* lor' t 
degree. Send letter of application to: Tom 
Laatlter, Director, Upward Bound Program. 
Kan*** Slate University, FelrchlM 212, 
Manhattan. KS 08506. 532-0440 Application 
deadline: May 15. 1978. Kansas Stale Univer- 
sity is an Equal Opportunity; Affirm stive Ac- 
tion Employer. (145-147) 

WORK-STUDY secretary for SOA. General office 
work, good lyplst. Notary public preferred, or 
be willing to obtain a notary public com 
mission trom the Slate of Kansas. Average 20 
hours/week Minimum wage. SGA is an equal 
opportunity employer. (990). (140-148) 



1 AM looking tor underg r aduate Social Selene* 
major* tor an superlrrtent on Iteming You will 
be paid 13.00 for 1 Vt hours lime Pleeee con- 
tact Merval Roae at 5300770 Or com* to 
Denrson Hall 218, May 1st trom 7.300:30 p.m. 
and May 2nd trom I 305:30 p m. (140-147) 



The Dairy Queen 
at 1015 N. 3rd 

is now accepting 

applications 

for full and 

part-time summer 

employment. 

Contact Mr. Fry 
at 776-4117 



SUMMER EMPLOYMENT-Swlmmlng and 
Springboard diving instructors are needed tor 
lb* KSU Community Physical Act Mile* 
Program. AN applicant* must have a current 
WS1 certificate end be enrolled full-time thie 
spring or summer Call 5324)242 afternoons 
(147-151) 



FOR RENT 

TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electric* and manual*; 
day, wet* or month. Buwellt, 511 Leaven 
worth, acroe* from poet office. Call 770 0100. 
(Ht) 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS; excellent selection 
Hull Bu sin ess Machine* ,1212 Mom, 530-7191 . 
Service most makes of typewriters. Also Vic- 
tor and Olivetti adder* (HI) 

ONE, TWO, three bedroom furnished, un- 
furnished apartments tor summerrtaH. 10 or 12 
month contracts. No pets. 8370300. (llOtf) 

Furaished/Unfurnished 
Apartments 

•At KSU 

• One to four bedrooms 

• Most bills paid 

Phone 539-8401 

NEW THREE bedroom apartments Un- 
furnished. tSOOfmonlh plua utllltle*. Air con- 
ditioning, carpel. 530-1002. (144.1 40) 

FOUR BEDROOM house, two story, on* block 
from campus. For six persons. $75 per person. 
Available June 1st. 5374640. (144-149) 

ATTRACTIVE HOME In excellent neighborhood. 
Four bedrooms, family room, Sir conditioning, 
carpeting, fenced yard, carport. 1325. 
Available May 15 tor tsmily or mature studen- 
ts. 5304202 (144-1 4B) 

PRIVATE ROOMS, efficiency *p*rtm*nt* 
available now and June first Close lo cam- 
put. 537-2344 or evening* 7705038. (144-148) 

TWO BEDROOM, partially furnished apartment. 
two block* trom camput. (225 monthly. Lease 
end deposit. 530-3072. (1 45-149) 



RAINTREE APT. 

2 bdrm furnished 
carpeted & draped 

close to campus 

dishwasher, no pets 

or children 

$300 per month 

Summer or Fall leases 

Call 537-4567 or 

539-1201 



JUNE-JULY: 1 Vi bedroom, furnished apartment. 
air conditioned, disposal, ahag carpel, three 
blocks from camput. Very reaaoneble. Call 
537-0505. (145-140) 

SUMMER'FALL-two bedroom, furnished, 
newly remodeled basemenl apartment with 
private entrance. Nice quiet afreet, close to 
camput, park and Aggievllie. 0196 plu* alec- 
lrlclly, 770-4180 (145-149) 



LARGE, NICE, furnished apartmant. Three 
mares. Private. Parking. U tte n na ti l*. Knotty 
pine wall* Large bedroom, single beds. For 

tall. 776-8807 (140-149) 



NOW LEASING luxury »1udlo 
block east of campu*. Available 
August 1. Mont Blue 
(144-140) 



Apartments 5304447. 



Low as $120 a Month 

Wildcat Inn Apts. 

For 

June and July 

Summer School 

Furnished- 
Air Conditioning 

WE HAVE 
LIMITED AVAILABILITY 

For More Information 
Call 



CELESTE 

539-5001 



PEANUTS 



by Charles Shultz 



NOW, THIS ANIMAL 1 
HAVE 6R0U6HT HERE 
T0PAVISCALLEPADQ6 



YOU'RE 
KlPPlNG. 1 








nit urai «] ritiuii 5rn*ciit ik 



I STILL TUlNK 

IT'S A SMALL (AQPfci 

MOOSE I 



$--z 



ALL RIGHT, 
you GUVS, 

cut rr mm 



Y MERE, 
MOOSIE, 
M0051E, 
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DOWNSTOWN 



by Tim Downs 



/excuse me... do 
/ twcarrt-the 
/ book tcjemty 

I CKEflrNE UfX3 
YTOGETADOTH7' 



Ji 





TtSoUTOFSTOOC 
MOU.BUTIFMXi 
MEED iT SADLY 
ENOUGH, X CAM 
ORDER fTRORMjU. 




■Sttf... DON YX 
VCrJOU) YOU FROfYl 
SOMEWHERE? 





TERRIFIC TWOflhree bedroom home, two 
blocks from University Carpet*, dlahwaeher, 
sir conditioning, drape*, two baths, parage, 
fireplace. Perfect tar email family. *276 a mon- 
th plus utlllllM. Call 5300009 alter 340 p.m. 
(148-150) 

PARKVIEW 

Student Housing 

Osage and 11th St. 

Near Campus 

Near Aggieville 

• furnished 

■ free parking 

• equipped kitchen 

• laundromat 

• $55 and up 

Reserve now for 
summer and fall 
Phone 537-4233 

LARGE APARTMENT available May 22, S143. 

Two bedrooms, full basement, central air, 
refrigerator, stove, carpeting. Prairie Glen 
Ccoperal iv* Town hou ses , 7 70-0875 . (1 40-1 90) 

FOR JUNE end J uty . near campu s , f urn lined, air 
conditioned, two bedroom, ItOWmonlh, plu* 
part utilities. Furnished, large, three bedroom, 
1200 bills paid. Furnished, large tour 
bedroom, S240. bills paid 530-4904. (147 155) 



SUMMER RENTALS 

ROYAL TOWERS 
44PTS. 

Two Bedrooms 
$135.00 a month 

Air Conditioning 

All Utilities Paid 

including Cable TV 

Contract June 1 —July 31 

$150.00 Deposit 

Call 53*8851 or 539-9510 

5:00 p.m.— 7:00 p.m. 



UNFURNISHED NEWLY decorated, fully car- 
peled, two-bedroom, basemenl epartmant. 
Walk to school. Range and refrigerator fur 
nlthed. Heat, water and trash paid. Room lor 
two. No pet*. 1210 monthly 5304)133 or 530- 
3005, evening*. |1 47-1501 

UNFURNISHED, TWO-BEDROOM duplex with 
basement Walking distance to campus 
Rang* and refrigerator furnished Heel, water, 
and trash p*ld. Room for three. No pets. 1270. 
5390 1 33 or 539-3085. evening*. (147-190) 



NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 
APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished k unfurnished 
from (165 

• FREE shuttle service 

to KSU 

• portion of utilities paid 

• adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

Phone 

539-2951 

or see at 

1413 Cambridge Place 



ONE BEDROOM basement apartment, fur- 
nished. Private entrance, air conditioned 
Three block* to campus. Ho pels, deposit. 
lesM. Inquire 023 Osage. (147-140) 

FOR SUMMER— tall, furnished, air conditioned, 
paneled, one and two bedroom apartment*. 
Reasonable terms. 530-4004. (147-155) 



It 



MMSAS STATE COtLEPIAH, Tim., M*y 2, 1978 



Kirkpatrick, Wegman win 
area engineering contest 

Mechanical engineering students from K -State placed first and third in 
the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) 1978 Regional 
Student Papers Conference Friday and Saturday at Washington 
University in St Louis, Mo. 

Papers were presented by 15 mechanical engineering students in the 
Missouri, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Kansas (MOAK) Conference. 

Kerring Kirkpatrick, senior in mechanical engineering, placed first 
with a paper on "A Crawler for Cerebral Palsy Children." 

Kirkpatrick won $100 and an expense-paid trip to San Francisco in 
December to compete in the national contest at the annual meeting of 
ASME. 

"Evaluation of a Forced Air Honeycomb Collector," by Elaine 
Wegman, senior in mechanical engineering, placed third, winning ISO. 

KIRKPATRICK said she worked with Kent Martens, senior in 
mechanical engineering, for several semesters testing the crawler, 
taking slides of the testing and drawing sketches of the crawler. 

"The project itself was an honors project," Kirkpatrick said "We just 
finished it up two weeks ago." 

Kirkpatrick said they are going to try to patent their crawler. 

Steve Clark, senior in mechanical engineering worked with Wegman 
on a solar energy project, according to Alley Duncan, professor in 
mechanical engineering 

Grocery bills seize 
bigger bite of budget 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

Americans trying to cope with worsening inflation have found litUe 
cause for celebration at the supermarket so far this year. An Associated 
Press marketbasket survey shows grocery bills went up almost five 
percent in the first third of 1978, although there are indications that the 
cost spiral may be easing. 

The AP drew up a random list of 15 commonly purchased food and 
nonfood items and checked the price on March 1, 1973 at one super- 
market in each of 13 cities. Prices have been rechecked on or about the 
start of each succeeding month. One item, chocolate chip cookies, was 
dropped from the list late last year when the manufacturer discontinued 
the package size used in the survey. 

The latest survey showed that the average 4.9 percent inrease in the 
marketbasket bill at the checklist stores for the first four months of 1978 
was lower than the 5.8 percent rise during the same period of 1977. But 
much of the 1977 boost was due to increases in the cost of one item- 
coffee. By contrast, the 1978 rise has been moderated by drops in the 
price of the brew. When coffee was removed from the totals, The AP 
survey showed that on an overall basis, the marketbasket bill at the 
checklist stores declined one-tenth of a percent during the first four 
months of 1977 and increased 7.3 percent during the same period of 1978. 

A LOOK at the results of the latest check shows that while prices 
continued to rise during April, the rate of increase was lower than it has 
been all year. On an overall basis, the marketbasket bill at the checklist 
stores at the end of April was half a percent higher than it was a month 
earlier. This compared with an increase of more than 1 percent in each 
of the first three months of the year. 

As they did in previous months, higher meat prices contributed to the 
boost in April. The AP survey showed that the price of a pound of 
chopped chuck went up at the checklist store in six cities and frank- 
furters increased in price in seven cities. 

Richard McDougal, president of the National Cattlemen's Association, 
said, however, that cattle prices— which have been going 
up— probably are "reaching some sort of plateau" and could level off 
soon, with retail prices dropping later on. 

NO ATTEMPT was made to weight the AP survey results according to 
population density or in terms of what percent of a family's actual 
grocery outlay each item represents. The AP did not try to compare 
actual prices from city to city— to say, for example, that eggs cost more 
one place than another. Comparisons were made only in terms of per- 
centages of increase or decrease— saying a particular item went up 10 
percent in one city and 6 percent in another. 

Items on the AP checklist were: chopped -chuck, creamy peanut 
butter, frozen orange juice concentrate, center cut pork chops, coffee, 
paper towels, laundry detergent, butter, Grade- A medium white eggs, 
fabric softener, tomato sauce, milk, frankfurters and granulated suflar. 



We've added 

ELECTRONIC 
PERMING 
system 

to our staff 



Introductory offer: 

$5.00 off regular sensor perm price 
through May. Appointment only. 



For more information call 
776-5651 or 776-6077 




Lords 'n Ladys 



210 Humboldt 



The CMNhk promise was always good. 
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Ihissle-lren auto service when you 
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TQPEKA, KS 66612 



EXCH 



K 



' / 




The hard way 

There are just about 
three ways to get from 
the top to the bottom of 
West Stadium— walk 
down, fall down or 
rappel down. From left, 
Elliot Gates, Mark 
Wolters, Phil Ryan and 
Terry Lynch of 
Haymaker Hall chose 
the latter Tuesday, 
practicing the art of the 
controlled fall. 

Photo by Dave Kaup 



Kansas State 



Collegian 



Wednesday 

May 3, 1978 

Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol 84 No. 148 



Chiefs open the door and Spani feels the draft 



By CHRIS WILLIAMS 
Editor 
Gary Spani, K-State's only 
consensus ail-American football 
player ever, was the Kansas City 
Chiefs' first choice in the third 
round of Tuesday's National 



Football League player draft. Earl 
Campbell of Texas, drafted by 
Houston, was the first player 
chosen in the annua) draft. 
Spani, a 6-2, 225-pound 
linebacker from Manhattan, was 
chosen after the Chiefs picked Art 



Still from Kentucky and Sylvester 
Hicks from Tennessee State. 

"I was hoping for a second-round 
(selection)," Spani said Tuesday 
afternoon. "I knew they were very 
interested. 

"But I knew I'd go in the third. If 



Commission to seek grant 
for community development 



By DAVE HUGHES 

City Editor 

and PERYN COM1NSKY 

Collegian Reporter 

By a unanimous vote last night, 
the Manhattan City Commission 
approved a motion to apply for $2 
million in federal grants for 
community development. 

The grant comes under the 
Congressionally-approved Small 
Cities Community Development 
Program. Cities with populations 
under 50,000 are eligible to apply. 
These funds will supplement 
Manhattan's Community 
Development Department budget 

According to Gary Stith, 



Manhattan city planner, the grant 
would be used to address the 
current needs of community 
development. 

The improvement of the quality 
and quantity of housing and neigh 
borhoods' physical environments 
were among the needs Stith 
outlined. 

Part of the grant would also be 
used to develop the southern ar- 
terial in Manhattan. 

COMMISSIONERS reacted 
favorably to the proposed ap- 
plication for the grant. 

"The priority of the plan is the 
southern arterial," Commissioner 



Congress may not deliver 
Carter's arms-sale package 

WASHINGTON (AP)— There may be enough votes in a House com- 
mittee to reject President Carter's proposed sales of war planes to three 
Mideast countries despite predictions to the contrary by the panel's 
chairman, a survey of lawmakers showed Tuesday. 

Nineteen House members— a bare majority of the 37-member House 
International Relations Committee— said they will approve or are 
leaning in favor of a resolution against the sale of jet fighters to Saudi 
Arabia unless Carter makes concessions for Israel. 

Under congressional procedures a proposed arms sale by the 
executive branch must be disapproved by both houses within 30 calendar 
days of the time the president sends it to Capitol Hill. However, no 
specific congressional approval is needed. 

Under parliamentary procedure, a sale will go through unless 
Congress rejects it within 30 days. The House and Senate can halt such 
transactions only by passing resolutions of disapproval. 

The Associated Press questioned each member of the House com- 
mittee, which began considering the war planes deal on Monday. 



Robert Smith said. "It will benefit 
not only the strategic area (area 
marked for improvements under 
the program) but the entire area 
(city)." 

According to Commissioner 
Terry Glasscock, the first priority 
as far as he was concerned was the 
southern arterial. 

Stith said the funds appropriated 
for the southern arterial would be 
used primarily in land acquisition 
for the right of way for the arterial. 

In other business, the com- 
missioners passed two ordinances, 
which will go into effect June 15, 
limiting and prohibiting parking 
around Manhattan's junior high 
school and making Houston Street 
two-way from Juliette to Ninth 
Street. 

THE COMMISSION also con- 
sidered petitions to establish 
benefit districts in the recently- 
annexed Snowbird area Phase I for 
water, sanitary sewer and street 
improvements. 

In the action, the commissioners 
accepted the petitions, 
acknowledged their necessity and 
authorized the construction of the 
improvements. These items are 
subject to final approval by the 
commission. 

Snowbird Phase I is the northern 
half of the total 36. 93- acre plot 
annexed by the city at the Feb. 28 
commission meeting. 

An amendment prohibiting 
projecting signs downtown within 
five years was tentativly approved 
by the commission 



nobody picked me up in the second, 
I knew the Chiefs would." 

SPANI said he had been con- 
tacted by at least 15 teams and he 
had flown to Green Bay, San 
Fransisco, Buffalo and 
Philadelphia to meet with team 
officials before the draft. 

"I wanted to go someplace that 
was winning, but I think anybody 
would," Spani said. "Their 
(Chiefs) won-loss record wasn't 
very good and I hope I can change 
that. 

"I'd get more satisfaction 
building a program rather than 
going to an already built program. 
My first goal was to go someplace 
where I was needed." 

Spani admitted that he was 
concerned when he had heard 
about the first two rounds and still 
had not been contacted by a team. 

"I found out a little before two 
(o'clock)," Spani said. "Iwasvery 
tense when the call came, I was 
hoping for the second ( round) but I 
was really expecting the third." 

SPAM'S selection by the Chiefs 
culminated an outstanding career 
at K-State where he was chosen 
first team ail-American by the 
United Press International (UPI), 
Kodak (American Football 
Coaches Association), Football 
News and Kickoff Magazine. 

He was also chosen jll-Big Eight 
by the Associated Press and the 




Gary Spani 



United Press International, in 
which he was the leading defensive 
vote-getter. 

He also received second team 
ail-American by the Newspaper 
Enterprise Association and third 
team honors from the AP. 

Following his collegiate career, 
Spani was a finalist in the Heisman 
Linebacker Award and gathered 
the most valuable defensive player 
awards in the East-West Shrine 
Game and the Japan Bowl. He was 
also a participant in the Hula Bowl. 



Inside 



HOWDY! Rain Is expected today, and cool temperatures to go 
with it. Details, page 3... 

Tl PS for keeping the junk in your apartment yours, page 9... 

ONE K STATE athlete has made it big In ma| or league sports- 
Andy Replogle of the Milwaukee Brewers, page 11.., 

HOUSEMOTHERS are again being sought for some fraternities 
and sororities around campus, page 16... 

A K STATE forester earns a national award for his work last 
year, page 13... 



KANSAS STATE COLLEOIAN, Wt«\, May 3, 1978 



Anti-theft equipment would 
lock up joyriders' games 



WASHINGTON (AP)-The 
Transportation Department, 
leveling its sights primarily on 
joyriding thieves, announced plans 
Tuesday to require automobile 
manufacturers to install anti-theft 
equipment beginning with 1981 
models. 

The devices include protected 
ignition wires to prevent a car 
from being started without a key, 
hood latches that can be released 
only from inside the car and 
rounded door-lock mechanisms 
that prevent a door from being 
opened by poking a coat hangar 
through a window crack. 

Many newer model automobiles 
already include one or more of the 
protective systems that would be 
required by the proposal, an- 
nounced by the department's 
National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration. 

JOAN CLAYBROOK, the 

agency's administrator, said the 
proposed rule is aimed mostly at 
thwarting young thieves who steal 
vehicles for transportation or to 
steal parts. 

The proposed changes would be 
effective beginning with 1961 
model passenger cars and 1982 
model multipurpose vehicles and 
trucks with a gross vehicle weight 
of less than 10,000 pounds. 

The traffic safety administration 
estimated the manufacturers' cost 
of installing the security devices 
would be $1 to $2 for each 
passenger car and $3 to $5 for each 

FFA competition 
ends with awards 

The 55th annual Kansas Future 
Farmers of America (FFA) 
contests drew to a close Tuesday 
after three days of competition 
with an awards assembly at 
McCain Auditorium. 

After welcoming speeches by 
C.L. Norton, professor in animal 
science and industry and chairman 
for the contest committee, K-State 
president Duane Acker, Jim 
Lindquist, chairman of the 
agriculture committee for the 
Manhattan Chamber of Commerce 
and Student Body President Sam 
Brownback, awards were given to 
the top individuals and teams in 
each contest. 

The contests consisted of more 
than 1 ,000 students from 120 
Kansas high schools competing in 
such agricultural related events as 
livestock judging, agricultural 
mechanization, and agriculture 
newswriting. 



light truck 
vehicle. 



and multipurpose 




DERAILER 
GLASSES 

EDITION V 



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ARE HERE! 

THE DERAILER ts our own 
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secret blend of alcoholic spirits 
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THE PROPOSED changes would 

require the following: 

—The hood latch must be 
releasable only from the passenger 
compartment. 

—The ignition key must be 
different from the door and trunk 
keys. 

—Installation of door lock but- 
tons that cannot be opened by 
external devices such as a coat 
hangar. 

—Door locking mechanisms 
inside the panel must be shielded to 
prevent tampering. 

—The ignition system must have 
a capacity to become inoperable if 
the ignition lock is removed. 

—Ignition wires must be 
protected to reduce hot-wiring 
starts. 

—The ignition key alarm must be 
equipped to continue whenever the 
engine is turned off, the ignition 



key is left in the ignition and the 
door is opened. 

The agency said interested 
persons can comment on the 
proposal through July 31 by writing 
to the Docket Secton, National 
Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration, 400 Seventh 
Street, Washington, D.C., 20590. 




KANSAS STATE COLLE6MAN, Wid.,Hiy»,1l7l 



r -Boldface 
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 
Afghan death toll higher 

KABUL, Afghanistan— The death toll in the coup 
that overthrew the Afghan government last week 
was much higher than previously reported, 
authoritative sources said Tuesday. 

They estimated the number of dead in the 
thousands— some said it may have been as high as 
10,000— in the military rebellion against President 
Mohammed Daoud's authoritarian regime. The 
rebels, who announced that Daoud himself was 
among the dead, have established a pro- 
Communist regime. 

Casualty figures could not be independently 
confirmed by foreign reporters arriving in this 
hill-rimmed capital city after it had been virtually 
cut off from the outside world for five days. 

Battle still on over copper 

NEW YORK— Feisty stockholders, concerned 
employees and dozens of reporters squeezed into 
the annual meeting of Kennecott Copper Corp. 
Tuesday to witness the latest and most dramatic 
battle in the war for control of the nation's largest 
copper producer. 

The jam-packed meeting was called to order just 
minutes after a federal appeals court cleared the 
way for a vote on whether the ailing firm's entire 
17-member board of directors should be ousted and 
replaced by a slate organized by a company one- 
third Kennecott *s size. 

Curtiss-WrightCorp., a Wood-Ridge, N.J.-based 
conglomerate led by Roland Berner, began the 
takeover war about a month ago by seeking the 
proxies of other stockholders. If Curtiss-Wright, 
which itself owns 9.9 percent of Keiuiecott's stock, 
successfully collects about 41 percent of the votes 
of other stockholders, it would acquire apparent 
control of the copper firm. 

Jobs cut under budget plan 

WASHINGTON— President Carter's new budget 
rules resulted in 25 jobs being cut from the federal 
job-safety agency and led the Coast Guard to 
eliminate a boating program which had served its 
purpose, the White House said Tuesday. 

Those were among the benefits claimed for the 
first year of zero-base budgeting, which Carter has 
ordered the federal government to rely on ex- 
clusively in preparing spending requests for next 
year, a report by the Office of Management and 
Budget said. 

The report said that despite some start-up 
problems, the technique is off to a good start after 
a one-year tryout. 

Today is Sun Day 

NEW YORK— From dawn's first light to 
darkness' fall, the sun will be in the spotlight at 
home and abroad today for the celebration of "Sun 
Day," an effort to focus national and international 
attention on solar energy. 

The activities are organized by a coalition of 
groups and are being coordinated by Solar Action 
Inc., a non-profit, Washington-based organization 
that has its roots in such similar public-interest 
events as "Earth Day" and "Food Day." 

The celebration has the support of the Depart- 
ment of Energy and the expected participation of 
President Carter, who will speak at the Solar 
Energy Institute in Golden, Colo. 

The national observance will begin with a pre- 
dawn hike to the top of 1,530-foot Cadillac Moun- 
tain in Maine, the point where the sun's rays first 
strike the continental United States each day. An 
official of Acadia National Park, where the 
mountain is located, said several hundred persons 
are expected to make the climb. 



Local Forecast 

Cloudy to partly cloudy today with a slight chance of 
rain. High today in the 60s. Low tonight in the lower 40s. 
High Thursday in the 60s. 



Campus Bulletin 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 
RAM DASS SPEECH in Lawrence; for 
cwpool*, call Melody *f UFM, 532 »4 

COORDINATED UNDERORAOUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIITITICt applications ere 

betrm taken In Justin 107 through Mar " 

ASK CAMPUS AND BOARD DIRECTOR 

application* art aval labia in the SGS off let 
and art due Mays. 

PRIOKTTI DRILL TRAM tryoutl «ra In 
Ahearn Fitldhouat May 1 through May i from 

4 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for fall 
1*71 arc available in the Panhelltnk office, 
HoltXllOB. Deadline tor registration ii July 
25. 

AO MBCH SENIORS composite pictures 
will be taken at the photo service, Calvin 
besarnent, at 3:30 p.m. May 2 and 3. 

TODAY 
KSUARN EXEC will meet at Edwards Hell 
at* p.m.; KSUARH meets at Edwards Hall el 
7 p.m. 

Behavior earns 
Squeaky a move 

ALDERSON. W.Va. (AP) — 
Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, 
sentenced to life in prison for her 
attempt to assassinate President 
Gerald Ford in 1975, is being 
rewarded for good behavior with a 
transfer to a California prison, the 
warden of the Federal Refor- 
matory for Women said Tuesday. 



DEAR AGGIE: 

This girl in my Logic class 
told me she read in your column 
that Mother's Worry still has 60 
oz pitchers, while most other 
Aggieville bars have only 54 oz 
pitchers What's the logic 
behind that, Aggie? 

— STUPtDIFIKD 

Dear Stupid: Well. Kiddo, 



Mother s pitchers do cost a 
dime more, but look at it 
this way, would you rather pay 
5% more, or get 10% less beer'' 
Put that in your eye and rub it. 



Address any legitimate 
question to: 



DEAR AGGIE 

1216 Laramie 
Manhattan, Ks. 66502 



LATIN AMERICAN TABLE will meet at 
the Internet tonal Student Center at l : 33 p.m. 
Mr lecture on Altec end Mayan clvlllutlon. 

WEIGHT REDUCTION OROUP will meet 
in Lafene >* at *;30 e-m., noon, and 3 : 30 p. m. 

PRESIDENT ACKER will Speak In the 
union Cefskellsr at 2 :30 p.m. All students are 

Invited. 

pre law club organizational meeting 
will be In Eisenhower 15 at • p.m. All In- 
terested in attending law school are Invited. 

KSU AMATRUR RADIO CLUB Will meet at 
Dark Horse Tavern at 7;30 p.m. 

GERMAN TABLE will meet In Union 
Stateroom 2 tt 13-30 p.m. 

NATIONAL AUDUBON FILM ON ALASKA 
will be shown In Ackert 120 at 7:30 p.m. 

KSU young democrats will meet in 
Union 311 at 7 p.m. 



THURSDAY 
SOCIAL WORK CLUB will meet in union 
205C at e:30 p.m. 

CENTRR FOR AOINO SEMINAR will be In 
the Union Sunflower room at 12 :30 p.m. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION 
will meet at Danforth Chapel at t*i p.m. 

PTD STUDENT CHAPTER will meet In 

Waters el at Mi p.m. 

RHOMATES will meat at the AGR house at 
7 p.m. Attendance Is mandatory. 



SWEETHEARTS OP THE SHIELD AND 

DIAMOND will meet at the PIKA house at 
Bill p.m. Attendance Is mandatory. 

NORTHERN PLINT HILLS AUDUBON 

will meet it The UMHE, Deniwn Ave., at * » 
p.m. for pottuck dinner. 

phi KAPTIVS will meet at the Phi Keppe 

Thete hawse at J p.m. 

LATIN AMERICAN CLUB will meet at the 
international Student Center at 3 p.m. for 
elections. 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA Will meet In 
union 20* at 3:30 p.m. for Initiation and 
banquet. 

pre vet CLUB will meet In Dykttre 175 
at 7 p.m. for elections. 

FRIDAY 
NRM AND FORESTRY CLUBS Will meet 
at Call Hall at 5:30 p.m. for picnic . 

little SISTERS DP ATHENA will meet 
at the AK L hawse at »:* p.m. to ro to Turtle. 

UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES BOARD Will 
meet In the SGS conference room at U:J» 
a.m. 

ETA KAPPA NU Will meet at Or LenherYs 
tarm at 5 p.m. for picnic. 

INSTITUTE OP ELECTRICAL AND 

ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS will meet at 
Dr. Lenhert's lerm at 5 p.m. for picnic, 

ENGINEERING TECHMOLOOY annual 
spring picnic will be at Turtle puddle, south of 
the tubes, at S p.m. 



Today at 2:30 ' 

4 

Come 

TALK WITH ACKER! 

in the Union's Catskeller 

President Acker will 

comment and answer 

any questions you have 

concerning current 

campus issues 




NEXT STOP 
rORLM IHAILL 



'"BLACK SUNDAY* IS A QIQ ANTIC THRILLER! The best thing 
about 'Black Sunday' is Its pulsating rhythm of suspense and the glittering texture 
ot details it assembles as it drives its way toward its climax!" -Jack Kroii, Newsweek 









Robert Shaw Bruce Dern 

r CHAT- §AI LCaDAr 
/:€€ 9:4*5 

rCCLM HALL 



rsV 



Sunday 



COMING • ■ 

In everyone's life there's u 

SUMMER OF 42 

eoeo'Baoee; 




•••••••••••••••••••• 



r 



—— 



S 



./r 



Opinions 



m* 



..-' 



Articltt tppear 



inf an this page •« "•' MCMMrilf ripreianf tht tnllrt Collegia n 
mil or the «D<ra st Student Publications 



r" 



Amove 

for 
better 

relations 



■DITOR'I NOTI: Thlt tt MS* Aril part *f • rtiro-part •altarlal M It* Student 
C*mmiMk«ttwH Catnmmwa mlntHty kmtuwwi etterts. 

The Communications Committee of Student Senate 
has made a statement which sounds good, but can they 
doit? 

Mary Faubian, committee chairman, told the 
Collegian the committee wants to work toward im- 
proving relations between minorities and Student 
Government Services (SGS), which includes Student 
Senate. 

Her suggestions are overdue and an area which 
many campus leaders— political and non-political— do 
a lot of talking about, but that's about all. Many feel 
lack of interaction is not a problem and is "just the 
way it is." This lack of interaction, however, causes 
other problems. 

One of the main problems is a Student Senate that 
allocates many thousands of student dollars. The 
senate is not a good representation of the student body 
and, indeed, many senators have a distorted in- 
terpretation of just who their constituency is. 

THEIR opinions and judgments are based on a 
usually narrow sample of students, whoever resides in 
their living groups or who they interact with on a 
social basis. 

Many times, the international student, the ethnic 



minority or the dissident is forgotten. Or, worse yet, 
the student senator imagines some vague 
generalization of what the minority opinion is and acts 
upon that generalization. 

It is commendable that the Communications 
Committee plans to attend to the problem of rather 
sparse relations between SGA, and ethnics and in- 
ternational students. 

The committee needs to ask itself why such students 
don't get involved with SGS now. They need to think 
about ethnics who, in the past, have visited the senate 
chambers and been intimidated. 

THEY need to address the quality and effectiveness 
of senate liaisons to minority organizations. If a 
senator "doesn't understand" blacks or Chicanos, how 
can he act as a liaison and accurately communicate 
their needs to the rest of Student Senate? And, 
moreover, do these liaisons encourage or discourage 
ethnic involvement in Student Senate? 

The understated problem of "But I don't understand 
minorities" is a vast one which should be discussed— 
seriously— by Student Senate and all other campus 
organizations of influence, such as honoraries and 
service organizations. 

VELINA HOUSTON 
Editorial Editor 



Paul Rhodes 



Turning over new leaves 



Hey, gang, I'll let you in on a 
little secret. It's 4 a.m. (that's in 
the morning) and I've just finished 
the major project for one of my 
courses. And now I'm about to 
write my last and final column for 
the semester. 

No, I'm not high on some kind of 
drug— but you can bet your last 
free pass to the Putt Putt Golf 
Course that I will be when I get this 
thing done. So much for secrets. 

I'M THINKING that this makes 
six— count 'em, sue— semesters 
that I've paid tuition, books and 
room and board for higher 
education. Higher than what? 
After three years, 1 don't fee) a 
whole lot more euphric than I do 



after a relatively good weekend. 

A couple of semesters ago, I told 
my parents that I was thinking 
about quitting shool. They took it 
pretty well, but it really made me 
feel funny to see my mother 
kicking the cabinets under the sink 
and yelling, "Why, why, why" at 
my father. 

It was bad enough that I decided 
to become an engineer instead of a 
doctor, and then a journalist in- 
stead of an engineer, so I recon- 
sidered. Two semesters later, I'm 
still reconsidering. 

While I was busy cranking out 
my major project (why does it 
sound like I was printing coun- 
terfeit money?) Ray, the Kedzie 
Hall night janitor told me "there's 



sure a lot of you (journalism 
students) and there sure is a bunch 
of you who can't find jobs." 

Ray always did have a way of 
brightening up my night. They 
should give him an honorary 
degree in the "Psychology of 
Reality." 

BUT RAY got me 

thinking— which is something I 
haven't done at 3 a.m. or any other 
time of the day for about a week. Is 
K -State really preparing me for the 
future, and is the journalism 
department really preparing me 
for a job? Maybe I should talk to 
my adviser and see how many of 
my credit hours I can get tran- 
sferred to K.U. med school. 



But Ray's gone home now, so I'll 
have to wait until tomorrow night 
to ask his advice. Wilbur the 
hamster (the Collegian mascot) is 
here, and there's a couple of guys 
down the hallway, but I think 
they've been smoking dope... or 
something. I guess the decision is 
up to me. 

But you know, maybe that's what 
it all melts down to anyway. After 
second-guessing myself, asking for 
a thousand different opinions, and 
screwing up my ulcer with hours of 
worrying, I always end up making 
the final decision myself. Like 
deciding to wait until a few hours 
before a project is due to finish it. 

AND MAYBE it's also up to me 



to insure that I'm really getting a 
higher education. After a)), I'm the 
only one who knows just how high 
I've really been. 

So maybe with the two (or three 
or four) semesters I've got left in 
these hallowed (or is that 
hollowed?) halls, I should start 
getting my life together. You know, 
turn over a new leaf. 

If you've got the time next 
semester, maybe we could get 
together and I'l tell you how things 
are going. You can catch me over 
on the front lawn of Anderson 
Hall— I'll be the smiling, glassy- 
eyed senior turning over all the 
freshly-fallen leaves. 

See you next semester ! 



Letters to the editor 



Free speech 'should not become a cliche 9 



Editor. 

I read Hon Nelson's letter, 
"Don't restrain freedom of 
speech," (April 28 Collegian) with 
concern and even distress. The 
issues of the First and Fourteenth 
Amendments being raised by the 
planned American Nazi Pary 
march into Skokie, III., are of 
considerable interest to many 
Americans. I think these issues 



and the manner in which they are 
resolved should be of interest to the 
international community as well. 

In 1949, Illinois enacted a statute 
which made it a crime to 
disseminate or exhibit in a public 
place "anything that portrays 
depravity, criminality, unchastity, 
or lack of virtue of citizens of any 
race, color, creed or religion." 
Under this statute, a Chicagoan 



accused of distributing racist 
literature was convicted. His 
conviction was upheld by the U.S. 
Supreme Court in a 5 to 4 decision 
in 1952. (Beauharnais v. Illinois, 
343 U.S. 250.) 

IN 1964 in The New York Times 
v. Sullivan in a Supreme Court 
ruling which significantly 
broadened the interpretation of the 




First Amendment to protect all 
forms of political speech, Justice 
Brennan reaffirmed the ruling of 
the Court in Beauharnais v. Illinois 
as the exception to the rule. 

It is not my purpose to involve 
myself in a debate over the intent 
and interpretation of the First 
Amendment. I believe the ACLU 
position is proper and should be 
pursued. Yet, their interpretation 
should be pursued with the ap- 
propriate caveat; that the First 
Amendment should not become a 
cliche. 

The swastika in the 20th century 
western * world became 
synonymous with genocide. 
Ultimately, those who adhere to its 
politics are not so much concerned 
with politics of the state as they are 
with the determination of who shall 
inhabit the earth and who shall not. 



The swastika's idea refuses to 
share the earth with certain native 
races of our species. As a con- 
sequence, such an idea and display 
of the swastika attacks the concept 
of humanity itself and not the state. 

IT IS important to remember 
that the ultimate crime committed 
by the Nazis was not an action 
against the state nor a crime 
committed by one state against 
another. It was a crime by a state 
against humanity. Unwittingly, 
the ACLU has chosen to be 
obedient to what they believe to be 
the proper interpretation of the law 
of the land. At issue here is not the 
jurisprudence of the American 
Constitution, but, rather, the 
jurisprudence of man. 

Roger Friedmann 
Senior in anthropology 



Kansas State Collegian 



Wednesday, May 3, 1978 



THE COLLEGIAN it published by Student Publication!, Inc., Kansas Stat* University 
daily except Saturday*, Sunday*, holidays and vacation periods 

Offices ere tn the north wlno of Kedile Mall, phone J32 6SSS- 

SECOND CLASS pottage paid at Manhattan, Kansas t*SM. Publication No I»I510 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

SIS, on* calendar year, V so. on* semester 

THE COLLEGIAN functions in a legal I y autonomous relatiomhlp u/lth the university 
and is written and edited by student* serving the University com munlt y. 

Chris Williams. Editor 
Mark Tlndle. Advertising Manager 






KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wrt.. May 3. 1 >7« 



Letters to the editor 



Handicapped issues are timely; 
wheelchair competition ignored 



Editor. 

I am writing to issue a complaint 
for the Collegian's failure to print 
information regarding the recent 
Students for Handicapped Con- 
cerns (SHC) First Annual 
Wheelchair Competition which was 
held Tuesday, April 25. Although a 
Collegian reporter was supposedly 
present, that person made no effort 
to approach me as master of 
ceremonies. I realize that it is 
frequently not the fault of the in- 
dividual reporter, but the staff 
members responsible for putting 
the newspaper together. 



I cannot view it as a mere 
oversight, however. While I am 
issuing complaints, let me say that 
as one of the three new 
organizations recently funded by 
SGA, we were the only 
organization to not only receive the 
amount tentatively allocated, but 
nearly the full amount we had 
originally requested. Receiving 
funds for work study students to 
operate a shuttle vehicle during 
severe winter weather for both the 
permanently and temporarily 
handicapped was the important 
and controversial item on our 
budget which served to make 



Wider coverage needed 



Editor, 

Given the Collegian's position 
(or what I interpret as the 
Collegian's position) regarding 
coverage of school-related events, 
I have decided that the Collegian 
staff is far more competent at 
making asses of themselves than is 
our beloved Student Senate. 

Perhaps it is unreasonable to ask 
for coverage of such elusive events 
as debate tournaments (despite K- 
State's growing national 
prominence in competitive 
speaking, most Collegian readers 
probably ask, "What's debate?") 
and agricultural competitive 
events. 

THIS IS THE nature of recent 
Collegian headline grabbers, e.g. 
Peruvian whorehouses, Naomi 
Vemura's thrilling trek to the 
North Pole and a 25-year-old man 
climbing the Sears Tower to 
protest the killing of whales. 

In a recent column, Collegian 
Editor Chris Williams suggests 
that one way of decreasing the bulk 
of advertising printed in our dear 
paper would be for the Student 
Senate to increase funding to the 
Collegian. 

That would be unwise for two 
reasons. One is that actually, the 
entertainment value of the 
Collegian would increase if there 
were more ads. I much prefer 
looking at Siglinda Steinfuller than 



reading about crazies who climb 
buildings to save whales . 

The other reason is why should 
Student Senate fund the Collegian 
at all given the paper's "legally 
autonomous relationship with the 
University?" 

I MEAN, if there were no 
University newspaper (or paper 
which uses the University's name) 
then our poor, overworked jour- 
nalism majors wouldn't have to 
knock themselves out to provide us 
with paper to wrap the garbage in. 

This is, of course, a somewhat 
one-sided account of the 
Collegian's endeavors. The paper 
has indeed provided accounts of 
various University-related events, 
but those covered that are not 
athletic events are invariably few 
and far between. 

I do not suggest that the 
Collegian not use "joumaistic 
judgment" of what should or 
should not be printed— simply that 
more consideration be given to the 
University as a whole. 

Gary Owens 
Sophomore in political science 



rather than break us in the end. 
The outcome of our final 
allocations was unprecedented 
especially when the conservatism 
of our present Student Senate is 
considered. 

What I must stress to you is that 
as a public event, we sought to 
attract attention— largely through 
our own resources. The event was 
and is a source of pride to all who 
worked so diligently. We created 
an atmosphere of empathy— one 
which touched many hearts as well 
as unleashing the sheer fun of the 
event. One participant said, "I 
never realized it was so hard to use 
a wheelchair." This is the im- 
pression we hoped to convey. 

We question the Collegian's 
methods of grading news. You 
have given more than adequate 
coverage to other groups such as 
bigots. We deserve equal coverage 
in the name of fairness and most 
importantly because handicapped 
issues have never been more 
timely. 

Donna Gore 

Graduate student in speech 

pathology 

SHC president 



FOR 

Mother's Day 

give her 
The Horn of Years 

Poetry by 

Helen Keithley Lamb 

featured 

in all Manhattan 

bookstores 

Available in both 
paperbacks & hardbacks 



The Collegian welcomes 
letters from readers. 

All letters must be signed 
and include the year >n school, 
classification and the 
telephone number of the 

writer, 

Because of time and space 
considerations, the editors 
reserve the right to shorten or 
reject material at their 
discretion. 

Letters may be submitted 
t preferably typed) in either 
Kedzie 116 or 103. 

All letters must be received 
by noon the day before 
publication. 



Communications 
Specialties 

L IMITED 



Blue Hills 



of Manhattan 



776-7292 



CB Radio 

Amateur Radio 

Background Music 

Public Address 

Jim-Pak Electronic Components 



Car Stereo 
Home Computers 



10% 



Discount to Students with K.S.U. 
I.D. Card During May 



The best thing that could happen to yoghurt.. .and you! 



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that has happened to yoghurt in an age. It took 
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MANHATTAN «»N«H 



OPENING SOON 
Aggie Hair Port 

711 N. 11th 

owned by Dee Bailey 
formerly from the Hair Shack 

Check Collegian for opening date 



Congratulations New Members 

of Alpha Chi Sigma 

Professional in Chemistry 



Steven D. Glacy 
Wayne A. Suoboda 
Fred M. Triebe 
Kathy R. Gromer 
Dan C. Dolsberry 



Steven K. Loof 
Dr. Larry Erickson 
Joe A. Yocom 
Rita L. Gilmore 
Cynthia L, Schuller 



Just in Time for Mother's Day! 

INSIDE 
SIDEWALK SALE! 

5 Days— Starts Wednesday thru Sunday 



6—18 
Coordinates 

MO each piece 
2 for $ 15°° 

Blazers— Skirts 
Blouses— Vests 



6—18 

Coordinates 

Linen Look 

Vi Price 

For 2 pieces 
Brown — White 
Black— Beige 



5— 13 
JR. FASHION 

PANTS 






LAY 
AWAV 
PLAN 


*8" 




LotsofS's 




&7'S 







Jr. & Misses 

Long DRESSES 
Long SKIRTS 

$ 15 & $ 25 



Open 
Nights 



Sundays 

11-5 



One Rack 

Coordinates 

Blouses — Skirts 

Golf Shirts 

$7.50 each 



Reg. 

One Group 



Kej{ . toS*i 

DRESSES 
$ 25 & $ 30 

New Spring 
Styles 



2 piece 

Pant Suits 

Coordinates 

$ 25 & $ 30 

Skirts — Blouses 
Pants — Jackets 



SAIL 
WIGS 

$10.0(1 



JR 

Special Groups 

TOPS 

20% OFF 

JEANS 



New Shipments: Alex Colman, Joyce Brook Valley, 
and Campus Casuals Summer Coordinates. Sun- 
dresses, Mu Mu's, Lace Shawls, Peasant Dresses, Sue 
Bret's special occasion long SUMMER DRESSES. 
JEWLERY: Large new selection of stick pins, shim- 
mering chain necklaces and bracelets for MOTHER'S 
DAY ! 



LUCILLE'S 

Westloop Shopping Center 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«J.,May 3, 1978 



Easing access 

Transition plan to help handicapped 



By KAREN EWING 
Collegian Reporter 
A transition plan which proposes 
changes to make the K-State 
campus more accessible for the 
physically handicapped will be 
sent to the Board of Regents for 
approval in June. 

Upon Regents approval, the plan 
will be considered by the state 
legislature in Jan, of 1979 for 
funding. 

"The transition plan, prepared 
by the committee headed by Paul 
Young, vice president for 
Facilities was finalized December 
3, 1977. It entails what physical 
conditions exist for the han- 
dicapped and lays out a plan for 
changes over a period from June 3, 
1977 to June 3, 1980," said Ron 
Downey, chairman on the 
Institutional Self -Study Committee 
for the Handicapped. 

Downey said all state schools 
under the Board of Regents are 
submitting the three-part plan, 
which is divided to meet urgent 
needs, necessary needs and 
desirable needs. 

"There are lots of problems. We 
are speaking in terms of two to 
three million dollars to make 
changes at K-State," Young said. 

WATER FOUNTAIN heights, 



curb cuts in sidewalks, ramps, 
elevators, properly spaced and 
with weighted doors, lowered 
mirror and sink heights in 
bathrooms, raised letter signs, and 
lower elevator buttons are some of 
the suggested changes the K -State 
campus needs for the physically 
handicapped, Downey said. 

"According to federal 
regulation, program accessibility 
is necessary. People need to get to 
class. For example, a person in a 
wheelchair would probably be 
unable to get into Eisenhower. 
Changes will have to be made so he 
can get to his class," Downey said. 

According to Downey , there are 
quite a few buildings which have 
poor accessibility to handicapped 
persons. So far only minor 
changes, such as the moving 
classes, has been made to improve 
accessibility. 

"We know of approximately 100 
people requesting services. This 
doesn't count all the handicapped. 
These are just the people who have 
requested changes," he said. 

According to Downey, Student 
Senate recently voted for a tran- 
sportation system to be made 
available for those with limited 
mobility on bad weather days. 

ALTHOUGH K-STATE has no 

history of discriminating against 
handicapped in admission to the 



University, because of the en- 
vironmental factor at K-State, 
physically handicapped in- 
dividuals are apt not to come, 
Downey said. 

"Many physically handicapped 
go to a college such as Emporia 
State because they have their 
physical accessibility problem 
taken care of," he said. 

The federal regulations deal with 
nondiscrimination in the area of 
employment, limiting persons in 
intercollegiate athletics because of 
physical impairment and other key 
academic and employment issues. 

"It's no longer legal for a person 
to be cut from a team just because 
he has, for example, one eye. 
Under new policies, the coach has 
to give the individual a chance to 
prove his ability," Downey said. 

THE REAL problem centering 
around the handicapped is the 
grading and testing of individuals 
with visual, auditory, or other 
related problems, he said. 

"Such items as voice recorders, 
voice-plus calculators, a sight dog 
and other equipment are necessary 
for these persons," he said. 

A self-evaluation study which 
reviews current practices and 
policies toward the handicapped 
will be discussed in an open 
meeting at 10 a.m., May 9 in Union 
207. 



County to dump landfill for new site 



ByKARENVINING 

Collegian Reporter 

Riley County Commissioners are 
in the process of choosing a new 
landfill site for the county. 

The site that has been chosen is 
located west of Rosencutter Road 
and south of the Sunrise Cemetery 
on Stagg Hill Road. 

The landfill now in use three 
miles south of Manhatan has only 
two years left before it is filled. 

Darrell Westervelt, Riley County 
commissioner, said the site was 
chosen because it had the 
preferred soil type, was close to the 
city of Manhattan, in the vicinity of 
the old landfill, screened from the 
public roads by natural shrubs, has 
railroad access and a deep ravine 
so a hole doesn 't have to be dug . 

THERE ARE only three places 
in Riley Cuonty that hve the 
preferred soil type for landfill use, 
said Dan Harden, Riley County 
engineer. 

There is one deposit on the 
grounds of Ft. Riley, another 
deposit within 10,000 feet of the 
Manhattan Municipal Airport and 
the area chosen. 

The Federal Aviation 
Administration will not allow a 
landfill to be built that close to an 



airport because the landfill will 
attract birds which can interfere 
with incoming and outgoing 
planes. 

The preferred soil type is geary 
silt loam and it is preferred as a 
covering soil because of is 
resistance to erosion. 

Harden said he didn't know what 
depth the deposit on the site is 
because residents haven't allowed 
the land to be studied. 

"From the samples we have 
already taken, there seems to be 
enough geary silt loam soil for the 
landfill, Harde said, "but we will 
not know until we can study the 
land." 

ONLY TWO residents live within 
one half mile of the proposed site, 
Westerbelt said. Alice Stockwell, 
one of the residents, said she 
wasn't notified of the County 
Commissioners' intention until 
April 21 when Jim Ryan, a real 
estate appraiser, called and made 
an appointment to appraise her 
land. 

Stockwell said she has reser- 
vations about this particular site 
being as good as the com- 
missioners think it is. 

"It is near the cemetery and a 
large residential housing area, has 



a rock ledge and has small springs 
running through the land," Stock- 
well said . 

She said the landfill would be the 
source of unpleasant odors which 
could blow over the nearby 
residential area. 

Some of those residents met with 
county commissioners Monday to 
protest the proposed site for the 
landfill. 

Residents of the area said smoke 
and offensive odors will be carried 
over to their area by southerly 
winds. 

In August 1977, the county 
commissioners proposed K-State 
use the landfill's solid waste as fuel 
for the new power plant. 

The proposal is still under 
consideration. 

The commission doesn't know 
when the new landfill will be ready. 
Some land has to be purchased 
from area residents before the site 
can be used. 




The automatic 

moped 

on sale at 

Mr, Moped 

312 S. 3rd 

1-5 M-F 9-6 Sat, 



Downey said the meeting's 
purpose is to discuss the study 
before finalization and make 
recommendations to President 
Duane Acker on needed changes 
and practices. 



SMN DAV-- IUW &*V -- SUN t>AN -• 




TODAY IS A 

SOLAR AWARENESS 

CELEBRATION 

VVE& MAY 3 

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^ THANK YOU 

CHRIS BROWN 

SENIOR CUSS ACTING VICE-PRESIDENT 

WE COULDNT HAVE MADE IT WITHOUT YOUl 

JULIE HAMPL-President 
CATHY MATLACK-Secretary 
CASEY GARTEN -Treasurer 



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For a very special day and a very 
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mother Give her Lenox, the gift 
she'li treasure all year long May 
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A delightiui w *y ,0 add *P'c6 to 

her lite Beautifully gift-boned 

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Cranloril Vase— 
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hors doeuvres. candies or nuls 

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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wed., May 3, 1t78 



«* 



r* 




BUSINESS COLLEGE 
BANQUET-DANCE 

Saturday, May 6th 

6:30 at Elk's Club 
Tickets *6.50 

Available in Calvin Hal 



pnoto by Susan Pfnnnmuller 



Meet the press 

Dave Sampson, junior in range management, presses dry a mass of weeds 
gathered Tuesday near Waters Hall. The final product will be used as a teaching 
aid in a plant identification class. 

Scholars join Phi Beta Kappa 



M.D./D.V.M. Degree— Europe/U.SA 

IT IS NOT TOO LATE (or you to enroll in the 
programs of the INSTITUTE OF INTERNA- 
TIONAL MEDICAL EDUCATION which otter: 

1 Enrollment tor Fall W8 •" medical schools in Europe 

2 MS m cooperation witn *ecoijni?ed colleges ana uni- 
versit'es in the United States leading to advanced place- 
ment in merltcsi schools In Spun Italy and other 
European countries 

3 While you a r c in attendance 81 the medical school, the 
Institute provides ASui-olemental Basic Medical Sciences 
Curriculum which prepares students lor transfer into an 
American medical school (COTRANS) 

4 For those students who do not- transfer, [tic Institute 
provides accredited supervised clinical clerkships at 
cooperating United States teaching hospitals 

5 During the dual year ot foreign medical school, the Insti- 
tute provides a supplemental and comprehensive clinical 
medical curriculum which prepares you to take the 
ECFMG examination 

The Institute has been responsible lor processing more 
American students into foreign medical schools than any 
other organization 
For further Inlormation and application, contact 

INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL EDUCATION 

Chartered hy (fie Regents of lh».' University ut the Stale ol New York 

3 East Mth Street, New York NY 10022. l/t?l S32-?0B9 



Seventeen students were 
initiated Thursday into the K -State 
chapter of Phi Beta Kappa 

Found in 1776 during the 
American Revolution, Phi Beta 
Kappa is the nation's oldest 
scholastic honorary. Membership 
is awarded to men and women who 
are exceptional scholars and 
contributors to the humanities, 
science, or literature. 

At the inititation dinner in the K- 
State Union, David Hacker, 
visiting professor of journalism, 
spoke to the initiates. He was an 
editor of the National Observer, 
the national weekly news 
publication, prior to its demise in 
1977. 

Initiated at the ceremony were 
David (.'ink, senior in pre- medicine 
and biochemistry; Grace Hwang, 
senior in political science; Shelagh 
Stromberg, senior in English; 
Louis Wetzel, senior in chemistry; 



Charles Coffeey, December 
graduate in pre-medicine; Paul 
Rae Jacques, senior in political 
science; Donna Jo Francis, senior 
in Spanish and English; Rex 
Marion Joyce, senior in 
biochemistry; Dianne Hart, senior 
in modern languages; Donald 
McSweyn, senior in philosophy; 
Michelle Miller, junior in jour- 
nalism and mass communications; 



Theodore Nichols, December 
graduate in philosophy; Patrick 
Sargent, junior in accounting; Kim 
Stegman, senior in social work; 
Jill Stewart, senior in modern 
languages; Steven Turner, senior 
in modern Spanish and psychology, 
and Dana Jo Tyrell, a December 
graduate in microbiology. 



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ATTENTION ENGINEERING STUDENTS 

Elections for Council Officers 
and Sophomore Rep. 

Today, May 3, from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 

Vote in 
Cardwell and Seaton Front Lobbies 

Bring your Fee Card 



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Dept. ol Pre-Deitgn Profusions. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«d., M*y 3, 1 976 



Jewish-Russian immigrants huddle 
near Jersey City placement center 



JERSEY CITY, N.J. «AP)— Just 
a ferry ride from Ellis Island 
where their ancestors landed 
before them, Soviet dissidents 
seeking political asylum are fin- 
ding a haven. 

More than 100 Russian families, 
most of them Jewish, have found 
homes in this North Jersey com- 
munity, once infamous for its large 
number of corrupt politicians. 

Jersey City, across the Hudson 
River from New York City, was 
"the ideal regional place" to set up 
a placement center for Soviet 
emigres, said Arthur Abba 
Goldberg, founder of the Com- 
mittee for the Absorption of Soviet 
Emigres. 

"Most of the immigrants coming 
in from the Soviet Union want to 
live in New York City or its en- 
virons," Goldberg said, "New 
York City is still the culture center 
of the world... There are more 
cultural things to which they can 
relate from an international and 
Jewish point of view." 

THE UNITED STATES has 
provided a haven for Soviet 
literary personalities, scientists 
and other political dissidents. 
About 4,000 Soviet Jews were given 



special refugee status last year to 
allow them to immigrate to the 
United States. 

Goldberg, a 37-year-old in- 
vestment banker in New York, said 
he founded CASE in 1974 because of 
his Lithuanian heritage and his 
desire to do a "mitzvah," a Yiddish 
term for a good deed. 

Goldberg said the CASE-assisted 
Soviet emigres "integrate pretty 
well into the community but 
they're never going to become 
American Americans. You can't 
divorce 20 to 25 years of your life." 

He said the immigrants range 
"from the highly educated to blue 
collar workers. It cuts right across 
the board." Most are in their 20s or 
early 30s and typically have one, 
child whom they send to private or 
religious schools in Jersey City. 

CASE SPONSORS refugees so 
they can obtain entry visas and 
serves as a housing and em- 
ployment placement service once 
they arrive. 

"The immigrants have a mar- 
velous information network," 
Goldberg said. "Our name is 
passed around the immigrant 
grapevine to friends and relatives 
and friends of friends." 



CASE, which receives funds 
from the city and through 
charitable contributions, is 
renovating six row houses and has 
"completed, under construction or 
under contract, work on 150 to 200 
units," Goldberg said. The 
organization, he added, is com- 
pleting a deal on a five-story 
building in downtown Jersey City 
to turn into a community center for 
the Soviet population here. 

Jersey City, the state's second- 
largest city with a population of 
257,000, is the home of the Hudson 
County Democratic political 
machine, once headed by Frank "I 
am the Law" Hague. 



Committee will study 
feasibility of Nichols 

A committee established by Paul Young, vice president for Facilities, 
will work to prepare a program for the feasibilty study of Nichols. 

The committee will be concerned with deciding the use of the facility, 
the feasiblity of using the existing structure and the economic feasibility 
of the project. 

The final draft of the program should be completed by June 1, 1978, in 
order to obtain the necessary approvals of the program, he said. 

"The program will be presented to the Regents for their review and 
approval at the June meeting of the board," Young said 

"Assuming then, that they approve it, we would go ahead immediately 
after the first of July with retaining an architecture firm to do the 
study," he said. 

THE FEASIBILITY study should be completed by November. 

"It has to be completed in time to report to the legislature when it 
meets in January," he said. 

"The earliest construction might start would be the summer of 1980, 
he said. "We would have construction completed by the summer of 

1962." 

"Now, that's with no delays," Young said. 

The committee consists of Norma Bunton, speech; Robert Burnham, 
architecture; Vince Cool, ex-officio resource person; Martha Cornwell, 
Alumni Association; Bernd Foerster, consultant; Lance Kramer, 
Continuing Education; Gerald Maddox, art; Allen Roberts, junior in 
architecture and design and Kent Stewart, administration and foun- 
dations. 

The $45,000 for the feasibility study of reconstructing Nichols was 
approved by the 1978 Kansas Legislature. 



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Inquire about rolls, cakes, cookies, pies! 
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SENIORS! 
CLASS OF 1977 




There are still some Senior Shirts available. 

On Sale now at the Alumni House. Available in small sizes only! 

*1.00 eoch 

(The shirt is a white, short sleeve rugby shirt Very appropriate for your casual attire.) 



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419 Poyntz 

"The friendly store with the sliding door" 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«d., May S, 1»» 



■ Locking up doors, windows 
\*key to apartment security 



HyKAKKN HOUSTON 
Collegian Reporter 

A man's home may be his castle, 
but if that home is an apartment, 
he should take some precautions to 
keep it secure. 

Lt. Nick Edvy of the Riley 
County Police Department said 
apartment security is just as 
important when a student is at 
homeaswhenhesaway, 

"There are quite a few 
burglaries in large apartment 
complexes during times when 
there is obviously no one at home," 
Edvy said, "But, people should 
also lock their doors while they are 
at home because someone could 
walk right in before they have a 
chance to think." 

The most important thing to do if 
attacked in your apartment is to 
scream and fight with anything 
available, Edvy said. 

PREVENTATIVE measures to 

insure difficulty in breaking into an 
apartment include checking the 
window and door locks before 
signing a lease or asking the 
landlord to supply the locks 

A dead bolt lock, or "double 
lock," which has key openings on 
both sides and is available fo $5 to 
$15, is the best type to have. 

Edvy said a peep hole in the door 
is also good to have and can be 
purchased for $1.50 to 13.50 

Other things Edvy said a student 
should look for when renting an 
apartment is whether there is light 
in the hall. 

"Some of the large apartment 
complexes don't even have lights 
in the halls and anyone could be 
waiting in a place where it would 
be hard to see them," Edvy said. 

If the person is going to be gone 



for a few days, they should have 
someone pick up mail and 
newspapers and leave a friend or 
neighbor a key so the apartment 
can be checked daily . 

Outside of the apartment, Edvy 
said the buddy system is the best 
policy. 

"Always walk with someone else 
and don't walk close to the building 
or bushes," he said. "If you walk 
away from the building, and if a 
person comes after you, you have a 
few feet jump on him . " 

WHEN OPENING the door to 
answer it, don't take the safety 
chain off the door and if the person 
asks to make a phone call, offer to 
make it for him. 

If the caller is a person from a 
company such as a repairman or 



salesman, ask for identification 
and if it looks suspicious, call the 
company or police. 

The worst problem in the 
summer, Edvy said, is if an 
apartment is on the first floor and 
the windows are left open for air. 
He said the best thing to do is to 
buy a window fan and reverse it 

"This (an open window) is 
definitely bad," Edvy said. "If you 
have a fan, though, they're (a 
person breaking in> not going to 
stick their hands in a running fan. 
Otherwise, there's nothing you can 
do about open windows. It's almost 
an open invitation." 

IN CASE something is taken 
from a student's apartment, many 
insurance companies offer renter's 
insurance to cover personal losses. 



K-State judging team places 
in Iowa livestock competition 

Members of the K -Slate junior livestock judging team placed in the top 
10 in a livestock judging contest sponsored by the Iowa State University 
Block and Bridle Club, at Ames, Iowa, Saturday. 

Daniel Hale, junior in animal sciences and industry, placed first in the 
overall competition and first in sheep judging. 

Gloria Walters, sophomore in animal sciences and industry, was third 
overall, first in swine judging, tied for first in reasons and was second in 
horse judging. 

Crandell McLean, junior in animal sciences and industry, placed 
fourth overall, third in beef judging and fourth in sheep judging., 

Warren Kroeker, junior in animal science and industry, was fifth 
overall, fifth in swine judging and fifth in reasons. 

KRUCK SCHL1CHAU. junior in animal sciences and industry, placed 
seventh overall, and first in beef judging. 

Charles Sessions, junior in animal sciences and industry, was eighth 
overall and tied for first in reasons. 

Other members of the K -State team placed in beef judging. These 
students included Beth Pf ingle, junior in animal sciences and industry, 
second; Bob Haynes, junior in animal sciences and industry, fourth; and 
David Spears, junior in animal sciences and industry, fifth. 




this summer 

travel-hard work 

ave. pay-$ 1 200/ mo. 

room 205C-student union 
today-l,3:30,6or8:30 

don't dress up, 
but please be prompt. 




CARTOON FESTIVAL 



Wed., May3. 



10:3* 



12:30 
2:30 




presented by 

Feature Films 

1006 





r 



Gift Ideas... 

..for the graduate on your list ! 



KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY : THE QUEST FOR IDENTITY by James C. Carey $10.95 

THE AMERICAN FARMER by Richard Seim $5.95 

THE SECOND RING OF POWER by Carlos Castenada $9.95 

CASEMENT OF JUNIATA by Donald Ornduff $7.95 

LAND OF THE POST ROCK by Grace Muilenburg and Ada Swineford $13.50 

IN HIS IMAGE: THE CLONING OF A MAN by David Rorvik $8.95 

ONE L by Scott Turow $8.95 

WHISTLE by James Jones $10.95 ,.««.*.«. 

WHERE DO I GO FROM HERE WITH MY LIFE? by Crystal & Bolles $7.95 

MOVING UP Eli Djeddah $4.95 

THE NEW GAMES BOOK $4.95 

STONEHENGE by Theo Bergstrom $3.95 

WHEREBY WE THRIVE by John Schlebecker $12.95 

THE PROPHET by Kahlil Gibran $5.00 

PASSAGES by Gail Sheeby $2.50 

MEMOIRS OF CHIEF JUSTICE EARL WARREN $12.95 

DULLES by Leonard Mosley $12.95 

ALL THE STRANGE HOURS by Loren Eiseley $9.95 

THIS WAS WHEAT FARMING by Kirby Brumf ield $8.95 

THE ENDS OF POWER by H.R. Haldeman $12.95 

THE BRENDAN VOYAGE by Tim Severin $12.95 

ON PRESS by Tom Wicker $10.95 




k -state union 



bookstore 




0301 



10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W»<J.,M»y 3, 1»78 



Hard work accounts for Hall's wins 



By JIM GIBBONS 
Collegian Reporter 

Jeff Hall is currently the 
number one singles player on the 
K-State men's tennis team, but 
Hall's climb to number one hasn't 
been easy. Indeed, it almost never 
happened. 

"I was planning on going to KU 
after graduation from high school 
because a lot of my friends were 
going and it was the thing to do 
then," Hall said. 

"I even enrolled at KU but 
changed my mind partly because 
of tennis. I didn't think I had much 
of a chance of making the KU team 



but I felt I could make the K-State 
team." 

Hall is a senior in accounting 
who has made all A's except for a B 
in English Comp I his freshman 
year. He has been recommended 
as a Scholastic ail-American by his 
coach, Steve Snodgrass. 

Hall was the number five player 
his freshman year. Then the tennis 
team disbanded for a year and a 
half due to lack of funds. 

"None of us had any idea that the 
tennis team would be terminated," 

Hall said. "We even began 
practice in the fall to get ready for 




Ptioto by Craig C handler 



Mfffiwl 



I TlKff III Mffn-inciit! fa 




NUMBER ONE. .Jeff Hall, senior In accounting, 
displays the style that has made him the top player on 
K-State's tennis team for the past two years. 



Yanks top K.C. 

NEW YORK <AP) — Lou 
Piniella belted a home run in the 
sixth inning that lifted the Yankees 
to a 4-2 triumph over the Kansas 
City Royals Tuesday night. 

Piniella drilled his first home run 
of the year with two out off Larry 
Gura,2-1. 

New York trailed 2-1 before 
doubles by Willie Randolph and 
Thurman Munson accounted for 
the tying run. 

Hunter, 1-3, scattered five hits in 
seven innings. 



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the spring season. Then we got the 
bad news. We were shocked." 

ESTATE'S tennis team was 

reinstated two years ago and Hall 
became the number one player 
partly by default. He was the only 
player on the team with varsity 
exprience. 

But Hall has worked hard to earn 
his ranking. He has steadily im- 
proved, working on all aspects of 
his game. 

Hall learned tennis when his 
parents moved to Manhattan from 
Fargo, North Dakota. His friends 
in the eighth grade taught him the 
sport and he played constantly. 

"We used to come down to the 
University courts when they were 
below the Union because I only 
lived two blocks away and play for 
hours," Hall said. 

Hall made the junior high tennis 
team although he head only been 
playing a short time. 

HALL WAS one of the top players 
for the Manhattan High tennis 
team for three years before con- 
tinuing his career at K-State. 

Accounting is not an easy 
curriculum and Hall has tried to 



combine tennis and getting an 
education as effectively as 
possible. He takes 19 hours during 
the fall when the team doesn't play 
and 12 hours in the spring when the 
team is competing. 

No scholarships are awarded in 
tennis and so Hall has had to pay 
his own way. He supplements his 
income with a part-time job, 
another demand on his time. 

The tennis team provides 
strings, balls and a uniform con- 
sisting of shorts, shirt and war- 
mups. But Hall has to supply his 
own racquet and shoes. 

"I go through a pair of shoes 
every two weeks," Hall said, "so I 
buy cheap canvas shoes. 1 can't 
afford to buy leather shoes when 
they wear out so fast. The concrete 
surface of our courts eats shoes 
like they are nothing." 

THE BEST, and costliest racket 
strings, are made from cow gut. 
They give better control and speed. 
But Hall and his teammates have 
to use nylon strings which are 
cheaper and more durable. 

"I've used gut before but it 
wears out too fast. If I used gut all 
the time I'd have to restring my 



racket every couple of weeks and 
we can't afford it," Hall said. 

Another problem has been the 
elements, primarily the wind. 
Since the Washburn complex is on 
a hill, there is no windbreak. So K- 
State tennis players have to con- 
tend with the wind in addition to 
their opponent when they play at 
home. 

"The wind is horrible most of the 
time. It used to be much nicer 
when the courts were by the Union 
where they were sheltered from 
the wind. And 1 wonder why the 
(Washburn) courts were built on 
the hill and the athletic dormitory 
below it? If the courts had been 
built where the athletic dormitory 
is they'd be sheltered from the 
wind," Hall said. 

HALL SAID the future of the K 
State tennis team depends on the 
financial and moral support it 
receives from the athletic 
department. 



Don't be 
fifdish* 



PARADISE BAND 



Frosty Lawson— Trumpet 
Joe Graber— Sax 
Jon Burlingham— Trombone 
Harrell Bosarge— Drums 



Featuring 



Randy Detrick— Guitar 
Larry Letcher— Bass 
Kevin Sloan— Key Board 
Vince Parret— Lead Vocal 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wtd-.Miy 3.19TS 



11 



From K-State to Milwaukee via Mexico 



By l)l( K WAUNKK 
Collegian Keporter 

KANSAS CITY-Andy Replogle 
never did care much for college 

"I didn't learn that much but 1 
had a good lime," he says of his 
three years at K-State. 

But he did care about baseball 
and he had a right arm that 
created most of that interest. An 
arm that set and still holds nearly 
all of the career pitching marks at 
K-State. An arm that is now ear 
ning him a living as a member of 
the Milwaukee Brewers pitching 

staff 

And although the Brewers aren't 
world beaters now, or may never 
be, Replogle is just content that he 
has made it to the majors 

"It doesn't make any diffemce 
who 1 pitch for," Replogle said 
while in Kansas City last weekend 
with the Brewers "I just wanted 
the opportunity to be here and the 
opportunity to pitch." 

The road to the majors for 
Replogle hasn't been the 
straightest one, unless of course, 
you consider going through St. 
Petersburg. Fla., Little Rock, 
Ark., Guasave, Mexico, Baltimore 
and then Milwaukee straight. 

REPLOGLE started his journey 
after leaving K-State at the con- 
clusion of his junior year (1975). In 
those three seasons, Replogle 
hurled 233.1 innings, recorded 223 
strikeouts and fashioned a record 
of 25-10. His sophomore year, 
Replogle led the 'Cats to a second 
place finish in the Big Eight. 

The St. Louis Cardinals drafted 



Replogle thai summer and he 
spent the remainder of that 
summer and the next half of the 
season in St. Petersburg with the 
Cardinals A farm club. 

He labored the next season and a 
half in Little Rock at the Cards' A A 
farm club. 

It was this past winter when 
Replogle began his bold move to 




the majors. The move was to pitch 
in Guasave, Mexico, which isn't 
exactly Midtown. America. 

"You could walk thorough it in 20 
minutes," Replogle said. "It's 
better than driving because there 
were huge chuckholes in the 
streets and there were crazy 
drivers everywhere." 

FORTUNATELY he survived 

both the streets and the batters in 
the Mexican League. Replogle 
completed 47 innings without 
allowing a run and the Baltimore 
Orioles were so impressed they 
bought his contract from the 
Cards. 

Replogle reported to the Orioles' 
spring training camp and believed 
he had made the squad. 

"I thought I had made it with 
Baltimore but on the last day of 
spring training Milwaukee bought 
my contract. 

And that is where the lanky, 6-5 
Replogle plans to stay. At least if 



he starts pitching belter. In his 
four appearances on the mound, 
Replogle has accumulated a 6.17 
earned run average and allowed 
nine runs in 1 1.2 innings. 

But then Replogle isn't doing 
what he does best - start, He has 
strictly been a reliever for the 
Brewers. 

"I've always been a starter. I've 
never been a reliever." he said. 

Replogle didnt get off to too 
auspicious of a beginnng in the 
majors He first pitched in Fenway 
Park against the Boston Red Sox. 
He got bombed 

'•What happened was the star- 
ting pitcher got hurt in the first 
inning," he said. "I was sitting in 
the bullpen just relaxing with a 
chew and all of a sudden I was in 
there. I wasn't loosened up and I 
learned real fast about the 
majors." 

WHAT HE HAS learned is that in 
the big leagues he just can't rely on 
the fastball that was getting out 
batters form Washburn, 
Benedictine and Mary mount. 

"You can always get away with 
being a good pitcher at the college 
level but here your concentration 
and knowledge of the hitters plays 
a greater part of the game. You 
can't come here and throw it over 
(the plate)." 

Along with his increased 
awareness of the batters, Replogle 
has developed a slider, a change- 
up and a curve to compliment his 
fastball. A combination he hopes 
will keep him in the majors for a 
long time. 



Doane done in by tennis men 



The K-State tennis team evened 
its season record at 10-10 with a 9-1 
win over Doane College at the 
Washburn Complex Tuesday. The 
netters swept seven singles 
matches and two of three doubles 
matches. 

Singles winners for K-State were 
Jeff Hall, Greg Last, John Cope, 
Matt Westfall, Doug Reinhardt, 
Dave Krizman and Marc Felts. 

The doubles team of Westfall and 
Hall, normally the no. 2 pair, 
moved up to the no. 1 spot Monday 
and took the only loss of the day. 



Cope-Last and Reinhardt-Felts 
picked up the doubles wins. 

The Wildcats will meet Missouri 
Western at 11:00 Thursday at the 
Washburn Complex. Friday they 
take on Cowley County and 
Saturday they meet KU . Both 
matches are at the Washburn 
Complex. 

Even with its current ^00 record, 
the squad doesn't have a good shot 
at a winning season, according to 
Coach Steve Snodgrass. 

"It's looking dim because Jeff 
Hall (no. 1 singles) is going to be 



Campbell's 'cream of crop' 
is newest soup-er in Houston 



NEW YORK (AP)— There were 
no surprises Tuesday, jusl a few 
more instant millionaires as 
running back Earl Campbell led 
the cream of the collegiate crop 
through the draft and into the 
National Football League, 

Gone are the days when a top pro 
pick reserved his praise for the 
coaches and the teammates who 
played an instrumental role in his 
ascension to stardom. Now he 
bestows his thanks upon the man 
who guaranteed lifetime financial 
security. 

"A guy in my position needs a 
guy like Mike Trope to help him 
out. I owe everything to Mike," 



Campbell, the Heisman Trophy 
winner from the University of 
Texas, said after officially 
becoming the Houston Oilers' No. 1 
pick. He didn't mention Darrell 
Royal. 



Front End 
Alignment 

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gone Friday and Saturday to take 
his CPA exams," Snodgrass said. 

He predicted a win against 
Missouri Western, but said Cowley 
County was a good team and that 
KU would be lough to beat because 
of its overall strength. 

Snodgrass said the squad had 
lost three matches by scores of 5-4 
this season, adding that the team 
was only 5-20 last year. 

"We're a lot better than last 
year," Snodgrass said. 



SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 
Royal Prestige Needs 

Students to Supplement 
Summer Work Force 

'200 per week 

For further info come to: 

K-State Union 204 

Wed., May 3-11:30, 1:30, 3:30 



HEWLETT Mm PACKARD 



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LEAVING YOUR CAGE? 

If you have any problems moving out 
of your apartment, contact 
CRB in the SGS Office, 
first floor Union ^ P 
or call 532-6541 




s£a 




7? 

Thursday's 
Expression 

May 4 

K-State Un.ion 
Catskeller 



Thursday's Expression presents an 
enjoyable evening of minority 
poetry, in the K-State Union Cat- 
skeller at 7:30 p.m. on May 4, 1978. 
Poets will be reading Mexican- 
American and Black poetry. Ad- 
mission is free, so come and listen. 



Sponsored by Issues and Ideas 



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Success is a long way up. But after taking the first step, the second one comes 
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12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W#d.,May3,1t7S 



Improved minority relations 
is goal of senate committee 



Improving relations between 
minorities at K State and Student 
Governing Association (SGA) and 
finding ways to involve minority 
students in student government is 
a goal of Student Senate Com- 
munications Committee. 

Mary Faubian, committee 
chairman, said the committee will 
do all it can to try to improve 
relations between minorities and 
student government. 

"We're trying to see why they 
aren't involved now and trying to 
get them more involved," she said. 

Sending senate liasions to 
minority organization meetings 
will help improve com- 
munications, Faubian said. 
Meeting members of minority 
groups through liaisons will also 
help relations, she said. 

"I'm from a very small town. 
I've never lived around black 



people. I need to know their 
motives, I need to know how to 
reach them because as hard as we 
try to understand, there is no way 
we really can," she said. 

FAUBIAN SAID she believed 
more minorities need to be in- 
volved in senate and it should 
make seats available for minority 
students. Senate needs to be 
represented by international 
students, handicapped students 
and ethnic groups, Faubian said. 

"Their voice is needed," she 
said. 

During tentative allocations 
senate had only one voting 
minority present, Faubian said. 

"Hopefully the liasions will 
encourage them (minorities) to 
want to get involved so they will 
have someone to voice their 
opinions and to vote," she said. 



Fieldhouse task force 
to look at sites, funds 



A University fieldhouse task 
force, created by an ad-hoc 
committee to look into the 
feasibilty of a new fieldhouse at K- 
State, will have its first meeting 
today at 9:30 a.m. in the Union 
Council Chambers. 

The task force will discuss 
construction possibilities, finding 
sources and possible sites for the 
fieldhouse, according to Sam 
Brownback, student body 
president. 

Brownback called the task force 
a "coordinating of all interested 
groups." 

MEMBERS of the force 
representing groups interested in 
fieldhouse construction are Brian 
Rassette of the student body, Dan 
Beatty for the University ad- 
ministration, Terry Glasscock for 
the city, Fred Maryanski for the 
faculty, Bones Nay for the athletic 
department and Bernie Butler for 
the alumni. 

"Each individual on this com- 
mittee represents a group that has 
definite input into what this facility 
should house, what its priorities 
should be and how it is to be fun- 
ded," said Brain Rassette, task 
force member. 

Rassette, who was also a 
member of the earlier ad-hoc 
committee that gave a fieldhouse 
presentation to a group of 
University administrators, city 



officials, athletic department 
officials and alumni, said the 
purpose of this meeting is to set 
goals. 

"This is mainly an 
organizational meeting to set our 
goals to figure out what the facility 
should house and how to finance 
it, "he said. 



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Another way to help get 
minorities involved on campus is to 
encourage them to join other 
groups and organizations ' on 
campus, she said. 

"I'm going to extend a personal 
invitation to go to the activities 
carnival and join any group or 
organization to help them get more 
involved so they don't feel 
inhibited," Faubian said. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«J., May 3, 197t 



11 



State forester's research 
earns him national award 



By JANE WINGER 

Collegian Reporter 
Trees are what make Harold 
Gallaher tick. 

Gallaher, K-State and extension 
forester, received the National 
Arbor Day foundation J. Sterling 
Morton award at the Arbor Day 
awards banquet April 22, in 
Nebraska City. 

The Morton award is presented 
to the individual in this nation who 
has made the most significant 
contribution to America's tree 
resources during the past year. 

Last year, 80 cities across the 
nation were awarded lor ef- 
fectively managing tree resources. 
Kansas ranked first with 19 cities 
receiving recognition. 

Gallaher's interest in trees 
stretches back to his roots. He 
grew up in the Ozark country 
where he was constantly exposed 
to trees. After World War II 
Gallaher graduated from the 
University of Missouri School of 
Forestry. 

GALLAHER has been at K State 
since 1951. He became state 
forester in 1956, heading the state 
forestry program and extension 
forestry. Last year the University 
decided to combine all activities 
under one forestry department. 

Gallaher's job interests focus on 
the areas of tree improvement, 
distribution and urban forestry. 

Tree improvement is a long, slow 
process, Gallaher said. 

Trees are planted in an orchard 
and classified by name, strain and 
other characteristics. They are 
continually tested and bred, trying 
to single out the trees which take 
disease, insect and drought 
problems the best. 

"Our primary interest is black 
walnut," Gallaher said. Black 
walnuts are planted, watched for a 
few years and those with the most 
desirable characteristics are 
scattered over the state. 

"We plan to eventually do the 
same thing with trees that the 
agronomy people do with field 
crops," Gallaher said. 

"We will be working with other 
species as time and space is 
available," he said. 

THE FORESTRY department is 
also busy with a tree distribution 
program. Farmers involved in 
conservation planning order trees 
from their county agents and the 
agents in turn give the orders to the 
extension services to fill. Last year 
6,000 tree orders were filled for the 
state. 

"An area that doesn't receive 
enough attention is urban 
forestry," Gallaher said. "We 



encourage towns to use a number 
of species of trees." 
Gallaher's advice stems from an 
experience 30 to 40 years ago when 
the Dutch Elm disease spread 
across the country. Ninety percent 




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of the elm population died and a 
majority of trees planted 100 years 
ago were elms, Gallaher said. 

"We don't want people to make 
the same mistake again." 



Women's Resource Center 

Resource Library 
Referals 
Programs 

SGS OFFICE (Union) 
532-6541 



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Sandal Scandal 

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ACTIVITIES CALENDAR 

MAY 



DIAL MOCHICK 
111 6000 



f •# tfnoi^d +*'«»*"■* 






u 

A 



w 

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DATE 



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WEDNESDAY 31 



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11:30- 1:00 
CLOSED 



11:30- 1:00 
7:00- 9:00 



11:30- 1:00 
CLOSED 



11:30- 1:00 
7:00- 9:00 



11:30- 1:00 
CLOSED 



CLOSED 



1:00-- 5:00 
7:00- 9:00 



11:J0- 1:00 
CLOSED 



11:30- 
7:00- 



1:30 
9:00 



11:30- 1:00 
CLOSED 



GYMNAS. 
ROOM 



WASHBURft 
COMPLEX 



7:30-10:00 



7:30-10:00 



7:00-11:00 



?: 30-10=00 



7:30-10:00 



7:00-10:00 



N 



7:30-10:00 



7:30-10:00 



CLOSED 
'TIL 
FALL 



4:00-7:00 



2:00-7:00 



10:00-12:00 



1:00-7:00 



4:00-7:00 



IM 
DATES 



4:00-7:00 



4:00-7:00 



4:00-7:00 



2:00-7:00 



10:00-12:00 



1:00-7:00 



4:00-7:00 



4:00-7:00 



4:00-7:00 



4:00-7:00 



2:00-5:00 



CLOSED 



CLOSED 



4:00-5:00 



4:00-5:00 



4:00-5:00 



4:00-5:00 



4:00-5:00 



CLOSED 



CLOSED 



4:00-5:00 



4:00-5:00 



4:00-5:00 



AERO. 
DANCE 



r 'tn 



6:30 
FH 



Noon 
FH 



6:30 
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FH 



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Gym fH 
6:30 



6:30 
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FH 



6:30 
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Noon 
FH 



Noon 

Gynf H 
r 6:30 



6:30 

Gym 



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6:30 
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FH 



PROG. 
EXER. 



A0UA 
FIT. 



11:40 
FH 



11:40 

FH 



11:30 
Pools 



7:30 
Pools 



11:40 
FH 



11:30 
Pools 



11:40 
FH 



11:40 

FH 



11:40 
FH 



11:40 
FH 



11:40 
FH 



1:40 
FH 



11:30 

„ 7:3 ° 
Pools 



7:30 
Pools 



11:30 

7:30 

Pools 



7:30 
Pools 

11:30 
Pools 



7:30 
Pools 



11:30 
Pools 



11:30 

7:30 

Pools 



7:30 
Pools 



11:30 

Pools 



7:30 
Pools 



11:30 
Pools 



I 
I 



EXERCISE 

PROGRAMS 

OVER 'TIL 

SUMMER 

SCHOOL 



I 
I 
I 



SCHOOL 



HAPPENINGS SPONSORED BY: 

Believers in the Importance 
of Recreation & Fitness 




Athlete's 
root. 



SHOPPE 

In Aggieville 



InAgglevuie 



14 



KANSAS STATE COUEQIAN, Wsd.May 3, 1978 



Bright future for sun, 
say solar energy fans 

WASHINGTON (API-Solar energy! Everybody's for it; nobody's 
against it. 

It isn't really free and easy, and adopting it in place of oil, gas, coal 
and uranium will be at best a long, costly and uncertain process. 

But solar energy has so much going for it that optimists want an all-out 
drive, on the scale of wartime mobilization, to base the nation's economy 
on energy drawn directly or indirectly from the light and heat of the sun. 

And the worst thing pessimists can say about it is that we can't switch 
to solar energy fast enough. 

DENIS HAYES, who organized "Earth Day" in 1970 to publicize the 
environmental movement and originated the idea of today's "Sun Day" 
demonstrations, is one of the optimists. 

"Federal policy has, in the past, consistently discriminated against 
those forms of energy that represent our brightest hopes," he said. 

"The real leadership is not to be found in Washington," he said, but all 
over the country where companies, local governments and private 
citizens are building, encouraging and inventing new solar projects. 

First lady Rosalynn Carter, Energy Secretary James Schlesinger, the 
president's consumer affairs assistant Esther Peterson, and officials of 
14 agencies proclaimed the government's support of solar energy 
development Tuesday and outlined scores of federal projects. 

But Hayes told them that all this effort still is not enough. 

"Solar supporters hoped to see the direct solar energy budget 
doubled," said Hayes, referring to the Carter administration's budget 
proposals for fiscal 1979. "Instead, it was cut 10 percent.... A far more 
ambitious solar energy program must be designed." 

IN FACT, administration officials say a new emphasis on solar energy 
will emerge in "Phase Two," the next round of national energy policies 
to be tentatively outlined this autumn and proposed to Congress early 
next year. 

At first glance, everything seems to favor solar energy sweeping the 
world— which, in fact, it does every 24 hours as the earth turns. 

The sun's heat can be captured directly from warm air, water or solid 
materials to provide both space heating and hot water for buildings; 
using ingenious heat-exchange devices it can even be turned against 
itself to provide air conditioning. 

Direct solar heat can be used for some industrial and agricultural 
processes, such as drying crops. 

Sunlight can be converted heatlessly, in a millionth of a second, into 
electricity by plates of silicon crystal that look like paper-thin frosted 
glass laced with ribbons of silver. 



Crossword By Eugene Skeffer 



ACROSS 
1 Bird of 

peace 
5 Carpenter's 

tool 
8 Amazon 

estuary 

12 Hebrew 
measure 

13 Work 
diligently 

14 A cheese 

15 Wife of 
Odysseus 

17 Goddess of 
victory 

18 Purpose 

19 Bitter vetch 

20 Allots 

21 Mrs. 
Nixon 

22 Portly 

23 Rages 
26 Fears 

30 Tied 

31 River in 
France 

32 Seed 
covering 

33 Church 
officials 

35 Wander 

36 Knack 



37 Cravat DOWN 

38 Phase 1 Narcotics 

41 Dad's 2 Portent 
refuge 3 Sell 

42 American * Before 
author 5 Baseball 

45 Lake, in Dolomites 
Spain 7 River in 

46 Aquatic England 
birds 8 Enter 

48 Overt 9 Mine 

49 United entrance 

50 Stupefy 19 A roue 

51 Garden 11 Singer Ed 
plots 16 Meadows 

52 Favorite 20 Deface 

53 Comfort 

Avg. solution time: 26 min. 
ICIOISIT 




Answer to yesterday's puzzle. 



21 Five-sided 

figures 

22 Marsh 

23 Thing, in 
law 

24 — et vale 

25 Annoy 

26 Poet's word 

27 Hockey 
great 

28 Narrow 
inlet 

29 Cunning 
31 Carpenter, 

sometimes 

34 Miner's 
quest 

35 Rat, in 
court 

37 Dogma 

38 Sloppy 
eater 

39 Record 

40 Not young 

41 Sand hill, 
in England 

42 Cordage 
fiber 

43 Burden 

44 Serf 

46 Weasel's 
noise 

47 Employ 




Collegian 
Classifieds 



CLASSIFIED RATES 
One day: 20 words or Itst, $1.50, 5 
cents per word over 20; Two days: 
20 words or less, S2.00, 6 cents per 
word over 20; Three days: 20 words 
or lets, 82.25, 10 cents per word 
over 20; Four days: 20 words or lets, 
$2.75, 13 cents per word over 20; 
Five days: 20 words or lets, $3.00, 
1 5 cents per word over 20. 

FOR SALE 

TANDY LEATHER kill, luppll**, Custom leather 
work Special organ welcome Slack powder 
guna, acceesorlee, *uppllee, equipment. Caaa 
knlvea, frontier, western accaaaoriaa. CM 
Town Leather Snap OM Town Mail. (SOtf) 

COINS, STAMPS, military r*llc*. antiques, guna, 
•worda, papar. American*, advertising 
memorabilia Buy. aail. trade. Treasure Chan, 
OM Town Mall. (SOtf) 

BUY -SELL Trade— record*, (ape*, coin*, book*, 
comic*. Playboy*, other magszlnea. 
Coatume* amiable lo rant. Treaaura Ch»*t. 
Agglevllle (SOU) 

NEW— WE hM a ling I* elemant alec I lie 
typewriter with four different pilch**— elite, 
pica, proportional and mlcroeilie. Hull 
Bui I naa* Machlnea, 1212 Mora, Agglevllle 

ti2tm 

USED VW parte— beetle and fa* (back, 
aquarebeck porta up to 1971. Body and 
mechanical Call 1 -494-2384 J&L Bug Service 

pawl 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS programmable 

calculator* AM modal* In slock at low 
discount price*. One year factory warranty. Tl 
SBrSS solid state software and TIM pakatte* 
In stock. Programming assistance available. 
534.5958 (137 199) 

12x03 Esquire, with nice arrangement, two 
bedrooms, fully carpeted, turn la had, central 
air and heat, overhead/tie downs, 10x10 shed, 
778 7092 (140 149) 

SUN HANG-gllder— Ilk* now. Will give lessons 
Call after 5:00 pm I -456-2528. (141-1S0) 

USED GIBSON La* Paul Custom. See al Strings 
n' Things, 814 N. 12th. Agglevllle, 539-2000. 
(144-190) 

14'x90' SCHULT mobile home, 1972. Two 
bedroom*. Includes: lumlture, washer, dryer, 
sliding glass door, kitchen bay window, storm 
windows, double Insulation. Call 5394305 at- 
t«r 8:00pm (144-150) 

PIVC STENORETTE dictating machines, one 
portable slenoretle. miscellaneous ac- 
CMSorie*. Sell to the highest bidder Bids 
close May 8. 1978. Can be seen a I Student 
Financial Assistance, Fairchiid Hall, Room 
104, KSU Call 5324)410. (144-149) 



SIDEWALK SALE 

LUCILLE'S 

in PROGRESS 



SKI BOOTS— Kasllnger Royal Spider, alia 8V>, 
890 Call 776-1904 (148-150) 

10*56 TWO bedroom mobile home, completely 
redecorated. Located on large country lot. 
13.000. 494-2399. 1 148-152) 

12*60 NEW Moon, three bedroom, 1V4 baths, 
air. skirted, Ideal tor students, 83800. 537-2107 
after 6:30 p.m. (144-152) 

1976 CHEVY van, customized, 350 auto, power 
steering, power brakes, cruise, stereo, In- 
spected. 84996 837 2107 liter 8:30 p.m. (144 
152) 

FIAT 1989 850 Spyder. Convertible Need* soma 
work. 539491 7 or 776-3509. (1 48- 1 50) 

1975 CELICA, AMfFM stereo, 29,000 miles, ex- 
cellent condition Make offer Call 537-2497 el 
lor 4:30 (144-152) 



1972 YAMAHA 850x52, 1500 miles on overhaul. 
Runs excellent. Good condition, muat sell, 
..Ceil 5374341 (144 148) 



8x43 MOBILE home, aklrted. washer, shod, on 
lot, good condition, 11400— Cell between 
4:304300 p.m.-T764478. (144-148) 

1970 VOLKSWAGEN Bug Good mechanical 
condition. Good gaa mileage. Dependable. 
AM-FM 8 (rack. Call evening* 537-4338. (144- 
148) 

1972 CORVETTE. Good condition, one owner 
84.900. T utile Creek Trailer Ct. »38, 537-9410. 

(149-151) 

1989 NOVA two door, 307, excellent shape, run* 
great, new tires. 8898 or best otter. Call bet- 
ween 5:30-7 :30pm 539-1483 (145-148) 

12x80 MOBILE home, fully carpeted, except tor 

kitchen, central air and heating. 913-494-2315, 

Walnut Grove Trailer Park. (145-155) 

10x44 STAR mobile home. Two-bedroom, fur- 
nished, will consider contract. 82200 or beel 
reasonable offer Cell 532-5731 before 5O0 
p.m. (144-1501 

BASF (PERFORMANCE), Scotch (Master) end 
Memorex (Mr. 0X2) caaaette* for recording. 
82 45 for C«0. Call Dick, Room 214, 539-5301 
(148-180) 

MAHANT2 RECEIVER Modal 22206 20 watts, 
tour years left on warranty BfC Formula 2 
speakers 15-75 walls. Six years left on warren 
tyCaH Randy. 5384211, Room 525. (147 150) 

1971 hacienda mobile home. Furnished In- 
cludes washer, dryer and air conditioner Ex- 
cellent condition. Reasonably priced. 
Available after final weak. 537-8240. (147 151) 

SCUBA DIVING tank (71.2) regulator, must sell, 
1110. Call 5394211, room 830, aak lor Tim. It 
not In, leave message (147-149) 

1B75 HONDA CVCC automatic, 24,000 mile* 
Super clean, 82400 or beal otter 537-0349 
(147-180) 

NORTH CAMPUS Courts mobile home Really 
nice. At»o 1971 Capri, 2000 cc, 4-speed Best 
oiler 776-41 19 or 5324600. (148-1 55) 

10x55 MOBILE home, skirted, washer, dryer, 
shed Also for sale: sofa bad, mattress and 
box spring*. 7744934. (148-192) 

12x66 MOBILE home, two bedroom For mora In- 
formation call 537-4744. (144152) 

1971 PINTO, automatic, air conditioned, in- 
spected 537-2089 after 5:00 pm (144151) 



LOST 



AT WEST Stadlum-Kaya and key ring Call 539- 
5413. (147-149) 

I HAVE purchased the Bullard Lathee located on 
the weet aide ol Seaton Courts. To the person 
who can produce I he hydraulic motor which 
waa taken Irom one of thee* lathes during the 
week ol April 16, I would gladly buy you one 
I hat you can us* In exchange for this special 
motor or will offer a reward lor It* return Con- 
tact Key Machine Tool, P.O. Box 254, 
wamego, KS 66947. (144150) 

GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY book, Undemanding 
Behavior, In Eiaenhower on Thursday. 532 
5201.(144149) 

SMOKE COLORED eyeglasses in black esse: 
vicinity of Farrell Library. Reward. Call Scott 
537-7127 or 5394701. (144152) 



PERSONAL 



TO THE men ol Kappa Sigma. Mom Johnson 
snd Ralph: I would like lo thank you for all the 
years of honor of being e stardusler and 
sweet heart; for the greel times at Kites Dark 
Horse, Cevaller, Aggie Station and GHya; lor 
the unsurpassed fun I had at rush, basement, 
birthday and mlac parties, lor letting me play 
bepllaer and lata night alarm clocks, and just 
for introducing me to the GREATEST and 
craziest group around. You've become the 
center of my lite and always will be. lis going 
to be hard to leave the "brothers" I love . . . 
Remember me, Janet Noil.(148) 

SHIRLEY, YOU'RE ten years away from un- 
derstanding passion And nothing you can do 
will hurry It. Absolutely nothing Your passion 
will sprout Irom tha rocky soil ol your 
bourgeois mid western prejudices like a tree, 
and some doll ol a doctor or lawyer will pluck 
tha fruit when It'sHoo old lo be good. Wtial a 
tragic waata ol a plain Jane's potential. Noel 
(148) 

LINDA— THANKS for a great time Saturday 
night. We're havin' soma tun. Feel free lo 
borrow my tie anytime. (144) 




—FRIDAY NIGHT— 

Sneak down to Mother's with Greek identif ica Ueo a nd gel In for 

ONLY 50*? 
'OOOOOOOOOOO Weekend Discount* 



TO A bunch of rough guys, two girls in *n old 
truck, and lb* Manhattan police car* in 
Agglevllle Saturday night— Than* for * great 
time and excellent bachelor party) Davy 
Crockett and tha Baby. (148) 

A J -YOUR rosea era still red, your suit was 
blue, the formal waa groat and so are youM 
Thanks. Boo Boo. (148) 

GLENDA, I may be the Sunshine Kid, but you 
always seem to brighten my lire) Friday was 
Isntastlc . . . thank* so very much (148) 

BIRTHDAY BRAT-Happy "S" day. Your* still 
batter then aver and I love It. Love. Your Baby 
(1441 

RON J: la Fred worth a six pack, or will he be 
tri cM sso d l (148) 

GRANT, JUST wanted to thank you again tor the 
wonderful weekend In Wichita. I'm looking 
forward to the popey* you owe me. Take care 
of that one-eared elephant. Innocent JAC. 
(t«4) 

I APOLOGIZE to all those hurt, especially Larry 
and Parry, for the untrue and distasteful prac- 
tical lofce printed in tha Collegian. David B. 
(148) 

TO MY Dlaney c*t: now that I'm not a burr under 
your saddle, lei* be friends. Thanks lor all the 
tun — I've even learned to like Kansas! Have a 
great summer Stayln' Alive 1 (148) 



WANTED 

TO BUY: Playboys. Ptaygtrlt. Penthouse, Oul. 
Gallery and others Comic*, paperbacks . 
coin*, » lamps, ml Maria, antiques. Treasure 
Cheat. Aggievllle-OM Town Mall. (124156) 

TYPING WANTED. H Igheet quality work; editing 
optional; extra-large type available If wanted 
for s pee ch es, visually Impaired. 539-4676, 
5:00+00 p.m. (142-149) 

MOVING TO Calilomta , need someone to drive 
U-Haul track. Call 5374489 after 740 p.m. 
(146-1*9) 

RIDE NEEDED lo Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Will 
share driving and gaa; leaving final week. Call 
John, 5344623. (144150) 

TO BUY; old, cheap, photo enlargar Call 774 
1221. (147-191) 

GOING TO San Francisco area* Would like to 
send two tables, two feet square. Will share 
gas Local resident 537-9471 (144152) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

SUMMER/FALL, females lo share large fur- 
nlshed house, prlvste bedrooms, more. 860 
and up. Most bills paid 1005 Vattier snd 1122 
Vattler. 9344401. (121-150) 

FEMALE TO share comfortable furnished apart 
mant. On* gal <o join two others. Private 
room, air conditioning, 890, utilities paid. Call 
5342643 or 7784710. (140-149) 

ONE FEMALE lo kiln three other* In spacious 
apartment, main floor of large home, lor sum- 
mer. Close to campus. 875. utilities paid Call 
5342663 or 5394329. (140-149) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share Wildcat Innapar- 
tmenl tor aummer. Call Pam, 7764400. (146- 
150) 

FALL: TWO females needed lo share two 
bedroom, two bath, furnished duplex with two 
others SBOMronth includes utilities. Close to 
campus Cell 776-7339 (145-149) 

LIBERAL ROOMMATE wanted. Close lo cam- 
pus, Agglevllle, and park, untitles 
ps(d-*1O0Vmon1h 776-7191 (145-1481 

LOOKING FOR one or two roommates lor aum- 
mer. Private bedroom, uae ol swimming pool. 
Cell 5374033. (145-149) 

PERSON WANTED to share two-bedroom 
mobile home, private bedroom, washer and 
dryer. Fall and spring, flenl 8100 and half 
utilities. Marvin 537-7941. (147-151) 

MALE ROOMMATE needed lor thl* summer to 
share luxury apartment. Approximately 1100 
with utilities 5374125. (147-150) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE needed lo share luxury 
two bedroom apartment for summer. For in- 
formation call 7747161 after 5:00 p.m. 1147 
191) 

MALE/FEMALE vegetarians preferred, but con- 
sider all mellow snd liberal persons. Close to 
campus, park. Summerffall alter 4:00 p.m. Tad, 
537-2396 (147-151) 

MALE ROOMMATE to share nice, fully fur- 
nished two bedroom apartment tor summer. 
Carpeted, central air, dishwasher. Call 537- 

8229(144150) 



FOUND 



IN WEBER Hall: black fold up umbrella Claim In 
Weber 117. (1*4150) 



SUBLEASE 



SUMMER: TWO bedroom luxury apartment 
Close lo campus/Aggievllla Dishwasher, gar- 
bage disposal, laundry facilities, balcony 
Rani negotiable. 537-2194 (134148) 

SPACIOUS TWO bedroom apartment for sum- 
mer— furnished, air. balcony, oil -street 
parking, one block from Ahaarn, rant 
negotiable. Call 532-3831. (144149) 

FOR SUMMER: Two bedroom furnished luxury 
apartment, close lo campus, central sir, dish, 
washer, laundry laclllllea No pets. Call 537 
1218.(144149) 

(Continued on page 15) 



gPllllllllllllllllllf 



MONEY SAVER 



zj 



2 Papa Burgers 

What a burger! Double patties of 100% beef plus a whole 
lot oT other good stuff. Papasitiveiy great! 




Good only al participating 
A4W s listed 

Offer good 
Thru May 7 




FOR ONLY S 1.69 



coupon before ordering Only 1 coupon pa. parry 
This ofter not good wkn any o*w onacouni or coupon 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W»fl\, May 3, 1971 



11 



(Continued from pagt 14) 

FOR JUNE and July , one bedroom good lor two. 
(100 Two bedroom good lor three. 1150 Four 
bedroom. 1200 New campus Call 5370*28 
(142451) 

SUMMER EXTRA large luxury one bedroom 

apartment. Close to campus and Agoievilie 
Balcony, shag, central air Rani negotiable 
Call 5374969 1144 148) 

HOUSE FOUR bedroom, two baths, dial) 
washer, carpeted, lots ol windows, one block 
to campus, very nice. taOOfmonlh, 537-7213 
(144148) 

FURNISHED AND carpeted apartment Good lor 
one three people. Convenient location Call 
7763486. rent negotiable (144-148) 

HOUSE: TWO bedroom, remodeled house 
Three blocks Irom campus Some lutniture 
Off-street parking t200 plus utilities Call 774 
379! or 7764890 (144-148) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT #4, across trom Ahearn 
Nice one bedroom, turnlshod apartment, air 
conditioning, two balconies HSO/month Call 
7764202 (144 148) 

SUMMER— SMALL one bedroom lurmahed 
apartment, air conditioned, encelient location. 
1110/month. all utilities paid 537 7593, (144- 
148) 

JUNE-JULY: lumished two-bedroom apartment 
tor throe on North Manhattan Avenue Air con- 
dllloned. carpeted. Call Tammy 435, Putnam 
Hall (144148) 

FOR SUMMER, three bedroom house, cheap 
enough tor iwo people, large kitchen, good 
location next to creek. Call Prslt, 537-9017 
(147149) 

JUNE-JULY two bedroom tour parson apart 
menl t50 each per month. Utilities paid, air 
conditioned, screened porch, close to cam 
pus Call Mrs. Langham, 53*3934 (147 150) 

ONE BEDROOM — Leawood Apartments. 1837 
College Heights, furnished, air conditioned, 
hall block Irom campus, June Uuly 31. 
couple or two singles 1125/month plus alec 
trlelty Call David, 7741364 or Debbie. 774 
1590.(147-151; 

SUMMER-SUBLEASE luxury two bedroom 
apartment For Inlormetion call 7747161 (147- 

150) 

CALL 7764353, apartment for one or Iwo, elr 

conditioned, good location, rent negotiable. 
check thla one out I (147-149) 

WE'RE DESPERATE: price negotiable for two- 
bedroom apartment. Air conditioned, dish 
washer Great location. Wilt listen 10 any oiler. 
5374565 1147-149) 

JUNE-JULY: 1 Vt bedroom, furnished apartment, 
air conditioned, disposal, shag carpal, three 
Mock* from campus Very reasonable. Call 
5374505.(145-149) 

SUMMER-LARGE one bedroom apart men I, 
furnished, shag, air conditioned, very nice and 
spacious, close to campus- Aggievl lie. must 
sublease, see and make offer. 776-1561. (144 
151) 

SUMMER, THREE bedroom, IVj bath, furnished, 
1978 mobile home. Cable, pool, tennis courts, 
May 20 through mid-August. Good price 537 
8386.(149-152) 

SUMMER: SPACIOUS one bedroom apartment 
II lOrmonlh, available June 1. Call 776-1752 af- 
ter 6:00 p.m. (146-1 56) 

PERFECT SUMMER apartment, two bedroom, 
lumiahed. modernized Swimming, tennis half 
block away. Campus only three blocks. 1417 
Leavenworth, Gold Key apartment. Excellent 
price Rick, 5374036. (1441521 

WANT AN Inexpensive apartment lor summer? 
$125 will gel you furnished apartment, close 
to campus, air conditioned, parking, balcony 
Call 5394963. (148-150) 

JUNE-JULY. 1 Vt bedroom, air conditioned, fully 
furnished, three blocks Irom campus, very 
reasonable 532-3679. (146-152) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT apartment across from 
Aheem Nice, one bedroom, lumiahed. central 
air, two balconies. Up to three people. Early 
occupancy available S13Q/monm. 5374631 
(144150) 

RENT NEGOTIABLE for furnished two-bedroom 
duplex, two baths, dishwasher, air con- 
ditioned, yard, parking Close to campus. Call 
5304963 or 539-4447 (1441 50) 

JUNE -JULY Mont Blue duplex Carpeted, cen- 
tral air, all conveniences Greatly reduced 
rates for summer, reasonable 532-3644 (144 
150) 



MONT BLUE duplex with all conveniences lor 
summer Two bedrooms, Iwo belhs. centre! 
air, close to campus. Negotiable. 5374058. 

(144-148) 

END may July 31, Wildcat inn, Jr., One to three 
persons Across/Abeam. Carpeted, furnished, 
sir conditioned, laundry. 1120 monthly 537 
0252(144 1*8) 

WILDCAT VI -early and late occupancy, across 
Irom lisldhouse. one bedroom apartment, fur- 
nished, central air, laundry, 1130 537 2342 
(145-149) 

TWO BEDROOM apartment, furnished, air con 
dllloned. all electric, dishwasher, half block 
trom campus on Ctellln, two- three persons, 
1120 monthly Call 77441*7 (145-149) 

SUMMER LUXURY two bedroom apart men I 
with dishwasher, central air, carpeting, and 
balcony Across Irom Goodnow Hall 
JlSO/month Call 537-4722. (145-149) 

COOL TWO bedroom lumiahed basement apart- 
ment lor those hot months. Lund In Apart- 
ments, one block west of campus. Price 
negotiable 776-4394 (145-149) 

MUST SUBLEASE-June and July -lumiahed 
Mont Blue apartment. Air conditioning, car- 
pet, close to campus Price negotiable. 537 
2879 or 7764621 (145-149) 

LARGE THREE bedroom apartment 
S225rmonth or ft $75fYnon1h per room. All 
utilities paid, lurnlshediwo wsterbeds, 
screen porch 7743388 (146-150) 

EXTRA NICE! Two bedroom apartment oil or 
Kimball, east ol CICO Park May 22 July 31 
Call 537-0820. rent negotiable (144148) 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom, carpeted apartment. 
Central air. dishwasher Close to campus, 
cable TV Included, negotiable, available May 
22,5374764.(1*8-150) 

LARGE ONE bedroom apartment, air con- 
dllioned. furnished with dishwasher Two to 
three people 1010 Manhattan Ave. Rant 8150. 
call 532-3297 (144150) 

ONE BEDROOM lumished, one block from cam- 
pus. 1100 monthly June and July. All ulllltlas 
paid 776401001 7747570 (147 149) 

ONE BEDROOM, brick apartment. Air con- 
ditioned with carport, two blocks Irom cam- 
pus . Call 5394772 or 778-1 525. (1 44151) 

Low as $120 a Month 

Wildcat Inn Apts. 

For 

June and July 

Summer School 



MAY 22-August 20. Nice, roomy, furnished one 
bedroom apart menl Air conditioned, lota of 
windows, close to campus 1100 monthly and 
electricity Desperate. Becky, 539-2019 (144 
153) 

SPACIOUS: FOUR bedroom house, two bathe, 
two car garage, big yard, nice area, 2301 An- 
derson. Mutt sublease Call 7764479. (146 
152) 

MAY 20, across Irom Ahearn. air conditioned, 
laundry Iwo balconies, one bedroom, 1-3 
people Wildcet Jr . 8130. 5374626 (1 44152) 

MUST SUBLEASE: beaut 1 1 ul, secluded two 
bedroom apartment, large wooden doors open 
onto veranda. 51 25 Call Tim 7743291. (144 
150) 

LUNDIN APARTMENT, furnished. Iwo bedroom, 
one block Irom campus. June-July, 7743775. 
(146-152) 



NOTICES 



MANHATTAN PAWN Shop, 317 S 4th Slreel. 
776 8112 — stereos. 8-tracks, TV'S, 
typewriters, guitars, cameras. 8uy sail trade 
(211) 

CUSTOM MADE 14 kt. gold wadding bands. Win 
dtlre Jewelry, 230 N 3rd. Manhattan (11811) 

STEREO REPAIR— teat, reasonable competent 
repair ol most brands Over 300 replacement 
needles in stock. The Circuit Shop, through 
the Record Store 7741221 (12111) 

ALVAREZ GUITARS oilers you a saving of 
JM 66 on accessories and services when you 
purchase one of their fine acoustics. Your 
local dealer It Strings n Things, 614 N. 12th. 
Aggievllle 539-2009. (144-150) 

FROZEN YOGURT on tap at Daily's Daughter, a 

natural loods restaurant Made only with pure 
wholesome Ingredients 300 N 3rd. Open 
Mon -Sat 11:004:00 7764207 (145-149) 



SERVICES 



RESUMES TYPESET, designed tnd printed by 
professionals gat results 100 impressions 
117 The Oltset Press prints anything. 774 
— 1.31 7 Houston. {2»1, 



SOUPENE'S 
COMPUTER 
ALIGNMENT 



SUMMER EMPLOYMENT -end May through 

September -irucmcombine driven needed 
for custom harvesting Contact Steve 
Schneider. 913-4347225, Lincoln, KS 67466 
(145155) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT— Swimming and 
springboard diving instructors are needed lor 
the KSU Community Physical Act Miles 
Program. All applicants mutt have a current 
WSI certificate and be enrolled lull-lime ihla 
spring or summer. Call 5324242 afternoons. 
(1471511 

LPN'S-RN'S 

3:00 p.m.-l 1:00 p.m. 

11:00-7 :00 a.m. 

shifts 

Full and Part-time 

Positions Available 

Generous Salaries 

Apply in person 

College Hill Skilled 
Nursing Center 

2423 Kimball 
Eq us 1 pportun ily E mployer 

SAMBO'S NEEDS graveyard waitresses— 10:00 
p m to 600 am Call Jell Lips at 5304474. 
(144149) 

VISTA DRIVE In has openings for help in foun- 
tain or grill Start part-lime now and work full 
or part-time this summer Apply In parson. 
(144152) 

TWO HOURS per day to assist with housework, 
five day* per week. 1130 monthly. Must have 
own transportation Females pre (erred 539- 
2747 (144155) 

TAKING NEXT year off? Earn II 2S*week as Llve- 
In Mother's Helper lor a bright 9 year old girl. 
Start September 1. 1978. Write: H. Brody, 79 
Clinton Ave., Westport, Conn. 04880. (144149) 



114 South 5th 



776-8054 



Furnished- 
Air Conditioning 

WE HAVE 
LIMITED AVAILABILITY 

For More Information 
Call 

CELESTE 

539-5001 



FOR SUMMER: one bedroom apartment Air 
conditioned, close to campus. Good for Iwo, 
SI 50 per month. Call Dave 5374475. (144150) 

SUMMER— SUBLET: luxury two bedroom apart- 
ment, lurnlshedrunfurnlshed, air conditioned, 
dishwasher, balcony, laundry facilities, reser- 
ved parking, rent negotiable. 537-1558 
evenings. (144-152) 

LUXURY APARTMENT, sacrificed price, fur- 
nished, two bedroom duplex, washer and 
dryer In apartment, private parking lor four, 
two blocks from campus. 1220 monthly, Mont 
Blue apartment. Phone 778-7338, May paid. 
(144152) 

LUXURY FURNISHED two bedroom, for three. 
Must sacrifice by renting ridiculously low. 
Last twelve days of May free 539-7854 (148- 

150) 

FOR SUMMER: Iwo bedroom Mont Blue apart- 
ment, lumished. air conditioning, laundry, 
free cable, pay electricity only. Rent 
negotiable. 537-4794. (1 441 52) 



RESUMES WRITTEN trom scratch by 
professions! writers. Your resume Is written, 
designed, typeset, printed. 100 copies/625 
537 7868(136-155) 



ATTENTION 



KATER'S DRIVING School taking applications 
now. For Information call Key Inc , Manhattan, 
KS, 5374330.(104155) 



PIANO INSTRUCTION 

Now is the time to schedule piano 
lessons with Kurt Werner. Mr. 
Werner is a graduate of KSU and 
the Manhattan School of Music 
NYC. He has studied with 
Margaret Walker, Charles Strat- 
um, Robert Goldsand and Jeanne 
Dowis. Phone 537-4924. 



HELP WANTED 

WAITRESSES OR welters and bartenders. Call 
5394753 after 12:00 noon (143-150) 

BARTENDER PART lime, evenings. Beckers II, 
Remade Inn Apply In person at Office 525. 
(144-148) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: require hard working 
students Involves bookkeeping, marketing, 
and Inventory. No experience necessary, 
willing 10 relocate. 5374014, after 5*0 p.m 
(144-153) 

WORK-STUDY secretary for SGA General office 
work, good typist. Notary public preferred, or 
be willing to obtain e notary public com- 
mission from the State of Kansas. Average 20 
hours/week. Minimum wage. SGA Is an equal 
op port u nl ty em plpyer . (990). ( 1 46- 1 48) 



FOR RENT 

TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electrics and manuals; 
day, week or month, Buzzelli, 511 Leaven- 
worth, across Irom poet office. Call 776 9 *99. 
(1W) 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS; excellent selection. 
Hull Business Machines. 1212 Moro, 5347931. 
Service most makes ol typewriters Also Vic- 
tor and Olivetti adders 1 1 if) 

ONE. TWO, three bedroom furnished, un- 
furnished apartments tor summer/fall. 10 or 12 
month contracta No pelt. 5374389. (1 19(f) 

LARGE, NICE, lumished apartment. Three 
males Private. Parking. Reasonable. Knotty 
pine walla. Large bedroom, single beds. For 
(all. 7744897.(140-149) 

NOW LEASING luxury studio span men Is One 
block east of campus Available June 1 end 
Auguet 1. Mont Blue Apartments 539-4447. 
(1*4-149) 

NEW THREE bedroom apartments. Un- 
furnished, UOOfmonth plus utilities Air con- 
ditioning, carpet. 5341862. (144-144) 

FOUR BEDROOM house, two story, one Mock 
from camput. For six persons, 175 per person. 
Available June 1st. 53744*8 (144-149) 

ATTRACTIVE HOME in excellent neighborhood 
Four bedrooms, family room, air conditioning, 
carpeting, fenced yard, carport. 8325 
Available May 15 lor family or mature studen- 
ts. 530-6202.(144-149) 

PRIVATE ROOMS, efficiency apartmenta 
available now and June first. Close to cam 
put. 537-2344 or evenlngt 7746638. (144-148) 

TWO BEDROOM, partially lumished apartment, 
two blocks from campus. (225 monthly. Lease 
and deposit. 5343672 (145-149) 

SUMMER— TWO bedroom, lumished, newly 
remodeled basement apartment with private 
entrance. Nice quiet slreel, close to campus, 
park and Aggtevllie. Si 70 plus electricity, 774 
4180 (145 1*9) 

TERRIFIC TWOrthree bedroom home, two 
blocks from University Carpels, dishwasher. 
elr conditioning, drapes, two baths, garage, 
fireplace. Perfect for small family, $275 a mon- 

. th plus ulllltlas Call 539-6965 after 540 p.m. 
(144150) 

LARGE APARTMENT available May 22. 1143. 
Two bedrooms, lull basement, central air, 
refrigerator, stove, carpeting Prairie Glen 
Cooperative Townhou set. 7764675 (144150) 



FOR JUNE and July, near campus, lumished, air 
conditioned, two bedroom, *180fmonth, plus 
part utilities Furnished, targe, three bedroom, 
8200. bills paid. Furnished, large tour 
bedroom. $240. bilitpaM 5344904 (147-155) 

UNFURNISHED NEWLY decorated, tuiiy car- 
peted, two-bedroom, basement apartment. 
Walk to school Range and refrigerator fur- 
nlthed. Heel, water and trash paid. Room for 
two No pais $210 monthly 5394133 or 534- 
3085, even logs (1*7 150) 

UNFURNISHED. TW04EDHOOM duplex with 
basement. Walking distance to campus 
Range and refrigerator furnished. Heat, water, 
and traah paid Room for three No pels $270 
5394133 or 5343086, evenings (1 47-150) 

ONE BEDROOM basement apartment, fur- 
nished. Private entrance, air conditioned. 
Three blocks to campus No pels, deposit, 
tease. Inquire 923 Osage. (147-1 49) 

FOR SUMMER— tall, lumished, air conditioned, 
paneled, one and two bedroom apartments. 
Reasonable terms. 5344904. (1*7 1 55) 

SUMMER: ROOMY one bedroom apartment $50 
a month plus electricity Call Alan 5394211, 
Room 61 7. leave mesaege. (i 44150) 



SUMMER RENTALS 

ROYAL TOWERS 
APTS. 

Two Bedrooms 
$135.00 a month 

Air Conditioning 

All Utilities Paid 

including Cable TV 

Contract June 1 -July 31 

(150.00 Deposit 

Call 53&-8851 or 539-9510 

5:00 p.m.— 7:00 p.m. 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1, luxury two bedroom tur- 
mshed apartment. All appliance*, fireplace, 
carpet, elr. near campus, ample parking. Call 
7743467, 537-4567. (148-192) 

THREE BEDROOM house, furnished, with 
washer/dryer. Close to campus, one year 
lease, available June 1st. 7744870.(144152) 

Furnished/U nf urnished 
Apartments 

•At KSU 

• One to four bedrooms 

• Most bills paid 

Phone 539-8401 



PEANUTS 



by Charles Shultz 



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DOWNSTOWN 



by Tim Downs 



^S0TrlS«EX/Jfts7\ 
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ON mfOOOR! 






UNFURNISHED APARTMENT at 814 Wildcat 

Ridge living room, dining, room, bedroom, kit 
chen, bath. Pay electricity only. 1100 per mon- 
th. Available June 1 Call 7747877 (home) 532. 
8716(aak for Professor Matheme). (144150) 

MAIN FLOOR apartment at 527 Pierre Street: 
Irving room, bedroom, kitchen, bath, front and 
back porches. Pay electricity only. 1149 per 
month. Available June 1. Call 776-7877 (noma) 
5324716 (ask lor Professor Matheme). (146- 
150) ^^ 

PARKVIEW 

Student Housing 

Osage and nth St. 
Near Campus 

Near Aggieville 

• furnished 

e free parking 

• equipped kitchen 

• laundromat 

• $55 and up 

Reserve now for 
summer and fall 
Phone 537^233 

THREE BEDROOM house, hall acre fenced, 
west Manhattan. Available llrst ol June. Prefer 
families. After640p.m. 2434313. (144155) 

ONE BEDROOM furnished apartment with 
oarage. Available August 15th. 1165 monthly, 
plus utilities 410 S. 15th 340 lo 600 p.m. 
(148-150) 



NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 
from $165 

• FREE shuttle service 

to KSU 

* portion of utilities paid 

* adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

Phone 

539-2951 

or see at 

1413 Cambridge Place 



AUGUST 1ST, three story untumlshed house. 
Three baths, 13 rooms Next lo campus. S400 
plus utilities. Contract end deposit. 5374349 
(144155) 

LUXURY DUPLEX, lumished. one year old, three 
large bedrooms, fully carpeted, walk to cam 
pus. modem kitchen. 8325. 537-1 724 (1441 50) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W*d„IUy 3, 1978 



Professional moms combine 
solid control and soft hearts 



ByJUDYWELTSCH 
Collegian Reporter 

"Wanted: Housemother for 57 
wild and crazy guys— must like 
kids, be friendly and enjoy wat- 
ching intramural football games." 

According to Jerry Lilly, adviser 
for Interfraternity Council (IFC), 
five fraternities and four sororities 
are now interviewing for 
housemothers. Alpha Chi Omega 
sorority has already filled its 
housemother position. 

Lilly said the turnover of 
housemothers this year is average. 

"We usually have about a one- 
third turnover (of housemothers) a 
year," he said. 

Lilly and Barb Robe), 
Panhellenic Council adviser, work 
together as a clearing house for the 
housemother applications. 

EACH HOUSE has an in 

terviewing committee which 
chooses its chapter's housemother. 

If Robel and Lilly think an ap- 
plicant is incapable of fulfilling her 
duties, they'll discuss the matter 
with the interviewing committee. 

"I feel morally bound. My job is 
to take care of the Greek system," 
Lilly said. "We're damned if we do 
and damned if we don't." 

Lilly said he receives 
housemother applications 
throughout the year, but they are 
more concentrated in the spring, 
when chapters begin looking for 
new housemothers. 

"We get them (applications) 
from referrals, we get them from 
references and we get them from 
other schools," he said. 

Lilly said he runs ad- 
vertisements for housemothers 
several times a year, in major 
newspapers across the state, 
though houses can locate their own 
applicants. 



Panhellinic and IFC must ap- 
prove all housemother applicants 
who are hired, Lilly said. 

Interested women contact Lilly 
and applications are sent to them. 
When the applcat ions are returned, 
their references are checked. 

After the interviewing com- 
mittees screen the applications 
and show an interest in the ap- 
plicants, the women are asked to 
visit the campus, he said. 

"Five to eight different chapter 
committees will interview with 
them in the same day," Lilly said. 
"The process then, is pretty much 
up to the (interviewing) com- 
mittee." 

THE INTERVIEWING com- 
mittee, if they are interested in an 
applicant, will invite the woman 
for a second interview. 

Lilly said most interviewing 
committees know exactly what 
they are looking for in a 
housemother. 



"Usually, they don't go over one 
or two interviews per person 
( before they hire a housemother) ," 
he said. 

Interviewing committees are 
generally looking for the same 
qualities in a housemother. 

Carol Hahn, presdent of Kappa 
Alpha Theta sorority, said her 
sorority is looking for a woman 
who is friendly, likes kids, is easy 
to get along with and who will get 
involved in house activities. 

Brent Thompson, president of 
Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, 
believes its housemother should be 
active socially and also with the 
various housemother's activities. 

"Primarily, we want a meal 
planner and someone who can live 
within a budget set by the board," 
Thompson said. 

"We want someone who will 
serve us, work with us and advise 
us," he said. 



WHAT A MOUTHFUL OF FUN! 





tor ■ great Mating meal 



And a small price to pay for so much fun! 
(Soft Tacos Not Included) 

offer expires May IT, 1978 



1119MoroSt, 
220 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 



MASS SCHEDULE 

for 
The Feast of the Ascension: 

Wed. 5 p.m. 

ThurS. 12:10 (noon) 
4:00 p.m. 
5:30 p.m. 

At 

St. Isidores 




Men's & Women's Styling 



776-3600 



317 HOUSTON 

Downtown Manhattan — East of Sears 



books of sport . . . 




your favorite sport are 
availabe at the k-state 
union bookstore rxw! 



THE COMPLETE RUNNER by Eds. of Runners World $4.95 

RUNNERS HANDBOOK by Glover & Shephard $3.95 

SIX WEEKS TO A BETTER LEVEL OF TENNIS by Ralston and Tarshis $8.95 

CANOEING from American Red Cross $3.95 

RUNNING FOR HEALTH & BEAUTY by Lance $4.95 

WATCH THE BALL, BEND YOUR KNEES, THAT WILL BE |2«. PLEASE 

Collins $5.95 

SOCCER TECHNIQUES & TACTICS by Trimby $5.95 

GETTING STRONG by Lance $7.95 

FITNESS THE FOOTBALLERS WAY by Walsh & Douglas $2.95 

GEORGIE CLARK, THIRTY YEARS OF RIVER RUNNING by Clark $6.95 

HIGH PEAKS AND CLEAR ROADS by Bridge $4.95 

CANOEING FOR BEGINNERS $2.95 

THE INNER GAME OF TENNIS by Gallwey $7.95 

TEACH YOURSELF TO SWIM DESPITE YOUR FEAR OF WATER by 

Arellano $7.95 

COLGATE'S BASIC SAILING THEORY by Colgate $3.95 

PRACTICAL SAILING by Colgate $4.95 

SAILING FOR BEGINNERS by Toghill $2.95 




k-state union 

bookstore 




MM" 




0301 



KANSAS ST Alt MIT03X< 
fOPEEA, KS bfcb!2 



- » r 



SOCIETY 
EXCH 



> 



'Tolerance competition' 
stiff for K-State's Bell 



Thursday 



By CAROL HOLSTEAD 
Collegian Reporter 

The Miss U.S.A. Pageant was not 
all glamour and smiles, according 
to Diddy Bell, senior in radio-TV 
and 1978 Miss Kansas. 

"I think the pageant lasted too 
long for what we had to ac- 
complish. It was a test of 
tolerance." she said. "They knew 




Diddy Bell 

that if you won, the year you 
reigned would be very similar to 
the pageant, and they wanted to 
see how much you could take." 

Bell went to the Pageant AprU 12 
and returned Monday. The first 
four days she was there she spent 
in New York. 

"All the girls were sizing each 
other up and it made the at- 
mosphere very competitive at 
first," Bell said. 

She said she had no idea what 
was expected of her when she 
arrived. 

"I tried to be the glamour girl in 
the beginning. I wore heavier 
make-up and curled my hair twice 



a day. t was living, eating and 
breathing a beauty pageant," she 
said. 

The feeling among the girls got 
more relaxed as time went on, she 
said, until about a week before the 
pageant. Then the tension started 
up again. 

"The last 10 days were probably 
the most hectic days I've ever had 
in my life," Bell said. 

THE MISS U.S.A. delegates had 
to rehearse from 8 a.m. until noon, 
and from 1 to 5:30 p.m. There were 
additional rehearsals at night. 

Bell said when she first arrived 
at the pageant she was constantly 
suspicious of it being unfair. 

"Once I got there I thought it was 
rigged. I saw some of the girls 
buddying up with people and 
things, but when the 12 semi- 
finalists were picked I knew it 
couldn't be rigged, because of the 
girls who won," Bell said. 

"The more money a girl had, the 
better the image they portrayed of 
themselves, ' ' she said . ' 'This 
would put them at a higher level, 
deflating the other girls' egos 

"Being around the people who 
had more money broke down a 
person's self-confidence, so that 
you weren't yourself by the time 
interviews started. Interviews 
were a crucial part of the pageant 
and you had to build yourself up 
mentally and keep up your 
stamina," Bell said. 

MUCH OF the judging was based 
on the interviews. Each girl was 
interviewed for five minutes by 12 
judges. Bell said the questions 
were sometimes hard and took a 
lot of thought. 

The part of the pageant she 
disliked the most was the swimsuit 
competition, she said. 

"It was a test of composure. The 
judges wanted to see how com- 
posed we could be in a swimsuit," 
(See FLOWER, p. 2) 



May 4, 1978 

Kansas State University, 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 84 No. 149 



Kansas State 

Collegian 

Computerized registration 
punches out 10,000 students 



By CLIFF BERN ATH 
Collegian Reporter 

More than 10,000 students used 
the new computerized registration 
system to pre-enroll for the fall 
semester. 

The use of optical scanning 
forms completed by students and 
advisers eliminated the need for 
the familiar process of pulling 
course cards at Farrell Library. 

"It was easier for the students by 
quite a bit," said Donald Foster, 
director of records. 

"Once you sat down with your 
adviser and decided what you 
needed, it was just a question of 
turning in the form," he said. 

The primary purpose of 
changing to optical scanning forms 
is the elimination of intermediate 
processes between the student's 
selection of courses and the final 
computerized class schedule. 

"It's our feeling that the person 
that is going to do the best job is the 
one it affects. So if the student can 
actually fill out the form in a way 
that makes it the data entry 
document, then it has taken out all 
of those middle steps. What he put 
on the form is what we're going to 
do," Foster said. 

UNDER THE new system, about 
20 percent of the students who pre- 
enrolled received incomplete 
schedules. That number was 
between 10 and 12 percent under 
the old key-punch system. 

"Under the old system, if the 



department had made 
arrangements to teach 300 students 
in a course, the first 300 students 
got in and no one else did," Foster 
said. "Their schedule was com- 
plete but they really didn't get 
what they wanted. They took an 
alternative course. 

"This time we let students 
request what they and their ad- 
visers decided they needed. Then 
we sent those numbers to the 
departments and asked them to 
adjust their offerings to meet those 
demands. In some cases, they were 
able to and in some they were not. 

"That's what caused the extra 
error rate. We expected that to 
happen." 

In anticipation of the high in- 
complete schedule rate, an early 
drop-add session from May 8 
through 12 has been initiated. 

"We knew there would be some 
students who did not get what they 
needed. We wanted to be able to 
have a complete schedule for them 
before they went home at the end of 
the Spring semester. 

"We've instituted this week of 
drop-add so those with improper 
assignments can come in and 
make the changes. By the time 
they leave, their schedules will be 
ready for fall," Foster said. 

FOSTER SAID the system will 
remain the same for at least the 
spring semster next year. During 
that time, forms will be refined and 




Photo by P*te50ul* 

STORY-TIME.-.Telllng stories to children at the Stonehouse day care center can 
be fun as well as a learning process for Brian Sedlacek (right), son of Pat and 
Linda Sedlacek. Becky Benson, senior in early childhood education, is the student 
teacher. { See related story and photos, pages 8 and 9). 



"deans and department heads can 
get a feel for what they really can 
do in terms of adjusting sections." 

Registration for the summer 
semester is not expected to be 
converted to the new system until 
the summer of 1979. Foster said 
there is no real advantage to 
converting for summer 
registration. 

"First of all, the student body is 
only about 5,000. That would be 
only about one-third of what we 
have during the regular semester. 

"Secondly, a normal student's 
load is one or two courses. There's 
no need to try to work out a 
machine generated assignment. 

"Third is the fact that in the 
summer the multiple-section type 
courses are not as prevalent as in 
other semesters. So you just don't 
have the options that require an 
assignment routine." 

The cost of the new system is 
about the same as under the old 
key-punch system. 

"The forms are more expensive 
and the rental (of optical scanning 
equipment) is more expensive, but 
the labor is quite a bit less," Foster 
said. 

Foster expects the cost to go 
down when other offices at the 
University begin to utilize the 
optical scanner. The more it is 
used, the less it will cost each user. 



Arms sales will help 
Israelis, officials say 



WASHINGTON (AP)-The 
nation's leading diplomatic and 
military officials told Congress on 
Wednesday the pending sale of jet 
fighters to Israel, Saudi Arabia and 
Egypt will enhance Israel's 
security, not imperil it. 

Secretary of State Cyrus Vance, 
Defense Secretary Harold Brown 
and Air Force Gen. David Jones, 
acting chairman of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff, called the proposal a step 
toward peace in the Middle East 
and "vitally important" to U.S. 
interests there. 

The trio, testifying before the 
Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee, opened the Carter ad- 
ministration's formal defense of 
the war planes sales. President 
Carter wants to sell 60 F-15 jet 
fighters to Saudi Arabia, 75 F16s 
and 15 F-15s to Israel and 50 less 
sophisticated F-5Es to Egypt. 

Meanwhile. Senate Minority 
Leader Howard Baker (R-Tenn.) 
said he personally approves of the 
most controversial element of the 
sales plan— the sale of the F-15s to 
Saudi Arabia. 

BUT BAKER also said Congress 
may well not go along with the deal 
unless the Carter administration 
compromises on the number and 
mix of the planes, delivery dates 
and restrictions on their use. 

Under parliamentary 

procedures, Congress has 30 days 
to disapprove of an arms sale sent 
to Capitol Hill by a president. If it 
fails to act by May 28 on the 



current proposal, the deal will go 
through. The only way Congress 
can stop the sales is to pass 
resolutions of disapproval in both 
the House and Senate. 

One day earlier, 22 of the 37 
members of the House Inter- 
national Relations Committee had 
introduced a resolution to kill the 
entire sales deal. 

Vance, nonetheless, reiterated 
the administration's view that the 
sales are necessary. 

"These sales will maintain 
essential links that permit us to 
play the fundamental role as a 
mediator between the parties," he 
said. 



Inside 

GOOD MORNING l Mostly 
cloudy and cool with a 
possibility of showers. Highs In 
the 50s. Details, page 3... 

MEATCUTTERS are still 
striking against Stan Mays 
Enterprises alleging that the 
organliatlon refuses to 
negotiate, page 6... 

ACKER SPEAKS out about 
Nichols Gym and Ellis Rain 
sberger, page 5... 

WILY BOB TIMMONS 

brings his KU track squad here 
Saturday and the Wildcats 
are ready, page 10... 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Thur*.. May 4, 1 978 



Flower suit misses award 
for Bell in U.S.A. pageant 



(continued from p. I > 
Bell said. "I felt it was ex- 
ploitation." 

The entire pageant, she said, was 
centered around the media. 

"When the pageant was on TV, 
during commercial breaks people 
would come out from backstage 
and powder our faces," Bell said. 
"We always had to focus on 
something for the camera, like the 
audience or the judges or the 
camera." 

Bell said she was not very 
disappointed by not making the 
semi-finals, but she was more 
disappointed about not winning a 
state costume award. 

Bell's costume, which consisted 
of an umbrella designed to look like 
a sunflower, and a dress designed 
to look like the stem, cost $600. 



A RECENT Associated Press 
story said her costume cost $2,700, 
and the Wichita City Commission 
had refused to pay for it, as her 
parents had asked. 

"My parents just threw out the 
figure, and I knew nothing about it. 
My parents asked for the money to 
help me prepare my wardrobe for 
the trip," she said. 

The reason the money was 
requested was because Bell needed 
an evening gown, a state costume 
and a wardrobe for 17 days. The 
Miss U.S.A. pageant paid her room 
and board, flight expenses and $100 
spending money, she said. 

"My parents had been told by 
last year's Miss Kansas (U.S.A.) 
that the better image you por- 
trayed to the other girls the better 



Rhodes, Hagenmaier 
to fill editor positions 

Paul Rhodes, a junior in journalism and mass communications, was 
chosen editor of the fall Collegian by the Board of Student Publications 

Wednesday. 

Debbie Hagenmaier, a junior in journalism and mass com- 
munications, was chosen editor of the 1879 Royal Purple by the Board. 

Rhodes has worked for the Collegian and Royal Purple staffs and was 
a summer intern for the Phillips County Review. 

Hagenmaier has worked as a reporter for the Collegian and currently 
writes for the Royal Purple. 

Announcements in the Collegian for persons interested in applying for 
the Collegian staff will appear next week. 

Field house task force plans 
5 sessions to study options 



The University field house task 
force will discuss plans for the 
building of a field house in a series 
of five meetings beginning in two 
weeks. 

In the first meeting, task force 
members will consider the use of 
the facility as a sports center, 
including facilities and offices to 
house the intercollegiate athletics. 

A separate meeting will be held 
with persons interested in the use 
of the facility for such things as 
concerts, convocations and 
commencement exercises, 



The task force will discuss plans 
for the design of the field house 
after the considerations of the 
possible uses. 

Funding for the facility will be 
discussed at another meeting. 
State funding, student funding and 
alumni support wili be areas of 
concern, with the possibility of 
involvement by the Manhattan 
community. 

The final meeting will be in- 
volved with the course of political 
action to be taken. 



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you would do. My parents did buy 
me a nice $1 ,700 wardrobe. 

"They were just excited about 
me going to the pageant and 
wanted everyone else to be excited, 
because I was going to represent 
the state," Bell said 



BLOCK & BRIDLE 

Livestock Judging 

Contest 

SATURDAY, MAY 6 

7:30 A.M, 

Weber 107 

Everyone Welcome 








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The Jewelry Boutique . . . solves the 
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Iberia rope loops for 

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Gold filled stick pin ... 4.95. 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thura., May4,1»7o 



r— Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

Shanahan resigns 

TOPEK A— Speculation over who would be the 
next secretary of state for Kansas began im- 
mediately Wednesday after Elwill Shanahan, who 
was in that post the past 12 years, announced she 
was resigning from office effective May 10. 

Gov. Robert Bennett is likely to announce her 
successor before the May 10 date, a spokesman for 
the governor said late Wednesday. 

Shanahan, a Republican, made the surprise 
announcement after increasing speculation that 
she might step down before her four-year term* 
ends in January. 

The tuning of the resignation was important 
because it would give a potential Republican 
successor a jump for the office against 
Democratic opposition in the November general 
election. 

Bennett, a Republican himself, would be ex- 
pected to appoint a fellow party member to the 
post. 

Moslem-U.N. forces clash 

TYRE, Lebanon— "I have never seen a battle so 
confused like it. There was shooting everywhere, 
and everyone was shooting at everyone." 

A French army spokesman Wednesday thus 
described a series of clashes between Moslem 
extremists and U.N. forces in which a Senegalese 
soldier, two French troops and a Palestinian were 
killed. 

In New York, the U.N. Security Council adopted 
a resolution Wednesday deploring attacks on U.N. 
forces in Lebanon, and demanding respect for the 
peacekeepers. 

The council also approved a request by 
Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim to increase the 
interim force from its current 4,000 men to 6,000. In 
approving the additional manpower, the council 
called on Israel to complete its withdrawal from 
southern Lebanon "without any further delay." 

Battleground attracts tourists 

KABUL, Afghanistan— The revolution that 
littered streets with bodies, rubble and the hulks of 
burned-out tanks has become a tourist attraction 
in this old caravan city of bazaars and minarets. 

Where rebel and loyalist soldiers fought to the 
death just six days ago, colorful queues of ordinary 
Afghans shuffle in to the presidential palace for a 
glimpse of the opulent rooms from which 
President Mohammed Daoud ruled the country for 
five years. 

The curious thousands file past troops of the 
Communist-led Revolutionary Council, which last 
week deposed Daoud and killed him, his family 
and many of his supporters, and past the charred 
remains of armored vehicles, now festooned with 
garlands of flowers, eerie reminders of the two 
days of death and destruction. 

Authoritative sources said as many as 10,000 
persons may have been killed, but the casualty toll 
could not be independently confirmed. The rebels 
reported originally that 200 were killed. 

'New 9 used clothes in 

NEW YORK— Those dainty, white lacy dresses 
of the Victorian Age and grandpa's tuxedo shirts 
have been yanked from faded family photos to the 
center of a fashion impulse that champions old 
clothes. 

In New York, well-known department stores like 
Macy's and Abraham & Straus are incorporating 
used clothes departments to compete with the 
second-hand shops popping up all over the city. 

A Los Angeles-based chain called Judy's has 
introduced vintage clothing in its spring line to 47 
boutiques around the Southwest. And in Boston 
and Dallas, secondhand chic has become prime 
merchandise in the trendy shops. 



Local Forecast 

Mostly cloudy and cool through tonight with periods of 
showers and possibly a thundershower. Low tonight in the 
lower 40s. High today in the upper 50s. 



Campus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

UFM BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION Of»n 
nous* and crafts (air will b* noon to 6 p.m.. 
May S and and to a.m. tot p.m. May * at mi 
Thurston. 

SUNFLOWER RUGBY TOURNAMENT will 
be at T utile Croak, below the tub**, all day 
May * and J. 

RAM DASS SPEECH In Lawrence lor 
carpools, call Melody at UFM, 53T5BM. 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS appllcatloni are 
being taken in Justin 107 through May 1]. 

ASK CAMPUS AND BOARD DIRECTOR 
applications are available In the SGS office 
and are due May 3. 

PRIDETTS DRILL TEAM tryouti art In 
Abeam f leldhousa May 1 through May S from 
4 p.m. to* p.m. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS tor tall 

I97« are available In the Panhelltnlc office. 
Holti HOB Deadline for registration It July 
IS. 

AOMECH SENIORS composite pictures will 
be taken at trie photo service, Calvin 
basement, at 3: JO p.m. May 7 and 3. 

TODAY 

SISTERS OF THE SPHINX will meet at the 
Delta Sig house at 7 p.m. 

NONDENOMINATIONAL COMMUNION 
SERVICE will be at Danforth Chapel at 4:30 
p.m. 

PRE NURSING CLUB will meet in Union 
MSA at 4:30 p.m. Dinner at Vista follows 
meeting. 

HOMOPHILE ALLIANCE OF RILEY 
COUNTY will meet at 7 : 30 p.m. tor semester 
party. Call the FONE tor location 

ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING will 
meet In the Union Big 8 room at 4:30 p.m. tor 
elections. 

SOCIAL WORK CLUB will meet in union 
fl»CatA:30p.m, 

CENTER FOR AGING SEMINAR will be In 
the Union Sunflower room at tJ :30 p.m. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION 

w i II meet at Da n f or I h C h a pe I a I * 45 p m 

FTD STUOENT CHAPTER will meet In 
Waters 41 at 7: IS p.m. 

RHOMATES will meet at the AGR houseat 7 

p.m. Attendance Is mandatory. 

SWEETHEARTS OF THE SHIELD AND 
DIAMOND will meet at the PiKA house at 6: IS 
p.m. Attendance Is mandatory. 

NORTHERN FLINT HILLS AUDUBON will 
meel at the UMHE, Den. son Ave., at* :30p.m. 
for potluck dinner. 

PHI KAPTIVS will meet at the Phi Kappa 
Theta house at 7 p.m. 

LATIN AMERICAN CLUB will meet at the 
International Student Center at 3 p.m. for 

elections. 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA will meet in 
Union 20* at S:30 p.m. lor Initiation and 
banquet. 



pre VET CLUB will meet in Dykitra 17S at 
7 p.m. for elections. 

HOME ECONOMICS STUDENTS will meet 
with candidate for the position of assistant 
dean In Justin 249 at * : 30 p.m. 

FRIDAY 
NRM AND FORESTRY CLUBS Will meet at 
Call Hall at J : 30 p.m. tar picnic. 

LITTLE SISTERS OF ATHENA will meat at 

the AK L house att 3 : 40 p.m. to go to Tuttle. 

UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES BOARD will 
meel In the SGS conference room at 11 30 a.m. 

ETA KAPFA MW will meat at Dr. Lenhert's 
formats p.m. tar picnic. 

INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND 
ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS will meet at 
Dr. Lenhert's farm at S p.m. tar picnic. 

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY annual 
spring picnic will be at Tuttle puddle, south of 

the tubes, atSp.m. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL announces the final 
oral defense of the doctoral dissertation of 
Larry Bl urn berg in Holton 102 at 1:30 p.m. 



AIIE will meat at Tuttle Creak, below the 
tubes, at 4 : 30 p.m. for picnic . 

INTER VARSITY CHRISTIAN 

FELLOWSHIP will meet In Union 212 at 7 p.m. 

CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST will 
meet in the Union Big • room at T p.m. 

FONE party will be at Liz's at 1 p.m. Call 
the FONE, S32*SiStor more Information. 



MICH A will meat in tthe Union Little 
Theatre al 7 p.m. for music and dance by 
DORADUS. Admission is free 



SATURDAY 

PI KAPFA PHI LITTLE SISTERS will have 
a car wash at the First National Bank at T p.m. 
Proceeds go tar playground equipment for the 
handicapped. 



BLOCK A BRIDLE Will meet In Weber 107 at 

7:30 p.m. 

KANSAS STATE SPORTS CAR CLUB will 
meet in the Union parking lot at V p.m. tar 

rally. 




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SUNDAY 

Robert Shaw Bruce Dern 
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rCELM HALL 

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In everyone's life there's a 

SUMMER OF 42 



aaaaaaaa a aaaaaaaaaaaa 







—Opinions — 

Article) ipprjrmf on tn» pegr do not noceuarily represent the entut Collegie* 
vtiii or Hit Board oi Jtuaeni Puei.cn. otii 



It's a 



two-way street 

EDITOR'S NOTE ; Ttiu It the tocond port of • two- port editorial On I ho Student Son* to 
municotlont CommitlM'i effort* toward Bettering minority relation* 

Perhaps the first realization Student Senate, various 
campus honorary and service organizations must 
come to is who is the ethnic minority on the K-State 
campus. 

The Office of Admissions and Records can't answer 
that, nor can the Black Student Union, Hispanic 
Student Union, MEChA or the Native American Indian 
Student Body. 

About 4 percent of ethnic minorities with U.S. 
citizenship have made themselves known through 
University registration. Probably about 50 percent of 
ethnic minority students with citizenship are mem- 
bers of the above-stated organizations. 

SO, there are the ones who don't identify themselves 
during registration, and the ones who feel the 
organizations have nothing to offer them. There are 
also the international students to consider, who are 
ethnic minorities without citizenship. 

Campus organizations like the Communications 
Committee, who wish to better minority relations, 
must consider all of these minorities. 

The next step is for ethnic minorities who desire 
better relations to make their desires known. When 
they request whites to attend their events and interact 
with them, they must also be willing to go to white 
students and make a move to interact. 

IT'S a two-way street, and middle-of-the-road 
politics won't get anybody anywhere. 

For the student senator, this editorial proposes that 
you find your minority constituents. You have been 
elected to represent them and you cannot effectively 
represent people you do not know. 

Talk to ethnic students you do know and ask them 
what you can do to increase interaction. Talk to 
students you see on campus; they really aren't all 
alike. 

Go to open social and cultural functions. Set up a 
panel to discuss problems of ethnic minorities or hold 
a weekend retreat for white and ethnic minority 
campus leaders. 

THE POINT IS that there ARE things that can be 
done to at least try and better relations. It doesn't have 
to be stuffed in society's backpocket and sat on and 
flattened— until the problem just doesn't seem so big 
anymore. 

Both groups— white students as one group, and 
ethnic minorities (all-inclusive) as another— must 
make conscious and zealous efforts to get to know one 
another. 

The campus environment is a good environment in 
which to make these efforts, because it gets harder 
and harder to do so in the "real world." 

VELINA HOUSTON 
Editorial Editor 



Kansas State Collegian 

Thursday, May 4, 1878 

THE COLLEGIA* It pubi lifted by Student Publication*. Inc., Kantas Stat* Univenlty, 
duly except Saturdays. Sunday!, holiday* and vacation pari Ma. 

OF f IC E i art in the north wine 0* Kadtla Hall, phone ill 61SS 

SE CON D C L a SS potiaa* Mid ot Manhattan, KMUiHM. PuWkai Ion No. Itt HI . 

SUBSCRIPTION RATH 

til on* calender year; V JO, one Mmeiter. 

THE COLLEGIAN functions In a legally •utonomou* relationship with th* University 
and It wr Itten and od Ited by student* serving t he U n Iyer *l ty com mun Ity . 

Chrl* William*, Editor 
«ar« Tlndle. Advertising Manager 

Donnii Boone, Kay Colt* Managing Editor* 

JeM Anderson, Becky Barllott Now* Editor* 

Ve Una Houiton - Editorial Editor 

Tom Boll - - ■ ■ • Photography Editor 

Barney Parker Sport* Editor 

Kevin Buhner , AMI Sport* Editor 

Baccy Taniw . . ■ ■ Feature* Editor 

Joi.n* hou *»t. Feature* Editor 

Jan* Hlggin*. Lisa Sandmeyor, Kri* Tllson Copy Editor* 

Dave Hughe* ■ City Editor 

Doug Daniel • sc * 6dl,w ' 

Allison Erkelon* • Art* and Entertainment Editor 

Paul Rhode-., Tim Hoc an. Nancy Horit. Jaton Scruff. 

Bill Nedon, Dal* Kellllon, Mary Wood Staff Writer* 




Becky Harriett 



My big men 



Two weeks ago, a column by 
several female Collegian staffers 
entitled "The new Black Book," 
listed attractive men on campus 
and the justifications for doing so. 

To the dismay of many K-State 
women who read "The new Black 
Book" column, 55 percent of the 
names were male Collegian 
staffers and journalism majors 
(who I would be the last to call 
unattractive, but I'm somewhat 
biased). 

This might lead some to believe 
that 55 percent of the attractive 
men on campus can be found 
within the walls of Kedzie Hall. 
Ridiculous. 

And I had to roll my eyes when I 
read that one K-State male's "love 
for life" is "divine." Gag. 

SO, TO relieve the long lines of 
women waiting by advisers' doors 
across campus to change their 
majors to journalism, I will 
dedicate this column to those men 
across the K-State campus who I 
have found to be the Big Men on 
Campus. 

I chose them because they have 
been sincere, honest and helpful to 
me as a K-State student. 

Walt Smith, K-State Union 
director, tops my list of BMOCs. 



Forty ish, sophisticated gray 
beard... ah, if only I was 20 years 
older. , . ( no, this is not going to be a 
sexist column). Seriously, as a 
business director Smith runs a 
tight ship. 

He is knowledgeable about 
stretching the dollar to its fullest 
capacity. In an interview with 
another Big Eight student union 
director for a weekly feature I 
worked on last year, I was told that 
"Smith was one of the best Union 
directors in the country." Enough 
said. 

AND THEN there was Louis 
Douglas, political science 
professor emeritus who is not only 
a nationally known expert among 
his colleagues in political science 
and the Democratic party, hut a 
pure joy to be associated with. 

Although he is over 70, he is one 
of the "youngest" people you will 
ever meet. It's a definite loss to the 
University that he retired. 

Moving to Anderson Hall, 1 find 
two men who have impressed me. 
The first is Daniel Beatty, vice 
president for business affairs. 

Granted, my only contact with 
Beatty has been in trying to in- 
terpret cumbersome financial 
figures on a story I did for the 



Collegian last semester, but he was 
kind enough to spend time with me 
explaining figures so I could write 
a half-way intelligible story. He 
also has the courage to give an 
HONEST evaluation of com- 
plicated University matters. 

AND JUST down the hall from 
Beatty is the office of Vice 
President for Student Affairs, Chet 
Peters. Peters is well-suited for his 
position — he is one University 
administrator who has the 
students' concerns foremost in his 
mind. Peters is the kind of person 
who takes the time to listen to 
student concerns and consider 
each one carefully. 

Back on the Union's ground 
floor, Pat Bosco reigns as "knight 
in shining armor." A former 
student body president and now 
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs, 
Bosco has a knack for clear 
communication. He has vast 
knowledge of this University and 
has rescued confused reporters 
and student senators alike. 

THESE MEN are well-deserving 
of recognition. Their contributions 
to K-State are immeasurable and 
these integrity is something of 
which the University can be proud. 



Letters to the editor 

Leave abortion to free choice 



Editor, 

Too often, abortion has met 
opposition armed with biased 
emotional statements meant to 
sway people rather than to inform 
them. In reality, abortion allows 
women to control their bodily 
functions and their destiny. Many 
who seek abortions are already 
suffering from having too many 
children. They have neither the 
time, money or energy to have 
anymore. In all due respect to toe 
Pope, it is very easy for the Pope to 
encourage large families since he 
himself doesn't have to tend to the 
kids. The guilt aspect is usually 
overplayed. In most cases, the 
people felt relief instead. 

A recent U.N. study has shown 
that abortion is toe most common 
method of birth control in the 
world, whether or not it is legal. 
People will always seek abortions, 
regardless of the law. If done 
legally, abortion can be safer and 
less painful than birth. It's only 



when bigotry and misguided 
allegiance forces women to go to 
the back alley and coat hanger 
people that abortion gets 
dangerous. 

The Bible does not condemn 
abortion. It does not state or imply 
that a fetus is a human being 
anymore than it says that a sperm 
or ovum is a human being. 
Government should stop trying to 
legislate morality. It tried to in toe 




30s with prohibition. It turned out 
to be one of the biggest disasters in 
history. There are some decisions 
that should be left to the individual. 
In a society which prides itself in 
freedom of choice, the option of 
legal abortion should be left open. 

Roger Wilson 
Junior In computer science 

Rock bottom 

Editor, 

You've really hit rock bottom 
this time. The sadistic cartoon 
of a professor who was loading his 
shotgun because his class was too 
big was bad enough, but the May 2 
cartoon of the man who decided to 
leave his pants at home was too 
much. Who are you trying to 
compete with, Playboy? 

Steven Yee 
Sophomore in pre-medicine 



Rebuilding of Nichols likely, 
Acker tells student forum 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurt., May 4,19TB 



By KENT GASTON 
Collegian Reporter 

Nichols will probably be rebuilt, 
unless "something surprising" 
comes out of the current feasibility 
study, says K-State President 
Duane Acker. 

Acker spoke to about 40 students 
in a forum in the Union Catskeller 
Wednesday, answering questions 
concerning Nichols, the athletic 
department and academic affairs. 

"The feasibility study does not 
guarantee the next step," (in 
rebuilding Nichols) Acker said, but 
he doubts that the $45,000 that was 
allotted for the study would be used 
to determine how to tear Nichols 
down. 

The major problem at this point 
is money. 

"The $45,000 carries with it the 
stipulation that one half of the cost 
of reconstruction be covered by 
private funding, and one half by 
the state," Acker said. 

THE COST of reconstruction 
would be $4.5-$5 million, according 
to Acker, and public funds would 
therefore have to total over $2 
million. 

"It's not an easy task, but I think 
it can be done," he said. 

April showers... 

Those flower beds scattered 
across campus didn't grow there 
by accident— they are part of a 
campus beautification program 
initiated by K-State President 
Duane Acker. 

The program is "a little bit more 
of an effort to pick up and clean up, 
as well as show good-looking plant 
materials in strategic locations 
that we feel will be in the public eye 
more," according to Tom 
Shackelford, landscape architect 
and coordinator of the plantings. 

The beds are in eight locations 
and some have annuals planted 
among them to provide color later 
in the year. 

Students in horticulture therapy, 
Shackleford, and Richard Mattson, 
associate professor of horticulture, 
selected the plantings. Donald 
Dudley and Tammy Von Fange, 
grounds florists, were in charge of 
prorogating and starting the 
plants. 

Shackelford said he believes the 
plants can help make the day a 
little better for students. 

"Today, you're parking in a 
parking lot and walking through 
that darned thing— which is a maze 
of cars to start with— and we feel 
that a little bit of flowering 
material will give you a 
psychological boost." 



Possibilities for a rebuilt Nichols 
include housing the art depart- 
ment, an experimental or intimate 
theatre, Endowment Association 
offices and Alumni Association 
offices, he said. 

Acker thought K-State could 
eventually get the funding to 
rebuild Nichols, but "we don't run 
a contract until we can be sure." 

He estimated that the earliest 
date for reconstruction would be 
about six years, if funds could be 
secured in four years. 

Ln response to questions, Acker 
commented on action taken 
recently by the Intercollegiate 
Athletic Council <IAC>, saying the 
council has adopted some "very 
sound principles." 

IN THE past, I AC has attempted 
to determine how much money will 
be spent in each area of every 
sport's budget. For next year, they 
decided to set bottom-line figures 
and allow the coaches to determine 
how the money is spent. 

"The coach is the most in- 
telligent person to make those 
kinds of decisions," Acker said. 




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The incident last fall which 
ended in the resignation of football 
coach Ellis Rainsberger would be 
handled differently if it could be 
done over again, he said. 

"If were to do it over again 
today, we would have taken quick 
action," Acker said. "If we 
couldn't get a written resignation, 
we would have proceeded quickly 
with a firing. We made a grievous 
error in not setting a specific time 
to meet with the press ' ' 

ACKER ALSO mentioned that 
"something very significant" 
happened at the last Board of 
Regents meeting which many 
people aren't aware of. 

Wichita State University 
requested that it be able to offer 
doctorate degrees in Aeronautics 
Engineering and Chemistry, but 
the Board only granted the PhD. 
in Aeronautics, because Wichita is 
the center of Kansas aviation. 

Acker said this was an important 
action for K-State because funding 
would have been diluted even more 
throughout the state if Wichita 
State had been allowed to "get into 
the Ph.D. business." 








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That's right! The Union Bookstore's used 
book program saved K-State students better 
than $250,000.00 this year. That's more than 
$13.60 a student! How did we do it? By using com- 
mon sense. Instead of sending big checks off to 
the publishers for our textbook stock, we prefer 
to put it in your hands in cash when we buy your 
books. It makes sense, the savings add up fast, 
and what's more, we've been doing it for you for 
years As a result, the average student's book ex- 
penses are reduced by about one-f ifth. 

Here are the details: First, we pay 20% more 
for your books than is currently available at 
other dealers. Second, these exceptionally high 
prices attract a lot of books- literally tons of 
them, so our stocks are the largest in Manhattan, 
bar none! (One out of every three course books 
sold at the Umon this year was a used book.) 
With such a high volume of used copies 

k-state union 



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0301 



available, and since you save twice on used 
books (once when you but it, and again when you 
sell it) it is easy to see why the net result is such 
a huge savings. It's a fact that the Union puts 
more cash in the hands of K-State students than 
anybody else in the book business. You couldn t 
save more if you bought all new books at 

wholesale! ... , . 

So why are we buying this ad? Not just to 
blow our own horn. We figure that if you know 
the facts, you can save yourself a lot of money. 
So we bought this ad to convince you that there 
are only two simple steps to save money on your 

textbooks ' 

1. Sell your books at the Union— you save 

because we pay more. 

2 Buy your books at the Union— you save 

because we have more used books. 

So gather up all those books lying around 
the apartment or dorm room, and sell them at 
the Union (in front of Forum Hall) during Final 
Week. Then, come see us again 
during registration. Remember, we save you 
more, and we can prove it. 



KANSAS STATf COLLEGIAN, Thurs, May 4, 1»7t 



Picket lines still up at Dutch Maid 



By CINDY IZZO 
Collegian Reporter 

A strike involving meatcutters, 
employed by Stan Hayes Enter- 
prises, owner of the Dutch Maid 
supermarkets in Manhattan, has 
entered its eighth week. 

According to a statement 
released by the strikers, the 
meatcutters went on strike after 
M,L. Cassell, an employee for the 
Blue Hills Dutch Maid store, was 
dismissed by Stan Hayes Enter- 
prises for working off the clock. 

Cassell was selected by other 
meat department employees to 
serve as that groups bargaining 
agent for the Amalgamated 
Meatcutters and Butcher Work- 
men of North America Local 340. 

"Shortly after I had participated 
in a negotiation meeting, Stan 
Hayes Enterprises dismissed me, 
claiming I had worked off the 
clock," Cassell said. 

He said the Stan Hayes Enter- 
prises told him the reason for his 
dismissal was because, "I was 
straightening some meat packages 
in the meat case while I was not on 
the time clock. I absolutely was not 
working off the clock," Cassell 
said. 

CASSELL SAID the main thing 
the strikers want now is to have the 
dismissed employee re-instated 
and to be able to negotiate for a 
better wage package and a 
retirement program which they 
( the meatcutters) do not have. 

He said the meatcutters in the 
Dutch Maid stores are receiving 
more than $2.00 an hour below the 
union scale in Manhattan com- 
pared with Safeway, a union store. 



"At Safeway, they (the meat- 
cutters), get a new contract this 
month, and they have a definite 
time period in which to receive a 
pay increase," Cassell said. 

Cassell said during the April 10th 
meeting between the union and 
Stan Hayes Enterprises, the union 
asked the company to put himself 
and Dale Finlayson back to work. 

Cassell said Finlayson was 
another meatcutter who had been 
dismissed by the Stan Hayes 
Enterprises. 

"The company refused to allow 
us to return to our jobs," Cassell 
said. 

"As a result of the company's 
attitude at the meeting, the union is 
filing charges against the Stan 
Hayes Enterprises for failure to 
negotiate," he said. 

CASSELL SAID a tentative 
hearing date of Aug. 2 has been set 
by the Labor Relations Board 
concerning the charges of unfair 
labor practices brought against 
Stan Hayes Enterprises. 

Stan Hayes, of Stan Hayes 
Enterprises and owner of the 
Dutch Maid stores at the Blue Hills 
Shopping Plaza, and on Poyntz 
Ave., said his organization has not 
failed to negotiate with the union 
and the meatcutters. 

Hayes said the charges that he 
has failed to show up at negotiation 
meetings are not accurate. 

"We have not refused to 
negotiate," Hayes said. "My 
representative and attorney have 
attended every meeting, and we 
have an attorney to negotiate a 
contract." 



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When asked about the strikers 
charges of Dutch Maid 
management not wanting to 
unionize, Hayes said there are 
union scales for particular con- 
tracts, 

"There is no particular union 
scale for meatcutters across the 
country," Hayes said. "The union 
scale in Manhattan is what 
Safeway's contract would be, not 
necessarily what ours would be." 

HAYES SAID the Dutch Maid 
stores are "not related to Safeway, 
and we wouldn't want the same 
contract that another company 
would have." 

"We fee) we could include things 
more beneficial for our particular 
employees," Hayes said. 

When asked about the dismissal 
of one of the employees, Hayes said 
the "firing didn't come without 
warning concerning the matter." 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurt.,Miy4,1978 



Don't blame the mailman; 
late mall fault of machines 



WASHINGTON (AP)-The use 
of machines instead of humans to 
sort mail is leading to increases in 
the number of letters routed to the 
wrong city and subsequent delays 
in delivery, the Postal Service 
says. 

A Postal Service survey of in- 
tercity mail handled in 30 facilities 
found 2.2 percent of the tetters 
were directed to the wrong 
cities—often to cities in other parts 
of the country, Senior Assistant 
Postmaster General E. V. Dorsey 
has told the Postal Service board. 

"As an example, a letter from 
New York City to Washington 
might wind up in Cleveland. You 
then have to send it from Cleveland 
to Washington. It will be at least 
one day late," he said. 

DORSEY was asked by a board 
member, Robert Hardesty, if there 
were fewer letters sent in the 
wrong direction before 
mechanization replaced much of 
the manual sorting of mail. 



"Oh, yes," Dorsey replied. He 
said the missent rate is higher now 
because "mail used to be sorted 
twice, and that gave you two 
chances to catch errors. Now, you 
only have one shot at it." 

Dorsey said the reasons for 
missent mail include mechanical 
and human errors and improper 
ZIP codes in the addresses. 

Postal Service delivery stan- 
dards call for letters to arrive in 
one, two or three days, depending 
on the distance they must travel. 
The mail agency's statistics show 
that more than 90 percent of letters 
are delivered within the service 
standards, but missent mail is one 
of the main reasons why some 
letters take longer. 

UNDER mechanization, a 
machine brings one letter to a 
position in front of a postal worker. 
The worker has one second to 
punch several digits of the ZIP 
code into a keyboard on the 
machine. If the letter is going to a 



different area, he must punch the 
first three digits, but if the these 
numbers are the same as his area 
he must punch the last two digits. 

The numbers punched tell the 
machine which area of the city or 
which other city the letter should 
go to and the machine puts the 
letter with the mail for that city. 
However, the clerk may punch a 
wrong number, Dorsey said. 
Sometimes, the machine puts the 
letter with the mail for the wrong 
city. 

UNDER the old methods, largely 
abandoned in recent years, letters 
were sorted by clerks who read the 
addresses and put them into cubby 
holes for that area. Then a second 
clerk would make a second sorting 
to break the mail down into 
smaller areas. AD this is now done 
faster by a single worker. 

About 15 percent of the missent 
letters are the result of incorrect 
ZIP codes on the envelope, Dorsey 
said. 



IAC, Nichol's funds slated 
for consideration in Senate 



A bill urging K-State President 
Duane Acker to re-evaluate the 
performance of the Intercollegiate 
Athletic Council (IAC) will be 
considered by Student Senate 
tonight at 7 in the Union Big 8 
Room. 

Tonight's meeting marks the 
final session of senate for this 
semester. 

The IAC re-evaluation bill cites 
confusion and dissatisfaction 
within the council and the 
University that precludes con- 
structive and effective ad- 
ministration of intercollegiate 
athletics at K-State as reasons for 
there-evaluation. 

Other legislation to be con- 
sidered by senate tonight includes 
a bill extending for a year a bill 
that has set aside $10,000 for use in 
the possible renovation of Nichols 
Gym. 

THE BILL cites a need to keep 
the funds on hand until the 
beginning of fiscal year 1979-80 due 



to the interest in Nichols Gym 
shown in the state legislature by its 
approval of a $45,000 recon- 
struction study of the building. 

According to the previous bill, 
the $10,000 allocation would return 
to senate as unallocated funds if 
actual construction on the building 
was not started by the beginning of 
fiscal year 1978-79. 

Senate will also consider con- 
stitutional revisions in the con- 
stitutions of the Engineering 
College Council and in the con- 
stitution of the Architecture and 
Design College Council. 

Senate will consider approving 
members and chairmen to some 
University committees and 
boards. 



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SIONEHCU 



f M- A^o|e2 C ^e 




'He's trying to find out where 

his place is in this world. 
He's finding out what his rights 
are, what he can do by himself, 

what he still needs 
somebody else to help him with. ' 



It's time for a cookie and Brian Sedlacek Is In a nappy mood. 



.now, he needs time to think. 



: 




In 



a moment of tenderness, Brian walks hand-ln-hand with Regan Johnson during outside play at the Stonehouse. 




by Pate Souza 



Brian Sedlacek, age 3, may someday be 
president of the United States. 

"We've got faith in him," said Pat 
Sedlacek, Brian's father. 

But, for now, Brian has a lot of other 
things to be concerned about He is at a 
difficult age, along with 11 other children 
in the Toddler group at the Stonehouse 
day care center. 

"He's trying to find out where his place 
is in this world," said Lou West, super- 
vising teacher of the Stonehouse. "He's 
finding out what his rights are, what he 
can do by himself, what he still needs 
somebody else to help him with." 



A momentary fight with David Munson. 



ABOVE: Brian expresses his anger at another child. BELOW: After 
a quarrel with Jamie Wall, Brian apologizes to Li v Borson. 



"Sometimes he feels like a baby and 
sometimes he feels like the tallest person 
on earth," West said. "And he's going 
through a period of having to sort this 
out" 

Liv Borson, the Toddler's head teacher, 
agrees. 

"I read somewhere that the last half 
year of that two or three year period, 
people have called it the first 
adolescence," Borson said 

SHE FEELS it is a turbulent and 
stressing time for the child. 

"As a teenager, you're going to leave 
childhood and establish yourself as an 
adult," Borson said. "As a three-year-old 
you're going to leave babyhood and 
establish yourself as a pre-schooler." 

Brian really doesn't know what he 
wants to be and that makes it hard on 
him, according to Borson. Every child 
goes through this stage, but some have a 
more difficult time than others. 

Brian is an extreme case, because he 
has such a strong personality. 

"He's going to go through it no matter 
what," Borson said. "So you just have to 
help him." 

Brian also likes to have control of every 
situation, according to his parents. 

"He wants to do everything his own 
way," Pat Sedlacek said. "Sometimes he 
gets belligerent." 

At the Stonehouse, he will sometimes 
throw temper tantrums, screaming and 
hollering after a dispute with one of the 
other children. 

{See FIGHTING, p. 9> 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. ThMra., Hay4,1«l 



Fighting, loving is all part 
of child's 'first adolescence' 



(continued from p. »> 

"It's okay for him to be mad," 
Borson said. "Let him get it out of 
his system. 

"But for him to be screaming 
and pounding like that; that cannot 
be done in the playroom because 
it's upsetting to the other 
children," 

USUALLY THE teachers will 
take him out of the room and help 
him work out the problem there. 

"After he has been there for a 
little while, he'll calm down," 
Borson said. "Then we'll talk " 

And Borson said she believes 
that Brian himself wants the 
teachers to control him. 

"When you help him with 
something like that, he'll fight you 
and fight you," Borson continued. 
"But then you hold him and it's 
almost like he won't let you go." 

West points out that the children 
are not condemned for that 
behavior; but they know it's just 
not acceptable in the playroom, 

"And you would think that the 
child would hate the teacher that 
took him out of the room to talk to 
him after a tantrum," West said. 
"But it's just the opposite. It's just 
so neat," 



Like all children, Brian will grow 
out of this fighting stage. But now, 
his thought processes are not at the 
level of a person who can think of 
alternatives, West said. 

"He's still very egocentric," 
West said. "He doesn't stop and 
think what the other child wants to 
do. It's just, 'Me, what I want.' 
That's just the stage of emotional 
and social development he's in. ' ' 

HOW HIS parents and teachers 
respond to him is a critical part of 
his life. There is one especially 
important factor. 

"If you love him, that's most 
important," said Linda Sedlacek, 
Brian's mother. "Everything else 
falls into place." 

And Brian is an easy child to 
love. He can be very affectionate 
with the teachers and other 
children. 

Janice Buehne, a student teacher 
and senior in early childhood 
education, chose to do her 
semester-long progress report on 
Brian. 

"I picked Brian because he's so 
lovable," she said. "He's just so 
cute." 

He also watches over the 



younger kids and protects them. It 
is not unusual for Brian to hold a 
little girl's hand and walk 
gracefully with her outside. 

He likes to play with the other 
children, Borson said. 

"He's kind of the leader when it 
comes to playing with things," she 
said "He likes to initiate games." 

BUT AT times Brian also likes to 
be by himself, his parents said. 

"Sometimes, Brian will say to 
me, 'It's alright, you can go now. 
I'll play by myself,'" Linda 
Sedlacek said. 

"It all depends on his moods, 
how much rest he has had, how he 
feels," Borson said, "There are so 
many factors involved." 

Recently, Brian has been in- 
teracting with the pre-school group 
at the Stone house, when the two 
groups are outside together. 

"I think he's about ready to leave 
the Toddlers," Buehne said. 

And, beginning next fall, Brian 
will join 17 other children in the 
pre-school group upstairs at the 
Stonehouse 

It's another step in his father's 
dream for Brian someday to be 
president. 



No Eagles for handicapped scouts 



NORTH BRUNSWICK, N.J. 
(AP)— Steven Cerbasi and Frank 
Burrell, Boy Scouts who have 
muscular dystrophy, wanted to be 
Eagle Scouts. So their scoutmaster 
tried to work out a way: instead of 
hikes and endurance tests, they 
took and passed oral tests. 

But the Boy Scouts of America 
then said they can't be Eagle 
Scouts after all— and now the 
national headquarters is adamant 
about denying them the special 
rank. 

"You can't say tell me, when the 
book states show me," spokesman 

Judge resigns 
over 'sex' letter 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. 

(AP)— Judge Charles Galbreath, 
who staved off an attempt to oust 
him after he wrote a graphic letter 
to a sex magazine, said Wednesday 
that he has resigned. 

Galbreath, who serves on the 
state Court of Criminal Appeals, 
said he submitted a letter of 
resignation to Gov. Ray Btanton 
and that Blanton accepted it. 

His letter stipulates he will 
resign from the bench on or before 
Nov. 1, he said, and he hopes to 
leave office much earlier. 

On April 27, the Legislature 
rejected the recommendation of 
the Judicial Standards Com- 
mission that Galbreath be 
removed from office on grounds of 
willful misconduct, willful neglect 
of duty and moral fitness. 



Thomas Dew summed up the rules 
Wednesday at national Boy Scout 
headquarters here, 

DEW SAID it is possible the 
organization will wind up creating 
special badges for handicapped 
teenagers instead— "one of several 
ideas" to revise policy. But even if 
adopted, that won't satisfy the two 
handicapped youths' scoutmaster, 
76-year-old Edward Mattern. 

"Special awards mean nothing. 
They earned an Eagle," Mattern 
said. 

Standard requirements to 
become an Eagle scout include 
planning and making five 10-mile 
hikes and a 20-mile hike. 

But Mattern said Cerbasi and 
Burrell, residents of a special 
Toms River, N.J., home, were 
physically unable to do that kind of 
thing. And they are not the only 
ones about whom protests have 
been lodged. 

MATTERN also wants Eagle 
badges given to the families of two 



other handicapped boys who died 
during a long controversy about 
the awards. 

Meanwhile, several Eagle Scouts 
have written national headuarters 
and said they would turn in their 
badges if the handicapped boys do 
not get awards, Dew said Tuesday. 
But one Eagle Scout with cerebral 
palsy has written saying he is 
against any changes, he added. 

Boys with one degree or another 
of mental or physical handicap 
comprise some 60,000 of the 1,2 
million boys in scouting, according 
to Russell Bufkins, public relations 
director for Boy Scouts of 
America . 

BUFKINS said most of them are 
scattered through regular troops, 
but 813 special units have been set 
up. 

But creating special awards may 
be contrary to policy, Dew said. 

"We have the advice of a com- 
mittee on handicapped that says 
mainline them"— give them a 
normal program, he said. 



All M.E. students ore invited 
to the A.S.M.E. picnic, 

Sunday, May 7th. 

Tickets in Mi. office 



f Outdoor Portraiture 

Jf f? "TheArtofPortraying' 1 

* * by the Professionals 



/fa'/// />/// //> ^/ /r/// /T/// 



The Islamic Association at K.S.U. 

invites the students and faculty 

for a big function on 

Saturday, May 6 r 1978. 

It will be at the K.S.U. Union room 212. 

The speaker, Brother Mohamed Sorori 

from New York is going to speak 
about Muslim duties in this Century. 

Refreshments will be provided 

Sponsored by: 

Islomk Assoc of I.CC of R5.U. 




YOUR 

EDUCATION 

DOESN'T 

STOP 

HERE 



Your education doesn't stop with a baccalaureate degree It begins 
there Once you enter the world of work, you will gain valuable ex 
penence and really discover what it's all about to use what you learned 
tn college 

Take the Air Force for example. As a commissioned officer youll be 
handed executive responsibility on your very first job You'll manage 
people and complex systems Youll be expected to perform well, and 
youll be paid well. too. It's worth working for 

You can get there through the Air Force ROTC program In fact, we 
have a scholarship plan thai will net you $100 a month tax free and 
pay for all tuition, books and lab fees. And that will free you to concen 
(rate on your studies so you can gel well prepared for where you're 
headed. 

Check it out Find out how you can get into a "graduate" program 
like the Air Force It's a great way to serve your countrv, and possibly 
find your formal education extended at Air Force expense as well 
For more information, contact Captain Grenier, 
Military Science Bldg., Room 108, or call him at (913) 
, 532-66M. . 

ROTC 

GotevJoy to a great way or life. 




-llll'IO ROVAI 



1200 Moro 539-34H I 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurv, JMy 4, 1»T» 



Ross pulling out all the stops 
as track team meets Kansas 



By FRANK GARDNER 

Contributing Writer 
Joe Ryan hasn't run a race In two years. He will 
run one Saturday. Lloyd Moon has never run the 
intermediate hurdles. He will Saturday. 

Ryan has been the manager of the K-State track 
team the last two years. He ran the high hurdles for 



Sports 



the 'Cats, but felt he would not improve much more, 
so be retired from competition. 

Moon was a state champion sprinter in high 
school, but has found collegiate competition tough 
He has scored a few points for the Wildcats. 

This Saturday they will go after key points against 
wily Bob Timmons' Kansas Jayhawks at 4 p.m. at 
R.V. Christian track. 

RON NOFS1NGER will compete in the high jump 
and has volunteered for — yep — the intermediate 
hurdles. Nofsinger is a pole vaulter by trade. But he 
will run the hurdles because he was outraged when 
Missouri swept the event in the recent dual meet K- 
State had no one to enter. 

"I feel a little guilty this year about quitting" 



Ryan said. "If I bad stayed with it, I could have 
helped in the hurdles." K-State has had only Willie 
Major in the hurdle events this season. 

"Lloyd Moon is the epitome of the old-time track 
man," said head coach Mike Ross. "He works hard, 
has a great attitude, and is always ready to step in 
and get you some points." Which he did against MU, 
taking a third in the 400 meters and running a leg on 
the winning mile relay. 
KU is heavily favored to win the meet 
Pole vaulters Doug Knauss and Dana Morris are 
healthy. They enjoy an edge over KU's Tad Scales, 
who, some say, doesn't like to compete here. Dan 
Schirer recently beat KU's Paul Titus in the high 
jump at Emporia. 

K-STATE has muscle in the javelin, as well as the 
long and triple jumps. Ray Bradley and Mike 
McGeough could go 1-2 in the shot with KU's best 
Richard Foster, a doubtful starter. 

Ed DeLashmutt recovered from a long bout with a 
virus, will attempt to double in the 800 meter run and 
the 1,500. 

The difficulty in predicting the outcome of this 
meet lies in Timmons' tactics. He has yet to furnish a 
list of KU entries. He can be expected to change 
whatever he does submit on Saturday before the 
meet, for Timmons is the master of the "psyche." 

But, he will not be able to run for his athletes. 



Dale Kellison 



Positive fishing attitude key 



Nothing can be more depressing 
than two people fishing, using the 
same lure in the same spot with 
one catching fish like they were 
going out of style, while the other 
might as well be casting on land. 

1 always knew there must be 
some reason for this phenomenon, 

The Angler 

but until I came across an Outdoor 
Life article last year, the answer 
escaped me. 

The article referred to a Positive 
Fishing Attitude (PFA). 

Attitude can play a large role in 
determining if you're going to have 
fish on the table. 

An example of PFA is a man out 
fishing, using all of his expensive 
gear, and all of the knowledge he 
has acquired over the years, then 
an 11 year-old comes up with a 
Zebco 202 and starts outfishing 
him. 

COMMON SENSE would tell us 
the man should have a tremendous 
advantage over the kid. The reason 
the kid probably did better is that 
kids take the attitude that they're 
going to catch fish, come hell or 
high water. The man might have 
been feeling bad from the night 
before, or because it was cold and 
windy he felt the fish might not be 
biting. There are a thousand other 
reasons which make us think 
negatively about catching fish. 

Whatever the reason, if you go 
with the attitude that you are going 
to catch fish, you have a tendency 
to be more alert, to work lures 
better and to concentrate more on 
what is going on. 

A split second can make the 
difference when setting a hook. 
When fishing with a positive at- 
titude you are often more alert to 
light taps and strikes, allowing you 
to gain that extra split second. 

When working a lure for an hour 



or two without success it becomes 
very easy to start "going through 
the motions" of casting and 
retrieving. Many lures are ef- 
fective only when the fisherman 
puts action into them, by jerks, or 
delays and other motions. 

I HAVE GONE out many times, 
only to be told they weren't biting, 
and come home with a stringer full 
offish. 



On the other hand, I've gone out 
when it was windy, cloudy and cold 
and felt like I wasn't going to catch 
anything, and caught exactly that, 
nothing. Even though I ran into 
people who had been taking fish all 
day. 

So the next time you go fishing 
try to put yourself in the frame of 
mind of the 11 year-old and see if it 
doesn't make a difference. Good 
fishing. 



*•■«■ 




TACO GRANDE 

2114 Tattle Creek Blvd. 
77S48M 

Tacos 4 for M 00 

Burritos & Sanchos 

Good Friday, May 5 
thru Sunday, May 7 

abo available in junction City 



Holmes sent to Tampa; 
K.C's Young goes West 



NEW YORK (AP)-The Pitt 
sburgh Steelers traded defensive 
tackle Ernie Holmes, once an 
integral part of their "Steel Cur- 
tain Line," to Tampa Bay for a 
pair of tow-round draft choices 
Wednesday as the National 
Football League concluded its 
college draft. 

Holmes, who had a couple of 
brushes with the law in recent 
seasons, and who acquired a bit of 



a "flake" image when he got a 
haircut in the shape of an arrow, 
was the biggest name mentioned 
as the seventh through 12th round 
unraveled at the draft. 

To get the six foot three-and-one- 
half inch, 260-pounder, entering his 
seventh pro season, the Buc- 
caneers gave up the lOth-round 
choice they previously had 
acquired from Oakland as well as 
their own nth-round selection. 



MEMORIAL SERVICE 



For Mary Jo King, wife of Ed- 
ward J. King. Services at the 
K.S.U. International Student Cen- 
ter, Mid-Campus Drive and Claflin 
Road. 7 p.m., Friday, May 5, 1978. 

Friends of the International 
Student Center are invited. The 
Center was a gift of the Kings. 

Mrs. King died Wednesday, 
April 26, in Kansas City. 



UQ Styhng by^Ptbfessionals" 

MOD or CONSERVATIVE 

We're open 
Tuesday thru 

Saturday 
8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 





—Appointments preferred— 

WESTIOOP SHOPPING CENTER 

5396001 






NEED A BKAK? 

Pre- Veterinary Club 
Dykstra 175 



May 4 
7:MP.M 





Find Your Way in the Wilderness 

Take a break from the academic grind and learn Orienteering, one of 
three skills taught in the ROTC Summer Program. 
(Course #249-252). 

No military obligation 

Four hours academic credit 
Special tuition provisions 



CHECK IT OUT! 



Call: Glade Presnal, 532-6754 
Or stop by Room 101, 

Military Science Bldg. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tbtif*.,M»y 4,197» 



11 



Athletics faces moral question 



By CINDY COX 
Collegian Reporter 

The K-State athletic department 
faces a moral question in the 
future. Should it continue to cover 
the medical expenses of non- 
scholarship athletes? Or should it 
make these athletes pay for part of 
their own medical bills? 

"Some schools have non- 
scholarship athletes sign a release 
agreement that says that they 
accept responsibility for taking 
care of ther own liability with 
regard to athletic injury," Colbert 
said. 

"K Stall- has had kind of a moral 
obligation" to cover the medical 
expenses of all varsity athletes, 
Colbert said 

"We may, some time in the 
future, have to help ourselves by 
letting people shoulder their part of 
the load or all of it." 

This moral question is just part 



of the total picture of medical 
spending for K -State athletes. 

The athletic department 
budgeted 129,000 for medical ex- 
penses in 1977-78. About $7,000 
more than that has been spent, 
Colbert said. 

IIOWKVKR, MEDICAL ex- 
penses will not exceed the budget 
in the end because of money to be 
received from NCAA medical 
insurance that K-State has for each 
athlete. 

K Slate has a $2,000 deductible 
insurance policy with the NCAA on 
each athlete so the athletic 
department gets back any amount 
over $2,000 spent on an athlete. K 
State should receive about $25,000 
from NCAA insurance which will 
leave a total expenditure of 
approximately $110,000, which is 
$19,000 under the budget . 

About 78 percent of the medical 
budget goes to football. 



Bando and Hisle provoked 
injury collision, Brett claims 



KANSAS CITY, Mo. 

(API— George Brett said from a 
hospital bed Wednesday his violent 
collision with Milwaukee's Tim 
Nordbrook was provoked by Sal 
Bando and Larry Hisle, two of 
Nordbrook's teammates. 

"I wouldn't have gone in so hard 
if those guys hadn't done it so 
deliberately," said Brett, Kansas 
City's all-star third baseman. 

Bando, he said, had crashed into 
Kansas City's Jerry Terrell and 
Hisle had tried to intimidate 
Royals' shortstop Fred Patek in 
similar base running situations in 
their game Saturday night. 

Brett was hospitalized with a 
severely bruised shoulder after 
ramming into Nordbrook trying to 
break up a double play. 

He was expected to be released 
from the hospital Thursday or 
Friday and hoped to return to 
action May 12. But Brewer officials 
say Nordbrook, with apparent 
nerve damage to his knee, may be 
sidelined much longer. 

BRETT, the 1976 American 
League batting champion and a 



vital Ingredient in the Royals' 
team, missed almost two weeks 
last year with an elbow injury and 
is constantly nursing cuts and 
bruises. But he has no intention of 
toning down the aggressive, hard- 
nosed style of play that has become 
his trademark around the 
American League. 

"Next time Timmie is standing 
on the bag and sees me coming at 
him he's going to be a little leery, 
and that's the message I want to 
get across," Brett said. "That's 
what I want. I want them to think 
I'm going to kill them. 



Front End 
Alignment 

SOUPENE'S 



U4S.5th 



776-8054 




Doradus presents 

music and dance 

of Spain 

May 5 at 7 p.m. in the Union Little Theatre 

no charge sponsored by MECHA 



Even though medical expenses 
are not a major part of the $2.2 
million budget for the athletic 
department, Colbert said he would 
like to see the costs cut down. He 
said money is not wasted on 
medical expenses as far as sup- 
plies and equipment is concerned. 

"The trainers, Porky Morgan 
and Jim Rudd, never relinquish 
their right to make sure they're 
geetting the most out of the 
money." 

COLBERT IS in the process of 



formulating one way to cut 
medical spending. Many college 
students are covered by their 
parent '5 insurance while they are 
in school. In a common group plan, 
a child can be covered until he 
reaches age 25 or gets married. 



Iff U:M»t night. . 

I'm STARVING 

Where can I go eat? 

Answer pg. 3 



HEWLETT 



tk 



PACKARD 



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Services Not Available At Starred Locations 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thur*„ May 4, 1970 




OPENING SOON 
Aggie Hair Port 

711 N. 11th 

owned by Dee Bailey 

formerly from the Hair Shack 

Check Collegia n for opening date 



1 



THEHOMOPHILE 

ALLIANCE OF RILEY 

COUNTY (HARC) 

Is having a "Semesters End Party" 
along with their regular business 
meeting, Thursday 7:30 p.m. Call 
the FONE at 5.12-6565 for the 
location. 



How does it vvork? 

Darlene Pashkowski, an employee at the Union book store, took time out Wed- 
nesday to Inspect one of the solar heating devices on display in the Union cour- 
tyard. The display was part of the observance of National Sun Day. 

Follies: Greeks' closing encounter 



HORSE 

CENTS 
NIGHT 



Pitchers M.00 7-8 
Pitchers $ 1.25 8-9 
Pitchers M.75 9-12 

25' Admission 



ByJUDYWELTSCH 
Collegian Reporter 

"Close Encounters with the 
Greek Kind," may seem a little out 
of orbit, but it's just the theme for 
this year's Greek Follies. 

The finale to K-State's Greek 
Week, Greek Follies, will begin at 
7:30 p.m. Saturday in McCain 
Auditorium. 

Five groups, each consisting of 
four fraternities and two sororities, 
will compete against each other by 
putting on 20-minute shows. Each 
group must incorporate the theme 
into their show. 

WORK FOR Greek Follies began 
in February when Anne Lacy, and 
Larry Frank, junior in landscape 
architecture co-chairmen of the 
Follies, randomly picked the 

Schneider placed 
at accident scene 

TOPEKA (AP)-A former ad- 
ministrative assistant to Attorney 
General Curt Schneider has given 
a signed statement to The 
Associated Press placing 
Schneider at the scene of an 
automobile accident in Topeka last 
summer. Schneider denied causing 
or being at the scene of the ac- 
cident. 

James Halsig, 31, who now lives 
in Wichita, did not witness the 
accident. But he said Schneider 
called him late at night, told him 
the accident had occurred and 
asked him to go help the driver of 
the damaged car. 

Halsig also quoted Schneider as 
asking him the next day, "How is 
Chappaquidick this morning?" 

Mary Hanfelt, who resigned as 
Schneider's secretary last fall, 
confirmed hearing Schneider ask 
that question. 

As attorney general, the 34-year- 
old Schneider is the highest 
ranking Democratic office holder 
in Kansas He had been considered 
a top candidate to bid for his 
party's nomination for governor 
this year. 



sororities and fraternities which 
would work together. 

"Then we set deadlines for script 
ideas and then for the scripts," 
Frank said. 

"They (the groups) wrote the 
scripts themselves with original 
lyrics to songs," he said. Popular 
songs are also being used. 

Performing between the acts will 
be Not Ready for K -State Players, 
with Lacy as master of ceremonies 
for Greek Follies. 

Lacy said as a whole, she expects 
Greek Follies to be better this year 
than ever. Pressure has been put 
on the groups to do a better job, she 
said. 

"I've been really impressed with 
the groups," Lacy said. "The 
groups seem to be much more 
enthusiastic and more involved 
this year. They are more organized 
than last year." 



WHILE LACY attributes the 
better program to the pressure, 
she also thinks a group from the 
Greek Week committee, along with 
Lacy and Frank who have visited 
the groups, have helped them by 
answering questions on and 
making suggestions. 

"I've gone around with about 
four other people giving advice if 
they need it and to see if things are 
running smoothly," she said. 

"Anne and I have worked really 
hard to make it (Greek Follies) the 
best ever," Frank said. 



JUAREZ 

TEQUILA 

urc...ntnnii-iH(! 




ZSff+BHrt 



w • 



5ft* 



SBfi 1 



GOLD OR SILVER 

*PraTTO>ftBU[ILU>(fY 

imMAJNJHMA ST. ifiu&io.wnoof 



READY TO SELL YOUR BOOKS? 

We are buying between 
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Thursday, May 4 

Friday, May 5 

Saturday, May 6 

Remember this at 





Thursday's 
Expression 

May 4 

K-State Union 
Catskeller 



Thursday's Expression presents an 
enjoyable evening of minority 
poetry, in the K-State Union Cat- 
skeller at 7:30 p.m. on May 4, 1978. 
Poets will be reading Mexican- 
American and Black poetry. Ad- 
mission is free, so come and listen. 



Sponsored by Issues and Ideas 





KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurs-May 4, 1978 



IS 



Carter fuels study 
for solar energy 

GOLDEN, Colo. (AP)- 
\President Carter marked 
*"Sun Day" Wednesday by ordering 
a new Cabinet-level study to 
develop a national solar strategy 
and by praising solar energy as a 
potential counterweight to rising 
oil prices. 

In remarks prepared for 
delivery at the Solar Energy 
Research Institute here, however, 
Carter didn't promise any new 
funds for solar research. But the 
president noted that his proposed 
budget for fiscal 1979 contains a 64 
percent increase in money for 
development of solar power over 
the federal budget of two years 
ago. 

On the first day of a three-day 
swing through Colorado, 
California, Oregon and 
Washington, Carter announced 
that the Agriculture Department 
will lend $14 million to the city of 
Lamar, Colo., for a project to turn 
livestock excrement into methane 
gas. 

CARTER HAD had lost all four 
states to Gerald Ford in the 1976 
election, and his Western tour was 
billed by the White House as an 
effort to win public support for 
administration programs. 

"Nobody can embargo 
sunlight," the president told his 
audience at the research center, a 
federally financed project 
operated for the Department of 
Energy by the private, nonprofit 
Midwest Research Institute of 
Kansas City. 

"No cartel controls the sun," 
Carter said in an apparent 
reference to the Arab oil embargo 
of 1973-74. "Its energy will not run 
out. It will not pollute our air or 
poison our waters. It is free from 
stench and smog. The sun's power 
needs only to be collected, stored 
and used. 

"The question is no longer 
' whether solar energy works," he 
added. "We know it works. The 
only question is how to cut costs so 
that solar power can be used more 
widely and set a cap on rising oil 
prices." 

Carter said his energy plan, still 
stalled in Congress, would increase 
use of home solar systems by of- 
fering more than $500 million in tax 
credits— up to $2,000 for each 
homeowner— over the next seven 
years. 

Mondale warns 
Phillipine leader 

MANILA, Philippines 

<AP)— Vice President Walter 
Mondale gave Philippine President 
Ferdinand Marcos a pointed 
message Wednesday— improve his 
martial-law government's record 
on human rights or face continued 
friction with the United States and 
loss of American popular support. 

Mondale also met with a half- 
dozen anti-Marcos dissidents, and 
one of them, former Foreign 
Minister Salvador Lopez, said 
afterward he was satisfied the 
American was not here "on a 
pleasure trip." 

"He made it clear his visit is 
linked to the policy of human 
rights," Lopez said. 

It was the first full day of 
Mondale'5 five-nation Far East 
swing, aimed at demonstrating 
U.S. commitment to the region. 

He travels to Bangkok Thursday 
for talks with Thai leaders that are 
expected to center on the fate of 
100,000 Indochinese refugees in 
their country, rampant narcotics 
trafficking and the defense needs 
of non-Communist Southeast Asia. 
Mondale then goes to Indonesia, 
Australia and New Zealand before 
heading home. 

In what he called a "candid" 90- 
minute discussion with Marcos, 
Mondale brought up the subject of 
political prisoners. 




Buy-Back 



Here 
are some 

answers to 
often asked questions. 




Question: 
Answer: 



How does ttw Union Bookstore determine how much your 
books are worth when you sell them back? 

If the Bookstore has notification from the instructor that the 
books are to be re-adopted for use the next semester, and If the 
Bookstore does not already have a sufficient stock on hand, then 
you will be offered 60 per cent of the publisher's current list price. 

For example: if a book sells for $10.00 new and it meets the 
requirements noted above, the book would be bought from you for 
$6.00. 

If the Bookstore has not received notice that the book will be 
used again, or If it already has a sufficient stock on hand, the book 
would be worth the current wholesale price as indicated by one of 
the nation's largest jobbers of used textbooks. 

If you have any questions about the price being paid for a text- 
book, the buyer will be happy to answer any questions which you 
may have regarding the price paid. 



Question: 
Answer: 



la 60 per cent the usual price paid 
for textbooks around the country? 

Definitely not. Most stores in the United States pay only 50 per 
cent for books being used again. The Union Bookstore is one of the 
few stores which pays 60 per cent. And remember, we pay cash. You 
don't have to take your money out in trade. 




nil 



# What about paperbacks? Does the 
»• 60 per cent policy apply to them too? 



Answer 



Yes. The Union Bookstore does not penalize you on paper- 
backs. If they are being used again, and If the bookstore needs 
them, you will receive 60 per cent of the publisher's list price. 



If the publlaher'a price has gone up since I bought my books, 
will I receive the benefit of that price Increase? 



Question: 

A v% ntfttf** Yes For instance > li vou bought your book for $9.00 and the 

jHL JJL& WW CX • publisher's list price is now $10.00. you will get $6.00, not $5.40. 




We will buy books: 



TUESDAY, May 9 1 

thru ,_ I — 8am to 5pm 

FRIDAY, May 12 

SATURDAY,Mayl3 10am to 4pm 



MONDAY, May15— _ 

thXU I — 8am to 5pm 

FRIDAY, May 19 



Ik-state union 

J bookstore 



0301 



14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurs., May 4, U7S 



liquor bid faces 
defenses, attacks 

TOPEKA (AP)-Under a plan 
authored by the attorney general's 
office, attorneys for the state will 
both attack and defend the con- 
troversial new law authorizing the 
serving of liquor in restaurants. 

John Martin, first assistant 
attorney general, said Tuesday it is 
possible that the case could be 
before the Kansas Supreme Court 
in September, with a decision the 
following month. 

This would be about one month 
before the November election, 
when the legislature intended 
county voters to go to the polls to 
decide whether to authorize con- 
sumption of liquor in restaurants. 
The authorization would be on a 
county -by -county basis. 

It is envisioned that the attorney 
general's office would file suit 
against the Alcohol Beverage 
Control Division. 

Attorney General Curt 
Schneider's office would argue that 
the new law in unconstitutional 
because it violates the Kansas 
Constitution's prohibition against 
the "open saloon." 

Should a court test come about, 
lawyers for the Department of 
Revenue probably would represent 
the ABC and defend the new law, 
Martin said. 

The new law was enacted by the 
legislature April 6. Gov. Robert 
Bennett allowed the bill to become 
law without his signature. 

Schneider issued an opinion two 
weeks ago saying that the new law 
was unconstitutional. 

Under the new law, restaurants 
which can maintain at least 50 
percent of their gross sales from 
food would be allowed to serve 
liquor with the meal. 



Collegian 
Classifieds 

CLASSIFIED RATES 

On* day: 20 word* or tots, $1 .50, 5 
cents par word over 20; Two days: 
20 words or toss, $2.00, 1 cants par 
word over 20; Thro* days: 20 word* 
or teas, $2.25, 10 cools par word 
over 20; Four days: 20 words or tots, 
$275, 13 conta par word over 20; 
Five days: 20 word* or toss, $3.00, 
1 5 cants par word over 20. 

Clatelfied* era payable in advance unlees 
client ha* an established eccount with Student 
Publication*. 

Deadline f* 10 am. day before publication. 10 
em. Friday for Monday paper . . 

Item* found ON CAMPUS cen'be advartleed 
FREE lor a parted not exceeding three day*. 
They can be pieced at Kedll* 103 or by calling 
9324966. 



DMlMf CiMlMpI I . 

One day: »2 00 pet Inch; Three dey*:t 145 per 
inch, Fiva day*: 11 SO par Inch; Tan day*: 11. 80 
par inch (Deadline ii S p.m 2 day* before 
publication.) 

Claaaillad advertising la available only to 
thoee who do not discriminate on lha baal* or 
raca, color, religion, national origin, tan or an. 



FOR SALE 



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work. Special order* erelcome. Black powder 
guna, accessories, supplies, equipment. Caaa 
knlvee. trontlar, waatam aoceeaoriee. Old 
Town Laathar Shop. Old Town Mall. (80(f) 

COINS, STAMPS, military relic*, antiques, guns, 
•word*, paper, Americana, edvertlelng 
memorabilia. Buy, tall. trade. Treeeure Cheat, 
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BUY -SELL -Trade-recorda, tapai, colnt, book*, 
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Wesherrdryer. 5324601. 778-41 19,(1 49- 158) 



Crossword By Eugene Sbeffer 



ACROSS 

1 Store 
5 Spoiled 
8 — Sunday 

12 Wail loudly 

13 Female 
sheep 

14 Continent 

15 Plane 
surface 

16 Racketeer 
18 Ramp on a 

pier 

20 On reserve 

21 Vase with 
a pedestal 

22 Light-Horse 
Harry 

23 Famed pilot: 
-Post 

2» Containers 
for 
documents 

30 Air hero 

31 Container 

32 As well 

33 Electrical 
circuit 
element 

36 Harsh cries 

38 Sphere 

39 Owing 

40 Plowed land 



43 Mobsters' 

conflict 
47 Farm 

equipment 
49 Rant 
St This (Sp.) 

51 Unit 

52 Preludes to 
holidays 

53 Ruminant 
mammal 

54 Certain 
vote 

55 Trial 
DOWN 

1 Kind of 
rug 
Avg. solution 



2 An hour, in 
Madrid 

3 Man's name 

4 Pestilence 

5 Commenced 

I Out of town 

7 Lair 

8 Went by 

9 City in 
Italy 

10 Fabricated 
a story 

II Horse 
17 Scottish 

Highlander 
19 Bent to 
one side 
time: 23min. 




Answer to yesterday's puzzle. 
IT 



22 Smoked 
salmon 

23 Conflict 

24 Decorate 
a cake 

25 Meadow 

26 On behalf of 

27 Greek letter 
28 Rob-: a 

cocktail 
29 Distress 

signal 
31 Start for 

tailor sled 

34 Old man 
(slang) 

35 Snare 

36 Small 
bread roll 

37 Feel sorry 
about 

39 V.P, under 
Coolidge 

40 Matured 

41 Demolish 

42 Poker stake 

43 Vanished 

44 Undulate 

45 Wide streets 
(abbr.) 

46 Remainder 
48 Actress 

Myrna 




USED VW parte-beelie and lastback, 
•ouareback parte up In 1971. Body and 
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discount price* One year factory warranty. Tl 
5690 solid atala software and TI-59 peketle* 
In (lock. Programming eulilance *val!*ble. 
5394964. (13M90) 

12x80 Esquire, with nice arrangement, two 
bedr oom *, fully carpeted, tumlthed. central 
ak and heet. overhead/tie down*, 10x10 shed, 
778-7082. (140- 1491 

SUN HANQ-gllder— Hke new. Wilt give i***on» 
CallafterSOOpm. 1-468-2528.(141 150) 

USED GIBSON Lea Paul Cuatorn. See at Siring* 
n' Thing*, 614 N. 12m, Aggleville. 539-2009. 
(144-190, 

14'x80* SCHULT mobile home. 1972. Two 
bedroom* include*: furniture, waaher, dryer, 
eliding glaa* door, kitchen bey window, atorm 
window*, double intuistlon Call 5394306 af- 
ter 8^00 p.m. (1 44- 1 SO) 

FIVE STENORCTTE dictating machlnaa, one 
portable etenorette, mlscellanaoua ac 
ceasorie* Sail to the highest bidder. Bid* 
ay 8. 1978 Can be eeen at Student 



104. KSU. CaN 532-6420. (144-140) 

1972 CORVETTE. Good condition, one owner. 
•4900, Tultle Creek Trailer Ct. 836 937-0410 
(145-151) 

1969 NOVA two door, 307, excellent *hape, rune 
great, new lire*. f69S or beet offer. Call bet- 
ween 5:30-7:30 pin. 539-1883 (146-149) 

12x60 MOBILE home, fully carpeted, except tor 
kitchen, central air and heating. 913-494-2315, 
Walnut G rove Trailer Park. (1 49- 1 56) 

10x44 STAR mobile home. Two-bedroom, fur 
nlehed, will conekter contract. S2200 or beet 
reasonable otter. Call 5325731 belore 500 

p.m (144150) 

BASF (PERFORMANCE). Scotch iMaater) and 
Memorax (Mr. OX2) caeeette* for recording. 
•2.45 for C-90 Call Dick, Room 214, 539-5301 
(148-150) 

MARANTZ RECEIVER Model 2220B 20 watte, 
four yean left on warranty. BIC Formula 2 
•peaker* 19-79 watt*. Six year* left on warran- 
ty. Call Randy, 5398211, Room 929. (147-150) 

1971 HACIENDA mobile home. Fumlahed. In- 
clude* waaher, dryer and air conditioner. Ex- 
cellent condition. Reasonably priced. 
Available alter final week. 937-8240. (147-191) 

SCUBA DIVING tank |7i.2) regulator, mutt tell, 
91 10. Call 539-6211. room 830, aak lor Tim If 
not In, leave moeaage. (147-146) 



1975 HONDA CVCC automatic. 24,000 mile* 
Super clean, 12,800 or beet otter. 5374349 
(147-190) 

NORTH CAMPUS Court* mobile home. Realty 
nice. Alto 1971 Capri. 2000 CC, 4-apeed Best 
Otter. 77*4119or 532-8600. (146-155) 

10x66 MOBILE home, skirled, washer, dryer, 
■had. Alto lor sal*: sols bed, mattress and 
box springs 7744934. (148-152) 

12x86 MOBILE home, iwo bedroom. For more In- 
formation call 537-4744. (146-1 92) 

1971 PINTO, automatic, air conditioned, in- 
spected 537 2069 after SflO p.m (148-151) 

SKI BOOTS— Kaetlnger Royal Spider, size BV», 

650 Call 774 1 904. (1 44 1 50) 

10x99 TWO bedroom mobile home, completely 
redecorated. Located on large country lot. 
63.000 494-2399. (146-152) 

12x60 NEW Moon, three bedroom. 1vt bathe, 
air, tklrted. Id eel tor students, 63800. 537-2107 
ettar 6.30 p.m. (149-152) 

1976 CHEVY ran, customized, 350 auto, power 
steering, power brake*, cruise, stereo, in- 
spected, 14995. 937-2107 after 8:30 p.m (14S 
192) 

FIAT 1969 650 Spy tier Convertible Needs some 
work. 939*91 7 or 7763909. (144150) 

1675 CELtCA, AMIFM stereo. 29,000 miles, ex- 
cel ten I condition. Make oiler. Call 537-2897 a! 
ter 4:30. 1 146- 152) 

WEDDING DRESS, organza and lace 1100, veil 
625. Both worn once. 9374444. (149-150) 

WOMEN'S LO-SPEED Peugeot, 27" frame with 
all accessories, good condition. 776-1743. 
(149-151) 

1974 CHEVY 112 Ion, power steering, power 
brake*, air, 350, automatic, tilt, mag*. C.B., 
header*, toolbox. AM FM B-track, 63390 or 
meke an of far. Call 776-3658. (1 49-1 51) 

1988 CHEVY Nova, 6 cylinder automatic, two 
door, 9429. Call 532-8203 weekdays 8:00 am 
lo 5.-00 p.m Evenings, call 469-2570 Riley 
(149153) 

TYPEWRITER, 1977, hardly u*ed electric por- 
table, 6175. Call altar 9:30 p.m. 7755020 (149- 
150) 

1973 PINTO station wagon, electronic Ignition, 
all new: cerburetor, tires, a ■ haul I. very good 
condition, reasonable. 1987 Dodge pick-up. 
6250 536-5058. (149-193) 

12x69 VAN Dyka mobile home. 1989. with ap 
pllance*. elr conditioning Skirted, with utility 
shed. Good condition, good location 539- 
1235 1149-153) 



SIDEWALK SALE 

LUCILLE'S 
in PROGRESS 



TURN YOUR atereo Into "Surround 
Sound"— Sentul 4-chennel adepter wllh four 
VU-melere, frontlteer controls, walnut 
cabinet. 675; two mat speakers, $22; TEAC 
Dolby noise reducer. 640— si I from Korean PX. 
bras* fireplace screen, tools, andirons, 625; 
draftsman/commercial snlsl llghltabla. 622; 
call Tim BOO am -5-OOp.m 5324415 (149- 
1501 

SAILBOAT — 1972 HobH Cat. 14'. In excellent 
condition Trailer and all equipment Included 
For more Information call: Dave 539-7654. 
(149193) 

PRICE REDUCED 6790-now only 62.750 1964 
10x93 mobile home wllh extension on living 
room. 9394921 9-9; 937 1764 alter 5 (140-151) 

1972 12x60 3 bedroom mobile home New car 
petlng. 5394621 95.(149-152) 



SMALL SANYO Refrigerator with wooden 
cabinet. 6100 or beet offer. Phone: 5324414. 
(149-151) 

1974 12x80 2 bedroom mobile home. A nice 
home. 5394621 9-5. (1 49- 1 52) 

1977 KAWASAKI KZ400 5,300 ml let. LaManta 
taring, cuatorn aaat. backrest and luggage 
rack. Great hi way 1 raveling. 11,400. Call 537 
7710.(149-153) 

12x69, TWO bedroom mobile home, IV) bellts. 
air, appliances, Inexpensive lot rani. 63690. 
Call 7764062 alter 800 p.m. (1 49-150) 

STOP DRAFTS— save energy. For tale 
aluminum tracks tor remounting double-hung 
windows. Several alzea available 64—66 per 
eet. 539-1546. (149-152) 

12x55, 1967 Great Lake* mobile home. Two 
bedroom* , appliance)*, air, anchored, tklrted. 
Rocky Ford Trailer Park Call 7764052 after 

6:00 p.m. (149-190) 

8x43 MOBILE home, tklrted. waaher, (had on 
lot, good condition, call between 4:30—600 

pjn. 7764476. (149-153) 



971 BUDDY, 12X66 mobile 

bedroom*, Includes epp Hence*, washer, dryer 
and ahag carpet. 65200. Call 7764655. (149- 
193) 



FREE 

BASY Of miLS, cell 776-4260 attar 9O0 p.m. 
(14*190) 



WELCOME 



ON THURSDAY afternoons, • one-helt hour 
celebration of Holy Communion al 4:30 p.m. In 
Den forth Chapel. Open to all, sponsored by 
the Flrat PreebyterUn Church (149) 



LOST 



AT WEST Stadium-Key* and key ring. Call 534 

5413.(147-149) 

I HAVE purchased I he Bullard Lathe* located on 
the west side of Seaton Court* To the person 
who can produce the hydraulic motor which 
was taken tram one ol theee tat he* during the 
weed Ol April 16, 1 would gladly buy you one 
that you can use In exchange lor I hit special 
motor or will offer * reward for II* return. Con- 
tact Key Machine Tool, P.O. Box 2S4, 
Wamepo, KS 66547. (14S1 90) 

GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY book. Understanding: 
Behavior, In Elsenhower on Thursday. 532- 
5201.(144149) 

SMOKE COLORED eyegleaae* In black caaa: 
vicinity ol Fen-ell Library Reward. Call Scott 
537 7127 or 5394701. (144-152) 



PERSONAL 



TO THE Masked Marauders, Breakfast with you 
we srway* wished could be: but we never 
dreamt that It would be doughnut* at three I 
The Men of PI Kappa Alpha. (149) 

k.e.a. 100 days from today we begin our lite 
together forever I With mom then love, N.ES. 
(149) 

TO WHOM It May Concern: Thenx tor the 
beautiful May baskets. Wa loved them. Judy, 
Chris, and Terri. (149) 

OU'S— WE'RE your best supporter* I See you et 
Mel'*. We love you I She-OU'e. (149) 

HERE'S TO Deb, she's a reel tine gal . Anyone 
f or " J I If In " at M el '*? H ow abou I din ner et Oer 
by? Boozer *907. (149) 

MANY THANKS to all the people who helped 
make my 21et so special. Love. Betty B. (149) 



WANTE0 



TO BUY: Pleyboys, Pleyglrls, Penthouse, Oul, 
Gallery and other*. Comic *, paperbacks, 
coins, stamps, mlHIaria, antiques. Treasure 
Chest. Aggleville— DM Town Mall (129-159) 

TYPING WANTED. Highest quality work; editing 
optional; extra-large type available It wanted 
for speeches, visually Impaired. 930-4876, 
5:00400 p.m (142-149) 

MOVING TO California, need someone to drive 
U-Heul truck. Call 9374489 after 7:00 p.m. 
(149-149) 

RIDE NEEDED to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Will 
share driving end gas; leaving final week. Call 
John. 5394623. (1 44150) 

TO BUY: old. cheep, photo enlarger. Call 774 
1221.(147-151) 

GOING TO San Francisco sreal Would like lo 
send Iwo tables, two feel square Will share 
gas. Local resident. 5379471.(144152) 

TOBUY— New or used violin In good condition. 
Call or see Dave. Room 221, Good now 532 
5223.(149-151) 

A RESPONSIBLE person lo live In our house 
July 8 August 1 In exchange for tending cats 
and house. References required 5341548 
(144152) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

SUMMER/FALL, lamele* to shsie large fur 
nlehed house, privets bedrooms, more 680 
end up Most bill* paid. 1005 Vsltler end 1122 
Vstttsr 5394401.(121-150) 

FEMALE TO share comlortsbia furnished span 
menl. One gal lo (oin two others Private 
room, air conditioning. 690. ul l lilies peld. Call 
539-2883 or 7740710. (140- 1 49) 

ONE FEMALE lo loin three other* In tpeclout 
apart men t, meln floor of large home, tor sum- 
met Close to campus 675, utilities paid. Call 
539-2883 or 5398329 (144 149) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE 10 shere Wildcat Inn spar 
tment for summer. Call Pern, 7784400 (144 
150) 

FALL: TWO female* needed to share two 
bed room , two bath , tu rnlshed duplexwllhtwo 
othert 680/monih includes utilities. Close to 
campus Call 7747339 (145-149) 

LIBERAL ROOMMATE wanted. Close to cam- 
pus, Aggleville, and perk Utilities 
peM-6f OXVmonth. 7747191 (145146) 

LOOKING FOR one or two roommates for sum 
mer. Private bedroom, use of swimming poet. 
Call 5374093 (145-149) 

PERSON WANTED to Share two-bedroom 

mobile home, private bedroom, washer and 
dryer Fell and spring. Rent 6100 and half 
utilities Marvin 537-7941, (147151) 

MALE ROOMMATE needed tor this summer to 
there luxury apartment. Approximately 8100 
with utilities 5374129. (147-190) 



FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to ahara luxury 
two bedroom apartment for tummer For In- 
formation call 7747181 after 9:00 p.m (147 
191) 

MALE/FEMALE vegetarians preferred, but eon 
•kJer all mallow and liberal person*. Cto*» to 
campu*. park. Summer/fall after 4 :00 p.m. Tad, 

537-2395. (147-151) 

MALE ROOMMATE to shan nice, fully fur 

: for i 



Carpeted, central air, dishwasher. Call 937- 
8229.(144190) 

LIBERAL FEMALE roommate wanted im- 
mediately to there mobile home. Private 
bedroom Washer /dryer 686 monthly plus 
electricity 9374296 after 5:30. (144153) 

ONE OR two roommate* to share apartment lor 
tall and spring. Located sway from campu*. 

Fordetellt cell 7740493 (149-155) 

FOR SUMMER. 670 a month and hall electricity. 
Good location, 930 N, 14th, between 
Aggleville, perk, and campu*. Call Chris 
Blgga. 9374305. 5394S27 after 5:30. (144153) 



FOUND 

IN WEBER Halt: black lotd-up umbrella Claim In 
Weber 117 (144150) 

SET OF keya from UPC sprlngoreek trip. Call 
6324870.1144191) 



SUBLEASE 



SPACIOUS TWO bedroom apartment for tum- 
mer— turn Itrted, air, balcony, off street 
parking, on* block from Aheam, rant 
negotiable. Call 532-3831. (144149) 

FOR SUMMER: Two bedroom fumlaned luxury 
apart men t, close lo campus, central ak, dlstv 
wssher. laundry facilities No pets. Call 537- 
1218 (140-149) 

FOR JUNE and July, on* bedroom good for two, 
6100. Two bedroom good lor three. 9150. Four 
bedroom, 6100. Near campus. Call 5374426. 
(142-151) 

WILDCAT VI— early and lata occupancy, acroaa 
from t letdhouae, one bedroom apartment, fur- 
nished, central air, laundry, 8130. 5372342. 
(144149) 

TWO BEDROOM apartment, fumlaned, air con- 
ditioned, ell electric, dlehwesher, halt block 
from campu* on Clallln, two- three person*, 
* 120 monthly. Call 778-4 147, (145 149) 

SUMMER LUXURY two bedroom apartment 
with dlehweaher. central elr, carpeting, and 
balcony. Across from Goodnow Hall. 
8150/monlh. Call 9374722. (144149) 

COOL TWO bedroom furnished basement apart, 
man! for thoae hoi months. Lundln Apart 
merit*, on* block west ol campus. Pries 
negotiable, 7744394 (1441 49) 

MUST SUBLEASE-June and July -furnished 
Mont Blue apartment. Ak conditioning, car- 
pet, cloaa lo campus. Price negotiable. 937- 
2878 or 7749621 (144149) 

LARGE THREE bedroom apartment « 

62257month or O 675/month per room. All 
utilities paid, furnished-two waterbed*, 
screen porch. 7743349. (144150) 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom, carpeted apartment 
Central ak. dlthwaaher. Cloee to campu*, 
cable TV Included, negotiable, available Mey 
22,5374744.(144150) 

LARGE ONE bedroom apartment, air con- 
ditioned, fumlaned wllh dishwasher. Two to 
three people. 1010 Manhattan Ave. Rent 6150. 
call 532-3297. (144190) 

ONE BEDROOM furnished, one block from cam 
pus 8100 monthly June and July. All utilities 
paid. 7744010or 7747570. (147-149) 



SUMMER: SPACIOUS one bedroom apartment 
tnOrmonlh, available June 1 Cell 7741 752 al 
tar 600 p.m. (144159) 

ONE BEDROOM, brick apartment. Ak con 
dllloned with carport, two blocks trom cam- 
pu*. Call 5394772 or 7741525. (144191) 

PERFECT SUMMER apertmenl, two bedroom, 
furnished, modernized. Swimming, tennis halt 
block away. Campus only three blocks 1417 
Leavenworth, Gold Key apartment. Excellent 
price Rick. 5374038. (1 44152) 

WANT AN inexpensive apartment tor summer? 
8125 will get you furnished apertment, close 
to campus, air conditioned, parking, balcony. 
Call 5394963. (144150) 

JUNE-JULY, IV) bedroom, ak conditioned, fully 
turn is had, three blocks from campus, very 
reasonable 532-3679 (144152) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT apartment across from 
Aheem. Nice, one bedroom, furnished, central 
air, two balconies. Up to three people. Early 
occupancy available. 6130fmonth 537-9631. 
(144150) 

RENT NEGOTIABLE lor furnished two-bedroom 
duplex. Iwo bath a. dishwasher, elr con- 
ditioned, yard, parking. Close to campus. Call 
5346983 Or 5394447 (1 44 ISO) 

JUNE -JULY: Mont Blue duplex. Carpeted, cen- 
tral ak, all conveniences. Greatly reduced 
rete* lor summer, reasonable 532-3844 (144 

150) 

FOR SUMMER: one bedroom apartment Air 
conditioned, close lo campus. Good for Iwo, 
8190 par month. Call Dave 5374479 (144190) 

SUMMER— SUBLET: luxury Iwo bedroom apart - 
menl, fumlthed/unfumlshed. air conditioned, 
dishwasher, belcony. laundry facilities, reser- 
ved parking, rent negotiable 5371556 
evenings. (1441 52) 

LUXURY APARTMENT, sacrificed price, fur- 
nished, two bedroom duplex, washer and 
dryer In apartment, private parking for lour, 
two blocks from campus. 6220 monthly, Mont 
Blue apertmenl. Phone 7747338. Mey paid 
(144152) 

LUXURY FURNISHED two bedroom, for three 
Mutt eacrlflc* by renting ridiculously low. 
Lttt twelve day* of May tree 5347654 (144 
190) 

FOR SUMMER: Iwo bedroom Mont Blue apart- 
ment, furnished, air conditioning, laundry, 
tree cable, pay electricity only. Rent 
negotiable 5374794(144152) 

MAY 22 August 20 Nice, roomy, furnished one 
bedroom a part men t Air conditioned, lots ol 
window*, close lo campus. 8100 monthly and 
electricity Deaperale. Becky. 5392019 (144 
153) 

SPACIOUS: FOUR bedroom house, two bath*, 
two car garage, big yard, nice are*. 2301 An- 
darton Must sublease Call 7784478 1144 
192) 

(Continued on pao» 15) 



< 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Triun, May 4, 1tN 



18 



(Contkiuad from pag* 14) 

FOR SUMMER. three bedroom house, cheep 
enough for two people, large kitchen, good 
location next lo cr*«n Call PrMI, 537 9317 
047-149) 

JUNE-JULY, two bedroom four-person apart - 
mart ISO aach par month Utilities paid, air 
conditioned, screened porch, close lo cem- 
pua. Call Mrs Lengham, 539-3934 (147-150) 

ONE BEDROOM- Laawood Apartmanta. 1837 

Colisge Heights, lumlthad. air condition*!, 
halt block Trom campus, Juna 1-July 31, 
coup la or two alnglaa. 1125/monlh plus elec 
trtclly Call David, 776-1364 or Debbie. 776- 
1590.(147-151) 

SUMMER-SUBLEASE luxury two bedroom 
apartment For Information call 778-7181 (147- 
150) 

CALL 775-5353. apartmant for one or two, air 
conditioned, good location, rant negotiable, 
check this one outl (147-1 49) 

WE'RE DESPERATE: price negotiable (or two- 
bedroom apartment. Air conditioned, dish- 
washer Great location WIN listen lo any otter 
537-0555. (147-149) 

JUNE-JULV: 1 Vi bedroom, lumlahad apartment. 
air conditioned, disposal, snag carpal, three 
brocks from campus Vary reasonable Call 
537-0505 (145-149) 

SUMMER-LARGE one bedroom apartment, 
(urn It had. shag, air conditioned, very nice and 
spacious, close lo campus — Agg lav Ilia, must 
aublsssa. see and make otter. 778-1551. (148- 
151) 

SUMMER. THREE badroom, 1 v* bath, furnished, 
1978 mobile home Cable, pool, tennis courts. 
May 20 through mid-August Good price. 537 
8388.(148-152) 



For June & July 

subleasing 2 bedroom 

apartment. Mont 

Blue Complex 

Laundry facilities, 

balcony, air conditioning 

close to campus. 

Cut Rate $150 per mo. 

Call 532-3147 or 532-3148 



FURNISHED MONT Blue Duplex, two large 
bedrooms, two baths, washer and dryer, cen- 
tral air, carpel I ng. plenty of room lor four. 
Close to campus. Available May 22-Aug. 1 
Call us first at 537-4089. (149-153) 

SUMMER: TWO badroom, OMnwood Apartmant. 
furnished with sir conditioning and dish- 
washer. Acroaa from Ahearn Call 537-0489. 
(149-152) 

RENT NEGOTIABLE; speclou s two bedroom fur- 
nished apartment, air conditioning, carpet 
and cable TV. One block wast of Ahaem. Call 
770-3478. (149-153) 

SUMMER: FURNISHED, luxurious, large 
badroom com lortabte lor three, 1 12 block from 
campus, negotiable price. Coach lamp, 1225 
Clallln Patty 53*4811 '341 (149-153) 

HOUSE— FOUR badroom furnished, two baths, 
air conditioning, laundry facilities Easy ac- 
ceas lo campus, enclosed backyard. Cheap I 
Call Jay or Jeff 539-8423, Tom (103) or Chuck 
(101)5394211. (149-153) 

SUMMER— VERY nice two bedroom house Two 
blocks east of campus IVi baths, air con- 
ditioning, carpet, full basement, garage, will 
accommodate tour Call 5394057 (149-150) 

CUTE: TWO bedroom, fully furnished apart, 
men I Central air, shag carpeting, dishwasher. 
Cloaa to campus and Aggleville Good lor 
three Rant negotiable 778-3049 (149-153) 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom furnished house with 
air and parking. Gas. water, trash, cable paid. 
920 Bart rand. 770-3182 after 5:00 p.m. {149- 
150) 

MUST RENT this spacious oneVtwo badroom 
apartmant Carpeting and furniture. Con 
vanient location Rent negotiable trom 9125. 
Call 776-3*88 (149-153) 

SUMMER-LUXURIOUS two badroom apart- 
ment with central air, carpeting, dishwasher, 
and laundry (acuities One block from 
Aggleville. 770-4945, (149-153) 



MAY 20, across from Aheem. air conditioned, 
laundry, two balconies, one badroom, 1-3 
people Wildcat Ji , 1130 5374)828. (148-152) 

MUST SUBLEASE: beautiful, secluded two 
badroom apartment, large wooden doors open 
onto veranda, 8125. Can Ten 7784291. (148- 
150) 

LUNOIN APARTMENT, furnished, two badroom, 
one block from campus. June-July, 7784775. 
(148-152) 

EXTRA NICE I Two bedroom apartment off Kim- 
ball aaal of CtCO park Available now Call 
537-0820 Rant negotiable. (149-153) 



Low as $120 a Month 

Wildcat Inn Apts. 

For 

June and July 

Summer School 

Furnished- 
Air Conditioning 

WE HAVE 
LIMITED AVAILABILITY 

For More Information 
CaU 



CELESTE 
539-5001 



TWO BEDROOM apartment. Furnished, air Gon- 
dii toned, carpet, dishwasher, appliances. One 
block from Aggleville, five from campus. 
Largs rooms, loads of closet space Rani 
negotiable. 7780535. (149-150) 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom, furnished, nice 
basement apartment. Close to campus 
(lOQVmonth plus electricity. Call 778-4390 af- 

ter 5:00pm .(149-151) 

SUMMER— ONE bedroom apartment across 
from csmpus— two or three people. Air con- 
ditioning, dishwasher, balcony. Call 778-4329 
afterSflOp.m. (149-153) 



SERVICES 

RESUMES TYPESET, designed and printed by 
professionals gat results. 100 Impressions- 
SI 7 The Offset Press prints anything. 778- 
1.317 Houston. (23tf) 



RESUMES WRITTEN from scratch by 
professional writers. Your resume la written, 
designed, (ypeaet, printed. 100 coplee/t25 
537-7688 (138-155) 



SOUPENE'S 
COMPUTER 
ALIGNMENT 

114 South 5th 



776-8054 



HART TRANSFER and Storage loves your 
moves, And, we love your storage too, for thai 
matter. If wa can be of service to you, please 
call— we have some of the lowest raise 
aval labia for overseas shipping, domestic 
moving, and for warehouse storage. Our 
trained stsf t of professional movers can make 
all arrangements for your move, saving you 
time, money, and worry. Call Diane for rates at 
776-8633 Prom Hart ol America 10 Anywhere 
In the Work). (149) 



NOTICES 



MANHATTAN PAWN Shop. 317 S. 41h Street, 
778-8112 — Slereos, 8 tracks. TV'S, 
typewriters, guitars, cameras Suy-sell-trade. 

ALVAREZ GUITARS oilers you a saving Of 
188.68 on accessories and services when you 
purchase one of their fine acoustics Your 
local dealer Is Strings 'n Things, 814 N 12lh, 
Aggleville. 539-2009 (1 44-1 50) 

FROZEN YOGURT on lap at Deity's Daughter, a 
natural foods restaurant. Made only with pure 
wholesome Ingredlenls. 300 N. 3rd. Open 
Mon -Sat 11:00-9:00 7764207 1145-149) 



CUSTOM MADE 14 kl gold wedding bands Win. 
dike Jewelry. 230 N 3rd, Manhattan. (1 1WI 

STEREO REPAIR— faal, reasonable competent 
repair of most brands. Over 300 replacement 
needles In stock. The Circuit Shop, through 
the Record Store 776-1221 (12 111) 



EUROPE 

Less than '£ Economy Fare 
Guaranteed Reservations Call toll 
free 800-325-4867 or see your travel 
agent UniTravel Charters 

BOB SEOER, Foreigner, Head East. Uriah Heap, 
Bob Welch, Arrowhead Concert tickets on 
sale now ai the Record Store In Aggleville 
937-7555 (149-153) 

RONNIE MILSAP Concert tickets al the Record 
Store in Aggleville 537-7555. (149-153) 

ATTENTION 

HATER'S DRIVING School taking applications 
now. For Information call Key Inc. , Manhattan, 
KS, 537-8330. (109-155) 

PIANO INSTRUCTION 

Now is the time to schedule piano 
lessons with Kurt Werner, Mr. 
Werner is a graduate of KSU and 
the Manhattan School of Music 
NYC. He has studied with 
Margaret Walker, Charles Strat- 
ton, Robert Goldsand and Jeanne 
Dowis. Phone 5374924 

BLOCK AND Bridle Members: Banquet tickets 
on sale Wsdneaday, May 3— Friday, May S. In 
front of Weber 107. Deadline — May 5, 4:30 
p.m, (149) 



HELP WANTED 

WAITRESSES OR waiters and bartenders. Call 
539-9753 attar 12:00 noon. (143-1 50) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: require hard working 
students. Involves bookkeeping, marketing, 
and Inventory. No experience necessary, 
willing lo relocate. 537-9014, after 5:00 p.m 
(144-153) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT-end May through 
September— truck/combine drivers needed 
for custom harvesting Contact Slave 
Schneider, 913-438-7225, Lincoln, KS 67455. 
(145-156) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT— Swimming and 

springboard diving instructors are needed for 
the KSU Community Physical Activities 
Program. All applicants must have a current 
WSI certificate and be enrolled lull -time itila 
spring or summer. Call 532-6242 afternoons 
(147-151) 

SAMBO'S NEEDS graveyard waitresses- 10:00 
p.m. lo 6:00 a.m. Call Jaff Lips at 5394479 
(148-149) 

PART-TIME summer work with children and 
youth for a church In Manhattan. Write Box 
338, Manhattan, KS 68502. (149-153) 



LPN'S-RN'S 

3:00 pm. 11:00pm 

11:00-7:00 a.m. 

shifts 

Full and Part-time 

Positions Available 

Generous Salaries 

Apply in person 

College Hill Skilled 
Nursing Center 

2423 Kimball 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

VISTA DRIVE In haa openings for help In foun- 
tain or grill. Start part-time now and work full 
or part-time this summer. Apply In person 
(148-152) 

TWO HOURS par day to assist with housework, 
Kva daya par week. 1130 monthly. Muat have 
own transports! ion Females preferred. 539- 
2747.(148-155) 



TAKING NEXT year off? Earn f 125rweek as Live 
In Mother's Helper lor a bright 9 year old girt 
Start September 1. 1978. Write. H. Brody, 79 
Clinton Ave., West port. Conn 08880 (148-149) 



COMPANY HAS a tarn positions for K-State 
students Last year the average K -Slate 
■ludenl earned 13.900. For interview call 776 
3842(149-153) 

HOUSEBOYS. FALL 1978, lor Interview call 539- 
3424.4149-1511 

SUMMER JOBS: A lot haa bean said about 
working tor Vanity hare at K -State Them's a 
couple of tacts you may not be aware of: (1) 
Our average student last summer made over 
83,000. m Wa have never had a graduata ol 
our program not b* accepted to graduata, law, 
denial, vat, and, yes, even medical school. It 
you think it's lima you learned how to express 
your sell batter and you don't mind hard work, 
than this is your invitation to an Interview 
today at 3:00 or 7 00 p.m In Union 207. Good 
luck, you'll need It. (149) 

NEED undergraduate students for an ex- 
periment on learning Participants will be paid 
13 00 for IVt houra. Pre test will be given at 
Denis on HeH 21 8, May 4th and 5th from 
8:30-9:30 p.m. (149-150) 



FOR RENT 

TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electrics and 
manuals: day, weak or month. Buuella, 511 
Leavenworth, across from poet office. Call 

776-9469 (111) 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS: excellent selection 
Hull Business Machines, 1212 Mora, 539-7931. 
Service most makes ot typewriters. Also Vic- 
tor and Olivetti adders (til) 

ONE, TWO, three bedroom furnished, un- 
furnished apartments tor summerrfall. 10 or 12 
month contracts No pets. 537-8389 (1 19tt) 

LARGE, NICE, turn (shed apartment Three 
males Private. Parking Reasonable. Knotty 
plna walls. Large bedroom, single beds. For 
fall 7784897. (140-149) 

NOW LEASING kixury studio apartments. One 
block east ol campus. Available June i and 
August 1. Mont Blue Apartments. 539-4447. 
(144-149) 

FOUR BEDROOM house, two slory, one block 
from campus. For six persons, $75 per person. 
Available Juna 1st 537-4848.(144-149) 

TWO BEDROOM, partially furnished apartment, 
two blocks from camp us. 1225 monthly Lease 
and deposit. 5394872. (145-149) 

SUMMER— TWO badroom, furnished, newly 
remodeled baseman I apartment wllh private 
entrance. Nice quiet street, close lo campus, 
park and Aggleville. II 70 plus electricity, 776- 
4180.(146-149) 

LARGE APARTMENT available May 22, 8143. 
Two bedrooms, full basement, central air, 
refrigerator, stove, carpeting. Prairie Glen 
Cooperative Townhousea. 7769875. (148-150) 

FOR JUNE and July, new campus, furnished, air 
conditioned, two badroom, StSOfmonth, piui 
part utilities. Furnished, large, three badroom, 
8200, bills paid. Furnished, target four 
bedroom, 1240, bills paid. 5394904. (147 156) 

Furnished/ Unfurnished 
Apartments 

•At KSU 

• One to four bedrooms 

• Most bills paid 

Phone 539-8401 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1, luxury two badroom fur- 
nished apartment. All appliances, fireplace. 
carpal, air, near campus, ample parking. Call 
7704487. 537-4587. (148-152) 

THREE BEDROOM house, furnished, with 
washer/dryer Close to campus, one year 
lease, available Juna let. 7784870. (148-152) 

UNFURNISHED APARTMENT at 814 Wildcat 
Ridge: living room, dining room, bedroom, kit- 
Chan, bath. Pay electricity only. 1190 per mon- 
th. Available Juna 1. Call 776-7877 (home) 532- 
8718 (aak for Proteeeor Malheme). (148-1 50) 

MAIN FLOOR apartmant at 627 Pierre Street: 
living room, bedroom, kllchen, bath, Iron I and 
back porches. Pay electricity only. 8180 per 
month. Available Juna 1 . Call 778-7877 (home) 
5324)718 (ask for Professor Malheme). (148- 
150) 

THREE BEDROOM house, half acre fenced. 
wast Manhattan. Available first ol June. Prefer 
families. After 6:00 p.m 2934313. (148-1 55) 



PEANUTS 



by Charles Shu Itz 



I GOT AN "A" ON 
,/VW REPORT SNOOWfj 





BECAUSE VOL/ WERE 5UCH 
A 816 HELP I'M GOING 
TO TREAT HOV TO AN 
ICE-CREAM CONE 




FLAVORS 




) 



I 



a— S-M 




DOWNSTOWN 



by Tim Downs 



(iosH,HOuconnE\ 

TOUDrTTE? J 




UNFURNISHED NEWLY 
pel so. twc-bedroom. tilurfisnt apartment 
Weak to school Range and refrigerator fur. 
nlahed. Heat, water and traafi pass. Room for 
two. No pais 1210 monthly. 5394133 or 539- 
3085. evenings (147150) 

UNFURNISHED, TWMEDAOOM duplex with 
basement Walking distance to campus. 
Rang* and retrlgerslor furnished Heat, water, 
and trash paid. Room lor three Nopals. 8270 
5394133 or 5394088, evenings. (1 47-160) 

PARKVIEW 

Student Housing 

Osage and nth St. 

Near Campus 

NearAggieville 

• furnished 

• free parking 

• equipped kitchen 

• laundromat 

• $55 and up 

Reserve now for 
summer and fall 

Phone 537-4233 



FOR SUMMER-fall. furnished, air conditioned. 
paneled, one and two badroom apartments 
Reasonable terms. 5394904. (147-155) 

SUMMER: ROOMY one badroom apartment 850 
a month plus electricity. Call Alan 6394211, 

Room 617. leave message. (148-150) 



GOLD KEY 
APARTMENTS 



New deluxe 2 Bedroom— Modern 
Furniture— Garbage Disposal— 
Dishwasher— Shag Carpeted with 
Drapes. Close to City Park, Tennis 
Courts, Campus and AggievUle (3 
blocks). 

$245— $275— $300 
for students 

1417—1419 Leavenworth 

Leasing for Fall and one im- 
mediately. 



ONE BEDROOM tumiahad apartment with 
oarage. Available August 15th. 1165 monthly, 
plus utilities 410 S. 16th. 340 10 8.-00 p.m. 
(148-150) 

AUGUST 1ST, three story unfurnished house. 
Three bathe, 13 rooms. Next to campus. 8400 
plus ul I lit km Contract and deposit. 5374389. 
(148-155) 



SUMMER RENTALS 

ROYAL TOWERS 
APTS. 

Two Bedrooms 
$135.00 a month 

Air Conditioning 

All Utilities Paid 

including Cable TV 

Contract June 1 —July 31 

$150.00 Deposit 

CaU 539-8851 or 539-9610 

5:00 p.m.— 7:00 p.m. 



LUXURY DUPLEX, furnished, one year old, three 
large bedrooms, fully carpeted, walk to cam- 
pus, modem kitchen, 832S. 537-1 724. (146-150) 

HOUSE-EXCELLENT decor, air conditioned, 
carpal and drapes, part furnished Two 
badroom furnished apartment, bom two 
blocks from KSU. Non-smokers. 537-1907 
(1*9) 



NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

aAPARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 
from $165 

* FREE shuttle service 

to KSU 

• portion of utilities paid 

* adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

Phone 

539-2951 

or see at 

1413 Cambridge Place 



JUNE-JULY: IVt bedroom, furnished, balcony. 
air conditioned, disposal, water paid, three 
blocks to Aggleville and campus Reasonable. 
It 75 plus electricity 778-1693.(149-151) 

LOWER LEVEL ol e bi level on Tuttle. Bedroom, 
bathroom, den/study, kitchen. Paneled and 
carpeted. NO pets 5394483. (1 49) 



KAWSA1 1TATE COLLEQIAW, Thwi., M«y «, tin 



"LITE TASTES GREAT AND 
IT'S LESS FILLING. I ALSO LIKE 



THE EASY-OPENING CAN'.' 



Bubbn Smith 
Former All-Pro Lineman 




OW7I Millar Browing Co , Milwaukee. Wis 



KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOC 
TQPEKA, K3 66612 * 



Name of the game: 
Stretch the sports dollar 

by CHRIS WILLIAMS 
Editor 

John Graham, chairman of the Intercollegiate Athletic Council 
(IAC), said Wednesday the 1978-79 K-State athletic budget was 
based on "competitive needs, the equitability in the budget and a 
limited pie." 

"The budget constructed was an austere budget," Graham said 
"It's a fact of life mat the money coming in is far below others 
(schools)." 

Graham said the IAC took a "business-like approach" to the 
budget and said it would be used as a "tool lor management plan- 
ning and control" and to help the IAC aid coaches in establishing 
priorities in the spending of the money. 

Graham said that of the $2,435 million budgeted, $2,361 million is 
derived from four sources: football, men's basketball, state money 
and contributions. 

HE ALSO said K-State's budget was as much as $500,000 less than 
every other school in the Big Eight and almost $3 million less than 
schools such as Oklahoma and Nebraska. 

"We get a heckuva lot out of the little money we've got," Graham 
said. "The problem is that how do we spend the poverty?" 

Graham said the IAC gave the coaches the ability to set their own 
priorities by increasing the salaries and travel expenses, especially 
in the non-revenue sports. 

"Now a coach can ask himeslf 'Do I sign the athlete or do I take 
the team to New York's Madison Square Garden,'" Graham said. 
"Now the coach has to set his priorities. 

"It was evident none of the coaches were going to get anywhere 
near what they wanted. 

"This is no way meant to be derogatory toward the coaches. It's 
human nature. You're going to want to get as much as you can get." 



Don Harmon earns approval to 
take over city manager's post 



By DAVE HUGHES 
City Editor 

In a special Manhattan City Commission meeting 
Thursday, Don Harmon was unanimously approved 
as city manager. 

Harmon, a 53-year-old native of Coldwater, will 
begin his duties May 30. 

His selection capped a four-month search which 
involved the screening of 72 applicants from 
throughout the country. 

As city manager of Joplin, Mo., and Council Bluffs, 
Iowa, Harmon participated in the redevelopment of 
those cities' downtowns. 

IN COUNCIL Bluffs, where he served from 1968 
until coming to Manhattan, "Harmon was a key 
figure in the inception and completion of an eight- 
acre downtown renewal project in the central 
business district which included a new all-weather 
retail shopping mall," Mayor Robert binder said. He 
was also involved In similar activities in Joplin as 
city manager from 1959 to 1968. 



Under said Harmon's experience in downtown 
development was a major factor in his selection. 

In past positions, Harmon was also involved in the 
industrial development of Boulder, Colo., Joplin and 
Council Bluffs. 

Harmon said he came to Manhattan because it is a 
college town and has a good reputation it has around 
the state. 

"I started out in a college town," (Boulder, site of 
the University of Colorado) he said. "It's kind of like 
coming back home." 

THE NEW city manager will take over from Les 
Rieger, who resigned the post in January because of 
"physical and mental pressures... that were 
detrimental to my well-being." Rieger will stay on 
with the city as Manhattan's financial director. 

Harmon received his undergraduate in political 
science and economics at Drury College in 
Springfield, Mo., and completed his graduate work 
in Public Administration at the University of Den- 
ver. 



Collegian 



Friday 



May 5, 1978 

Kansas State University, 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 84 No. 150 



Senate turns 
thumbs down 
on IAC crew 

By DOUGLASS DANIEL 
SGA Editor 

Student Senate rejected a 
resolution approving the student 
members of the Intercollegiate 
Athletic Council (IAC) during the 
last scheduled senate meeting of 
the year last night. 

The resolution was defeated, 27- 
12, after controversy arose during 
the meeting when some senators 
and representatives of women's 
athletics at K State said the 
recommended IAC student 
members didn't represent the 
views of women in the athletic 
department. 

Some senators and students said 
the lack of a voting female student 
member of the council was not 
representative of the student body 
or of University athletics. 

"We, as women athletes, feel 
that we aren't being well 
represented at all," said Tami 
Johnson, a member of women's 
basketball team. 

Johnson said the student 
members showed they were not 
supportive of women's athletics by 
not giving them a larger budget for 
their program. 

"The point is we don't get enough 
money for the things we deserve as 
student athletes," said Jan 
Laughin, junior in civil 
engineering. 

"I just feel like there should have 
been a women appointed to this 
board," said Candi Caplinger, 
home economics senator. 

Recommended as voting student 
members of IAC were Bill Oswald, 
Craig McVey and Ted Knopp, all of 
whom had served previously on the 
council. Roger Page and Gwen- 
<See SENATE, p.3) 



Inside 



HOWDY I More October 
temperatures are slated for 
today. Details, page 3... 

RESTAURANT ROMP 

uncovers a genuine threat to 
Mom's old-fashioned cooking, 
page 5... 




Photo by Bo Rader 



Tackle Trap 

Far from the madding crowd of coaches, trainers, sophomore tackle on the football team, works to keep 
players, cross-blocks and traps, Walt Wywadis, a In time during a ballet routine in class Thursday. 

$75,000 extra 

Surplus angers residents of Jardine 



By DIANE JOHNSON 
Collegian Reporter 

The combination of a $75,000 
operating surplus this year and a 
$3 to $5 per month rent increase 
next year has sparked sharp 
criticism from many Jardine 
Terrace residents. 

The residents reacted to the 
disclosure earlier this week that 
the complex operated at a surplus 
last year while the three small 
residence halls operated at a 
$127,000 deficit. 

Thomas Frith, director of 
housing, denied that the rent, now 
at $91 for a one-bedroom un- 
furnished and $105 for a two- 
bedroom unfurnished apartment, 



would be increased saying "no 
changes are plannned for this 
July." 

In a telephone call to the housing 
office Thursday, however, rent 
prices for the fall semester were 
quoted as $94 for a one-bedroom 
and $110 for a two-bedroom un- 
furnished apartment. 

Judy Edwards, junior in arts and 
sciences and a member of Jar- 
dine's mayors council, said the 
small residence hails should be 
paying for themselves. 

"It's not supposed to be a profit 
making situation— all the halls 
should be breaking even," 
Edwards said. "If a unit isn't 
paying for themselves, they should 



come up with alternative ways to 
operate the unit. If they (the small 
halls) don't break even, I don't feel 
like I should pay for them." 

EDWARDS SAID she doesn't 
think it is fair that the residents of 
Jardine will be charged extra rent 
next fiscal year if they wish to have 
showers installed. 

"I would like to have a shower, 
but I don't want to pay extra rent 
for it when we are paying for that 
(small hall) food service," 
Edwards said. 

"The distribution of funds is 
uneven, something needs to be 
done about it If it (the income 
from Jardine) was a meager 



amount it wouldn't be as bad— but I 
don't call $75,000 meager," she 
said. 

"I feel I'm lucky to feed my own 
kids— there have got to be some 
alternative systems to be used in 
the small hall," she said, "I don't 
want a dependent over in Boyd to 
buy food for." 

Frederick Catrell, fiscal officer 
for housing, said the money all of 
the halls (including Jardine) bring 
in goes into a total operation fund 
for the use of all the halls. 

"A lot of years we can't spend all 
of the money because we don't 
have the materials or the people to 
do the work," Catrell said. 

(See IMPROVEMENTS, p.2) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frl., May M»78 



Sororities to start annexes 
to house additional women 



By PEGGY PATCHEN 

Collegian Reporter 

K -State sororities will allow members to live out of 
house next semester for the first time since the 1990s, 
in order to accommodate the increasing number of 
women going through rush. 

Early in March, the Panhellenic Board approved 
sorority annexation, which allows sororities to 
pledge more women and enables members to live 
outside of the house. 

However, only two of the 10 K-State sororities have 
chosen to do so. Alpha Delta Pi sorority plans to 
annex next semester and the Kappa Alpha Theta 
sorority will install a new live-in, live-out policy. 

Kappa Alpha Theta sorority, one of the smaller 
houses on campus with an in-house membership of 
54, is working to increase membership, according to 
Carol Hahn, Kappa Alpha Theta president and 
sophomore in fashion marketing. 

Next semester, the sorority will follow a live-in, 
live-out policy which will give senior members the 
first option to live outside of the house and choose 
their own housing. After 40 percent of the seniors 
have moved out, juniors will then have the option, 
said Evan Thiessen, junior in milling science and 
one of the six girls who will live outside of the 
sorority. 

"I decided to let someone else move in because 
I've lived in the house for two years. Before we were 
not allowed to live out without resigning from the 
house or being a townee," Thiessen said. 

KAPPA ALPHA Theta does not plan to annex 
because it can't afford the extra housing expense. 
Each member moving out is to pay the extra ex- 
penses of living in an apartment. Thiessen expects to 
pay approximately $20 more per month to live in the 
apartment than in the house which will include 
apartment expenses, food and bouse dues. 

"These girls will be just like pledges in the dorms. 
They can eat here any time they want to and the 
house is open any time they want to be here," Hahn 
said. 

Unlike the Kappa Alpha Theta sorority, the Alpha 
Delta Pi soroity has obtained an annex because the 
sorority pledged more women than could be ac- 
commodated in the house, according to Laura Stuck, 
Alpha Delta Pi president and junior in dietetics. 

The ADPi annex will be an apartment complex 
which is being built near the corner of Sunset and 
Anderson. Twelve women will live in the complex 



next semester with four girls in each room. An- 
nexation will be rotated every eight weeks and the 
women will be expected to come to the house for 
lunch, dinner, pick up mail, study, etc. 

only WOMEN living in the house for at least one 
semester may live in the annex, Stuck said. 

The chapter was urged to annex by its national 
chapter. 

"Every chapter in our province has an annex 
except us. Mrs. Houghton, our province president, 
says it's going well at Tau (KU) and wanted us to try 
it," said Ellen Lehman, ADPi efficiency vice 
president. 

Some ADPi's are skeptical as to whether they'd 
live in the annex because of the hassles of walking 
back and forth to the house. Many believe the reason 
they joined a sorority was partially because they 
wanted the house atmosphere which may be missing 
in the annex. 

"I think it's going to work, but I don't want to live 
there. I'm not the type of person who will come over 
all the time. You need people who will come back. I 
just don't have the time and I don't want to miss out 
on the spur-of-the-moment thing like serenades. In 
the winter time if I got sick, food would be a hassle 
and if I did come over I'd probably overstay my 
limit," said Chris Jones, sophomore in chemical 
engineering. 

SOME WOMEN do not like the eight week policy 
because they will have to move in and others will 
move out at midterm during tests. Others disagree. 

"If I was living there for an entire semester, I 
wouldn't do it. I'm meeting more people this way, I 
picked the first eight weeks because it will be nicer 
weather and easier to come over to eat, but it'll also 
be tempting to buy things and put it in the 
refrigerator," said Lisa Shideler, sophomore in 
interior design. 

But the women moving to the annex next semester 
are excited about being the first ones to annex. 

"I'm excited because we'll be the first ones to 
experiment with it. We'll only be there for eight 
weeks— that's nothing detrimental. I won't get out of 
touch with the house," said Cheryl Murray, 
sophomore in home economics education. 

Lehmann said there are always problems with the 
instigation of an annex. The house will have to work 
to make sure the girls in the annex will be as com- 
fortable as those living in the house. 



Improvements in line for Jardine 



( Continued from p.l ) 

"We are working on weather 
conditioning Jardine with windows 
and doors now," he said. "There 
are many things that need to be 
done." 

CATRELL SAID money made 
from these living systems is used 
for almost everything with which 
Housing operates, including lawn 
mowers, snow scrapers and 
elevators. 

David Brown, senior in animal 
science and one of the mayors of 
Jardine, said he believes all the 
living groups under the housing 
department should carry their own 
weight financially. 

"I could think of a lot of things 
we could use out here with 
$75,000," Brown said. 



"We were told there was an 
excess, but we weren't told how 
much, I think a lot of this in- 
formation is kept hidden by 
Housing," he said. "I've got 
nothing against dorm people, but 
there's definitely some changes 
needed to be made in the system." 

Housing sent memos to the 
residents of Jardine saying the 
rent for those having showers 
installed by the department will 
increase $5 to $10 per month until 
the total price of the shower is paid 
for. 

DEBBIE CLARK, senior in 

home economics and resident of 
Jardine, said the money should be 
used for improvements in Jardine. 
"They (housing) are going to 
charge the apartments that want 



showers $5 to $10 extra a month," 
Clark said. "If they have that 
much money, I don't think this is 
necessary." 

Clark said the rent for Jardine is 
reasonable, but there are many 
improvements that could be made. 

One resident of Jardine, who 
asked not to be identified, said 
Jardine is becoming rundown in 
many ways. 

"I'm not opposed to a rent in- 
crease, but I would like to see some 
improvements made," she said. "I 
don't mind footing the bill for 
dorms, but I don't think our im- 
provements should come out of our 
own pockets." 



TRANSPLANT 
KIDNE 



DONT 
BURY 
THEM 



Hey, did you 

know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 





TM 

I trrr Puhltc l.ct'lurr 

J^ H> ■ Tr»clt*f «f I he 

MrdilalHin IVnur jm 



The Transcendental Meditation 
Program as taught by Maharishi 
Mahesh Yogi is a simple, natural 
scientifically verified technique 
which develops clarity of mind 
and provides deep rest to mind 
and body resulting in more 
energetic, enjoyable activity. 

Monday, May 8, 8 p.m. in 

vidi.^. i** tw Room 207 Union 

Fwmacr of the TM praffraro 

Introductory Lecture 
Thursday, May 11, 8p.m. in Room 204 -Union 

Preparatory Lecture 

TraiiMM'iich'iilail \l<Mli fail ion 

A tjiltmattc pra*T*m for Iht full dn t lopmrnl of Iht imH»k)u»l 




Applications 

for the paid position of 
Advertising Salespersons 

of the 

K-State Collegian 

Summer and Fall Staff 

are available in Kedzie 103 

Deadline Thursday, May 11 5:00 p.m. 



IF YOU HAVENT BEEN TO... 

mm 



YOU HAVEN'T BEEN TO AGGIEVILLEI 

Clip This And Join The 
Crowd At Mr. K's This Weekend! 




. . . JUST OUR WAV OF SAYING "THANKS. KSU! " 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fit, May &. 1971 



i — Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

Round two at Kent State 

KENT, Ohio— Campus security guards tossed 
tear gas near demonstrators trying to tear down a 
fence Thursday at the end of a march com- 
memorating the May 4, 1970, killing of four persons 
and the wounding of nine during an antiwar rally 
at Kent State University. 

Shortly before 5 : 30 p.m. , at the end of the march, 
about 250 persons gathered at the site of the 
shootings and moved toward the construction site 
of a nearby gymnasium annex. A few of the 
demonstrators tried to push down the 10-foot-high 
fence around the annex as security guards 
wearing shielded helmets threw three or four 
canisters of tear gas. 

Flood recedes, leaves 4 dead 

NEW ORLEANS, La.— Roads were clogged with 
abandoned cars Thursday and snakes slithered 
through the streets as floodwaters receded from 
one of the area's worst rainstorms in 50 years. The 
deluge was blamed for four deaths and an 
estimated $60 million damage. 

Water remained a problem in suburban com- 
munities with houses still flooded. But conditions 
in most areas eased from Wednesday when ducks 
floated down Canal Street. 

It rained so hard on Wednesday— which 
ironically was national Sun Day— that the National 
Weather Service rain gauge broke after reaching 
8.67 inches in five hours. Unofficial totals hit 10.5 
inches in some areas. Places where floods 
previously were unknown became rivers, carrying 
catamarans and motor boats instead of cars. 

Now comes the great cleanup. President Carter 
declared the metropolitan region a disaster area 
Thursday, making federal loans and aid available. 
Insurance agents are as flooded with claims as 
their policy holders were with water. 

Tornado rips school apart 

CLEARWATER, Fla.— A tornado cut a swath 
through an elementary school Thursday, ripping 
away walls and roofing as terrified children ran 
for safety. At least two youngsters were killed, 
including one celebrating his sixth birthday, and 94 
persons were injured. 

After tearing through the High Point Elemen- 
tary School shortly before noon, the twister 
skipped into a nearby high school vocational 
facility, then hit a trailer park and upended a half- 
dozen mobile homes. 

It was the worst of several tornadoes that hit 
Florida, causing power outages and heavy 
damage at Gainesville, disrupting an airport at 
Sebring and flipping a truck trailer on a highway 
near Kenansville. 

Reporters at the scene said at least 12 
classrooms were damaged in the school, which 
was occupied by 600 youngsters in grades one 
through six. 

Afghanistan seizes property 

KABUD, Afghanistan— As its first act, 
Afghanistan's new government has nationalized 
the property of the late President Mohammed 
Daoud. 

The ruling revolutionary council, which over- 
threw Daoud in a bloody upheaval last week, said 
his property and that of his family was seized 
because it had been "robbed from the working 
people of Afghanistan." 

The council said it would continue to respect the 
principle of private property. But it said Daoud's 
wealth had been acquired in violation of "moral 
criteria and the Islam religion," and that his goods 
"belong to the people of Afghanistan, to the public 
treasury, and they are announced as 
nationalized." 



Local Forecast 

Today will be cloudy and cool with intermittent light 
rain and highs in the 7 low 50s. Lows tonight will be around 
40, and tomorrow holds no promise of reprieve from this 
spring's dreariness. 



Campus Bulletin 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 
UFM BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION open 
house and crafts fair will be noon to 6 p.m., 
loday and and 10 a.m to * p.m. May 6 at 1H1 
Tnurston. 

SUNFLOWER RUGBY TOURNAMENT will 
be at Tuttle Creek, below the tubes, all day 
May A and 7. 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 

Senate wraps up 
year's meetings 

(Continued from p.l> 
dolyn Macon were recommended 
as non-voting alternate members. 

The recommendations were 
made by a selection committee 
appointed by Sam Brownback, 
student body president. Under the 
Student Governing Association 
Constitution, the student body 
president recommends for council 
members who must be approved 
by senate. 

Rex Matlack, in charge of the 
selections committee, said three of 
the 22 applicants for IAC were 
women, and none were qualified to 
be appointed to the council as a 
voting member. 

"I feel we selected the three best 
voting members we could," 
Matlack said. 

Brownback must appoint 
another selection committee to 
interview applicants for IAC if the 
council is to have student 
representatives, according to 
Matlack. 

Brownback was out of town and 
unavailable for comment. 

For recommended members to 
be approved by senate, a special 
meeting before the end of the 
semester is necessary, said Mick 
Morrell, senate chairman. 

In other senate action last night, 
senate passed a bill urging 
President Duane Acker to re- 
evaluate the perfomance of IAC, 
citing confusion and dissatisfaction 
within the council and the 
University that precludes con- 
structive and effective ad- 
ministration of intercollegiate 
atheltics at K State 



PROGRAM tN DIETETICS applications are 
being taken In Justin 10? through May 13 

PRIDETTE DRILL TEAM tryouts are In 
A hear n Fleldhouse today. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for tall 
1971 are available in the Panheilenle office. 
Holt i HOB Deadline for registration I* July 
IS. 

TODAY 
NftM AND FORESTRY CLUBS will meet at 
Call Hall at S:30p,m for picnic. 

LITTLE SI STER S OF ATME NA Will meet at 
the AK L house alt 3 : * p m to go to Tuttle. 

UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES BOARD Will 
meet In the SGS conference room at 11 :30 am, 

ETA KAPPA NU will meet at Dr Lenhert's 
larm at 5 p.m. for picnic. 

INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND 
ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS will meet at 
Dr. Lenhert's tarm at S p.m. for picnic. 

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY annual 
spring picnic will be at Tuttle puddle, south of 
the tubes, at S p.m. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL announces the final 
oral defense of the doctoral dissertations of 
Larry Blumeerg In Holton 101 at 1 :30 p.m.; 
and Mark Reaves in Union 705C at noon. 

HOME ECONOMICS STUDENTS Will meet 
with candidate for the position of assistant 
dean in Justin I«» at * l 30 p.m. 

AIIE will meet at Tuttle Creek, below tha 
tubes, at 4:30 p.m. tor picnic 

INTER VARSITY CHRISTIAN 

F ELLOWSH l P will meet in Union II I at 7 p.m. 

CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST Will 
meet In the Union Big • room at 7 p.m. 

FONE party will be at Lli's at I p.m. Call 
the FONE, S31-&56S for more Information. 

MECHA will meet In ttrte Union Little 
Theatre at 7 p.m. for music and dance by 
doradus Admission is free. 

SATURDAY 
AUSA picnic will beat Pillsbury Crossing at 
It a.m. 

PI KAPPA PHI LITTLE SISTERS will have 
a car wash at the First National Bank at 1 p.m. 
Proceeds go tor playground equipment for the 
handicapped. 



BLOCK A BRIDLE will meet in Weber 107 at 
7:30 p.m. 

KANSAS STATE SPORTS CAR CLUI will 
meet in the Union parking lot at » p.m. for 

rally. 

SUNOAY 
AG ECON CLUB steak try will be at S p.m. 
Tickets are on tale In Waters 343. 

VAN ZiLE GERIATRIC SOCIETY Will meet 
at McDonald's at 7 : 30 p. m. for Unformel 

ALPHA CHI SIGMA will meet at the east 
side of Wlllard Hall at 10*5 a.m. to leave for 
Lawrence for picnic and soft bat I game. 

K-tAiRES will meet in the Union KSU 
rooms at 7 p.m. Elections will be held. 

KAPPA SIGMA STARDUSTERS will meet 
at the Kappa Sigma house at I p. m. 

asme SWE PICNIC will be at Tuttle, below 
the lubes, at 3:30 p.m. Tickets are available 
for I3.7S In ME office or from any officer. 

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL Will meet at Tuttle 
Creek at 3: 30 for picnic. 

PHI UPSILON OMICRON Will meet at 
Tuttle Cove at S p.m. for picnic. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT will 
meet at the UMHE building. 1031 Denlson at S 
p.m. tor dinner and meeting. 

SHIRE OF THE SPINNING WINDS will 
meet at the UMHE building at a p.m. for 
festival and semester wrap up 

MONDAY 
INTERNATIONAL MEDITATION 
SOCIETY will meet in Union 107 at I p.m. lor 
introductory presentation. 

KSU ORIENTEERING CLUB will meet in 
Military Science 11 ata:30 p.m. for elections. 

MORTAR BOARD will meet in Boyd Hall 

living room at 10:30 p.m. 

LATIN AMERICAN TABLE will meet In 
union Stateroom 1 at 11:30 a.m. for program 
on Costa Rica. 

DELTA PSI KAPPA will meet in Union 306 
at 7 p.m. 

HOME ECONOMICS COUNCIL will meet in 
Hoffman Lounge, Justin Hall at 6 :30 p.m. 

ALPHA ZETA will meet in the Union Big 8 
room at 7 p.m. 



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Robert Shaw Bruce Dern 

f OiQLM HALL 



Sunday 



In everyone's life there's a 

SUMMER OF 42 




—Opinions — 

Afti< 1*1 appearing on inn pift da not nicauaniy raprttent the entire Cellegien 
itail or Ihr Board ol Student Publication* 



Growing 
by learning 

Life-long learning is an entity which is necessary in 
the overall betterment of this nation. 

LEARNING should not cease after graduation, and 
this is one of society's needs to which organizations 
like the University for Man (UFM) attend. 

K-State students and residents of Manhattan are 
lucky to have such an organization at their disposal, 
and it is only fitting that they take time to honor UFM 
in their own way as it celebrates its tenth anniversary 
this Saturday. 

TEN YEARS ago, UFM started out with just seven 
classes and 50 people enrolled in them. 

Today, the free university offers about 250 classes 
each semester and enrolls between 4,000 and 5,000 
people per semester three times a year. 

UFM moved to its new location at 1221 Thurston last 
September and is striving to raise enough funds to 
maintain its present quality, and complete 
renovations on the building. 

SATURDAY, the UFM staff will have an open house 
to celebrate their 10 years of providing the campus 
and the community with an alternative to traditional 
learning. 

UFM is a significant and valuable addition to K- 
State and Manhattan, and Saturday is a good op- 
portunity to show appreciation. 

VELINA HOUSTON 

Editorial Editor 

Letters to the editor 



Complaints 



Editor, 



Nearly everyone who has ever 
had contact with Student Senate 
would agree that it is a petty body 
in many ways, made up of people 
who are uninformed, uninterested 
and incompetent in several areas 
which the body is involved. 
Individual ethics may not be the 
best, we may be inarticulate and 
our judgment is open to question, 
but let's not combine issues. Even 
the most inept and shallow people 
can, at times, offer justified 
criticism. As public officials, we 
must accept and face criticism ; as 
a public institution, the Collegian 
must accept and evaluate the 
criticism it receives without at- 
tacking the source— and I think the 
Collegian certainly deserves its 
share of criticism. 

Regardless of who says it, the 
point remains that the Collegian 
does not meet the needs of the 
student body as well as it should. 
Gone are the days of the cub 
reporter hustling to find a story 
anywhere within the community 
the paper serves (in this case, the 
campus). 

The point can be made that the 
Collegian is operated by amateurs, 
and that we should patiently 
tolerate their shortcomings. But 
we are dealing with paid 



professionals who were chosen for 
their knowledge, and ad- 
ministrative and organizational 
ability. It's inexcusable that 
newsworthy events are not tran- 
slated into news stories. 

Granted, their pay is not exor- 
bitant considering the hours they 
work, but their monthly pay check 
is one most students would envy. 
Their student-funded salaries 
obligate them to perform to a 
standard far above that of the 
volunteer student. I don't see the 
Collegian performing to that 
standard. 

What has happened to 
professionalism in students— that 
is, earning one's student-paid 
wages, being responsive to campus 
needs and being receptive to 
criticism. Much blame has to fall 
on the Board of Student 
Publications— the student-elected 
board which oversees the 
Collegian. Too often In the past it 
has been ineffective and unin- 
volved— a stepping stone to the 
editor's job. This year's board 
shows good signs of changing that, 
but change could be difficult if the 
Collegian staff continues to deny 
that what it provides might not be 
what the students want. 

Ted Knopp 
College of Agriculture senator 



Kansas State Collegian 

Friday, May 5, 1978 

THE COLLEGIAN It publitDad by Student Publication*, Inc.. Kanui State University, 
daily txtept Saturday*. Sunday*, holiday! and vacation period*. 

OFF ICE I are m the north wing of Kedde Halt, phone 532 *sss 

second CLASS poitas • said at Manhattan . Kanui MM . Publication No. J» int. 

SUBSCRIPTION BATES 

US, one calendar year; %' X. one semester 

THE COLLEGIAN functions <n a legally autonomous relationship with the University 
and is written and edited by student* lerving the Unlver»lty community. 

Chris Williams, Editor 
Mark Tindle. Advertiilng Manager 



-»'*^* , >'» 



fc. «a» ~% - \ " ~ _ " **. 





OJHRBOYB 



Grant Sanborn 



Out of the closet, finally 



It is near the end of the semester and it will be 
difficult for any of you to respond. So I'm going to 
force this on you. 

I have a confession to make. I am a latent 
heterosexual. 

Now I know there are a bunch of boys sitting with 
boys in the Union and girls sitting with girls 
(probably playing spades) and reading this and 
snickering and telling tasteless jokes about my 
sexual preference. 

As long as I am making newsworthy confessions 
here, I'll give you all something else to snicker 
about. I am a Presbyterian. 

A lot of you probably think a Presbyterian should 
not be allowed to be on the Collegian staff. Boy, are 
you wrong. 

THIS IS A FREE country, folks, and if you don't 
like a Presbyterian on the Collegian staff, that's just 
tough. It's a tough business. 

I for one am sick and tired of all the coverage the 
Collegian is giving everyone else. Presbyterian 
heterosexuals get nothing. My wife is sick of it too. 
But you don't care, do you? 

When I was young, my father used to make me go 
fishing and hunting with him. He made me play 
baseball. He encouraged me to date (girls) when I 
reached the age of 16. Heterosexual girls were hard 
to find. But my father gave me the encouragement I 
needed to keep searching until I found one. 

My parents are both heterosexual and they have 
encouraged me in this direction. Little did they Know 
the trouble it would eventually cause me. 

I HAVE BEEN the butt of tasteless jokes for too 
long. People call me a "hetero" and sneer "boy- 
lover" at my wife. She can't take it anymore. She is 
going back home to her mother. 

Life as a heterosexual is the PITS. When I was in 
grammar school, I didn't get along with the other 
fellows. When I wanted to play football, they wanted 
to play spin-lhe- bottle. 

I have even been going to a psychiatrist to get 
"straightened out." Last week when he made a pass 
at me, I went over the edge. 



So after 22 years of living with heterosexuality, I 
have decided to come out of the closet. Somebody 
needs to stand up for our rights. And I don't mean the 
Fruit-Juice Queen of America. 

Don't get me wrong— I don't want to deprive 
anyone of their rights. I just want to secure my own 
rights. 

I want recognition for all heterosexuals at K-State. 
I want our own Student Union, where we 
heterosexuals can go to just talk boy-girl talk. 

I WANT EQUAL pay for equal jobs. Why should 
gays get more for the same thing? There are a lot of 
very talented interior decorators and hair dressers 
who don't get jobs because of their sexual 
preferences. It makes me so mad I could just spit. 

I have founded an organization of heterosexuals to 
lobby for equal rights at the state house in Topeka. 
(Please send all letters to Governor Bennett.) 

The organization is called "Organized 
Heterosexuals— Benevolent Undergrads Lobbying 
for Liberty" (OH-BULL for short). I was going to 
add "Sexuality Has It Tough," but my partner said 
the initials were tacky. 

My partner, by the way, is a lesbian, Butch Van 
Dyke. 

Butch is just alright She sees the plight of the 
heterosexual and doesn't let her own sexual 
preference get in the way of her fight for liberty 
among all Americans. What a patriot. 

BUTCH IS WILLING to back up anything she 
fights for with brute force, if necessary. 

"I don't care what the gays, lesbians, 
heterosexuals or anyone else think. If they doesn't 
like what I'm doin', I'll stomp em," Butsch said. 
Isn't she an inspiration? Butch is a spike driver for 
the railroad. She can guzzle beer with the best of 
them. I'll bet her mother is proud of her. 

I know I am not the only one who feels this way. 
There are a lot of closet heterosexuals just waiting 
for an opportunity to be heard. A lot of them hang out 
in bars that feature country and western music. 

To those out there who see no escape, fear not. The 
end is near. And the day will come when we can all 
hold our heads high and holler, "OH-BULL!" 



Article misrepresents 
Black Voices 



Editor, 

Regarding the article on the 
program given by the United Black 
Voices on Sunday, April 30, we 
appreciate the space that was 
given, but the content of that space 
was all wrong. 

The writer missed the entire 



The Collegian welcomes 
letters from readers. 

All letters must be signed 
and include the year in school, 
classification and the 
telephone number of the 
writer. 

All letters must be received 
by noon the day before 
publication. 



point of the whole program, what 
was said and the songs that were 
performed. The choir strives to 
show the unity among a large 
group of black students on a 
college campus, the love for one 
another and for their fellow man 
and most important, what should 
have been mentioned in the article, 
is God's love for us and that if we 
give our all over to God— nothing is 
impossible to accomplish. 

Love was the major theme of the 
concert, not ugliness. Too many of 
us stand on pride, principles, 
commitment to friends, 
organizations and ceremonies, 
instead of just being oneself. 
Letting God have full control of our 
lives was what was meant by, 



"getting ugly." For you see God is 
not interested in the outer ap- 
pearance only the inner part— soul 
and heart— is important and the 
deeds we do in his name. 

We invite you and your staff to 
come in on one of our rehearsals 
next fall and maybe it might shed a 
different light on your idea of what 
the choir is. 

The article was offensive and 
misrepresentative of what was 
said and sung Sunday. I contend a 
written retraction or apology is 
needed, 

Deborah Herviey, Director 

United Black Voices 

Freshman In family and 

child development and social work 



KANSAS STATI COUIQIAH, m, May t, 1fT> 



The Chef Cafe 



Competition for Mother's cooking 



ByBIIXNADON 
Staff Writer 

Today marks the last day of 
sanity for the majority of K-Staters 
as the final two weeks of the 1978 
spring semester approach; ready 
to wreak havoc on the digestive 
tracts of unsuspecting 

academians 

Since time will be in short sup- 
ply, the urge to consume anything 

Restaurant Romp 

that is wrapped in cellophane or 
enclosed in cute little petroleum 
containers will overwhelm even 
the most conscientious diner. In 
other words, anything that will fit 
into the oral cavity is likely to be 
tried. 

Aware of this self-destruction of 
the stomach, Restaurant Romp 
combed the vicinity in search of a 
place to eat and run. I regret to 



announce that such a place exists 
in downtown Manhattan. I refer to 
The Chef Cafe, 111 S. Fourth St. 

THE REASON I hesitate to make 
this establishment common 
knowledge is the food is too good, 
and the place only seats 20 people 
at a time. Being a Good Samaritan, 
I will continue this account of THE 
place to go to prepare for a study 
marathon. 

You will have to keep your eyes 
glued to the left as you proceed 
south on Fourth Street. L#ok for an 
unobtrusive neon sign (circa 1940) 
that simply states The Chef Cafe. 
Open from 5a.m. to 8:30 p.m., The 
Chef is a place to go when you are 
seeking shelter from the disease 
called progress. 

Immediately upon entering The 
Chef for the first time a sense of 
paranoia strikes. There are no 
secluded booths; no individual 
tables to practice the social norm 
of impersonality. Everyone sits at 



Karats and carrots push 
wholesale prices higher 

WASHINGTON (AP)-Rapidly rising food costs and sharply higher 
prices for jewelry pushed wholesale prices up 1.3 percent in April for the 
biggest inflationary surge at the wholesale level in more than three 
years, the government said Thursday. 

The price report confirmed fears that inflation is stuck at a very high 
level since wholesale prices have Increased 3.6 percent since the 
beginning of the year. 

Higher wholesale prices are bad news for consumers since they 
eventually result in higher retail prices. Consumer prices already have 
been increasing substantially this year, rising 0.8 percent in March 
alone. 

Wholesale food prices rose another 1.9 percent in April, raising to 6.7 
percent the total increase for the year. There were sharply higher prices 
for processed poultry and pork, fresh fruits and vegetables and dairy 
products. 



i horseshoe-shaped counter that 
has a capacity of 20. Everyone. 

It is a comfortable atmosphere to 
dine in, mainly because there is so 
much to look at. If you don't enjoy 
looking at the variety of diners 
assembled here (people watching), 
the precision of the waitresses as 
they maneuver before your eyes is 
guaranteed to keep your attention. 

THE EXTENSIVE breakfast 
menu is served all day, making 
this the ideal place to visit when 
night and day fade into one. The 
combination of homemade biscuits 
and pan-gravy accompanied by 
sausage is the only way to prepare 
for an English Comp. final. 

The sandwich selection is second 
only to Reynard's (which is the 
king of the hand meal). Priced 
from 90 cents to $1.50, all of the 
sandwiches include potato chips. 
Worthy of mention: the com- 
bination-bacon and ham; the Blue 
Burger— blue cheese atop the 
standard burger, and the reuben on 
wholewheat bread. 

So far, nothing out of the or- 
dinary. Why, then is The Chef 
worthy of mention? As one 
satisfied customer put it, "The 
food tastes more home-cooked than 
athome."Iconcur. 

THE DAILY specials are ac- 
companied by mashed potatoes 
with excellent pan-gravy, choice of 
vegetable or salad, and a roll with 
butter. The main dishes range 
anywhere from chipped beef on 
toast to spaghetti to boiled chicken 
on homemade noodles and roast 
loin of pork with dressing and 
applesauce. 

I should mention that when one 
thinks of applesauce the standard 
variety is of the consistency of 
baby food. Not at the Chef. Slices of 
apples are topped with a sweet 



sauce that is the kind to write home 
about. 

There are little things that make 
The Chef a place to go when you 
are marginally hungry. I am 
referring to the pies. Nowhere can 
you find a slice of double-crust pie 
for 40 to 60 cents, except at The 
Chef. 

The Chef has a novel way of 
making a profit with only 20 chairs. 
They are fast. We had no sooner 
finished reading the menu when 
our dinner arrived. Time elapsed: 
two minutes. 

Take a chance when you're 
craving for a home-cooked meal 
and time is at a minimum. The 
Chef Cafe will quelch any hunger 
pains, if you're not afraid of sitting 
at the counter. 




GET ON THE 



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Good Friday, May 5 
thru Sunday, May 7 

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Be sure to join us 3 p.m. today at 

AGGIEVILLE SKELLY, nth & Mom 

and get your FM94/Dr. Pepper Frisbee and window stickers 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frf, May 5, IftTS 



Test to check kids' ABCs 
in 2-year Kansas program 



TOPEKA (AP)-Gov. Robert 
Bennett signed into law Thursday a 
bill establishing competency 
testing of Kansas school children 
on a trial basis. 

He said the measure, once killed 
in the state Senate but resurrected 
and passed last week as the 1978 
session concluded, "recognizes the 
need for increased accountability 
of education." 

The governor, who had pushed 
for some kind of beginning 
program, also cited it as ' 'an effort 
to insure mat the dollars being 
spent for education are buying 
quality as well as quantity." 

THE BILL launches next school 
year a two-year pilot testing 
program to determine how well 
children in the elementary and 
secondary grades are learning 
such basic skills as reading and 



arithmetic The examinations will 
be given to students in the second, 
fourth, sixth, eighth and nth grade 
levels. 

It is estimated that the pilot 
program will involve between 25 
and 50 school districts who 
volunteer for it. The testing will be 
administered by the state 
Department of Education. 

Based upon the data gathered 
during the two years the program 
is conducted on a trial basis, 1978- 
79 and 1979-80, the Legislature will 
study results during the 1980 in- 
terim and determine in the 1981 
session whether it wants to im- 
plement a permanent program. 

"I am extremely pleased that the 
Legislature was able to pass this 
bill late in the session," Bennett 
said in a statement announcing he 
had signed the bill. 

"The review will enable the state 



'You have to like his style:' 
FBI tracks down high roller 

KANSAS CITY, Mo. ( AP)— Raymond Allan Williams is ingenious. He 
is imaginative. He is articulate. He is personable. He also is a fugitive 
from the federal penitentiary at Leavenworth. 

Cleverness got him there in the first place. But, that's another story. 
His adventures since driving off from the prison motor pool April 23 still 
has the FBI shaking its head. 

"You have to like his style," one agent summed Williams up, 
reviewing his file. 

After abandoning the prison pickup truck at Kansas City, Mo. , 20 miles 
down the road from Leavenworth, Williams rented a limousine complete 
with chauffeur from a limousine service, and drove to Tulsa, Okla. 

THERE, he rented a suite of rooms for himself, and a separate room 
for his driver. That night, April 24, he called the Kansas City limousine 
service for another day's rental. 

For tax purposes, he asked the service to charge all his expenses on his 
limousine tab. That was agreeable. 

Williams, 31, posing as an entertainment impressario, spread the word 
around the motel in Tulsa that he was giving a reception for a country 
music singer on concert tour. 

Complaining of facilities at the first motel before his so-called 
reception was to come off, he repeated his procedure at another motel, 
referring the charges to his account at the first. 

WEDNESDAY morning, April 26, just ahead of the FBI, Williams 
checked out, went to the airport where he bought a two-engine private 
plane on credit, and hired a pilot to fly him to Dallas. 

The FBI caught up with him there, and he was awaiting return to 
Leavenworth as authorities attempted to add up the bills. 

Williams was serving a five-year sentence for car theft when he 
walked away from the prison. He was transferred to the honor farm 
March 2, and would have been eligible for parole in October. 







'HomeoitheFishbowl" 



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14 M.25 Pitchers 
4-7 $ 1.50 Pitchers 
1-7 50 c fishbowls 

Mel's 



111 S. 3rd 



to determine if pupils are 
satisfactorily demonstrating 
competency in the basic skills as a 
part of the consideration for 
establishment of a statewide 
system of competency-based 
education." 

THE COMPETENCY-BASED 

education bill generated con- 
siderable opposition during the 
1978 legislative session. At one 
point, the bill died in the Senate. 

However, the Senate voted to 
reconsider its action last week and 
the measure was approved and 
sent to Bennett. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, f n., May 5, 1t78 



U.S. offers Thailand arms 
in peace-insurance move 



BANGKOK, Thailand (API-Vice President 
Walter Mondale promised new warplanes and 
reaffirmed an American commitment to defend 
Southeast Aala In talks with Thailand's leader 
Thursday. 

Mondale also said the United States would accept 
tens of thousands more Indochina refugees. 

"Our own peace depends on the Pacific area," 
Mondale declared in a champagne toast at a state 
dinner. 

Prime Minister Kriangsak Chomanan, in his toast, 
praised the U.S. decision to take in more refugees, 
saying it reflects President Carter's "concern for 
human rights and high standard of morality." 

AFTER a two-hour meeting with the vice 
president, Kriangsak said Mondale told him 
Washington would honor the 1954 Manila Pact and its 
protocols, which pledge the United States to defend 
Southeast Asia against "armed Communist 
aggression." 

Thailand served as a major rear base for 
American forces in the Indochina War, and since the 

Performance compared to Nixon's 



Communist victories three years ago Thai officials 
have been concerned that the U.S. commitment to 
this country might be fading. 

The Bangkok government is troubled by Com- 
munist insurgents in the countryside and by an often- 
bloody border dispute with Communist Cambodia. 

AN OFFICIAL in the Mondale party said the Thais 
were promised 18 more F-SE Jet fighter-bombers for 
170-190 million, the financing to be worked out later. 
The Thais also would like U.S. military credits ex- 
panded. 

Mondale's press secretary, Albert Eisele, said 
Mondale told Kriangsak the United States would 
open its doors to 25,000 more Indochinese refugees a 
year for an indefinite period. Most of them will come 
from among Vietnamese, Cambodians and Laotians 
who have fled to Thailand. 

Carter administration officials say the White 
House will submit legislation to Congress to 
authorize such a long-term increase in the number of 
refugees to be accepted, but a U.S. Embassy refugee 
officer here said the program could begin soon. 



Carter's job rating down in poll 



NEW YORK <AP) — Americans 
think President Carter is an 
honest, hard-working man, but 
they don't think he has gotten 
much done as president. 

That's the finding of the latest 
Associated Press-NBC News poll, 
taken this week. 

Moreover, Carter's job rating 
has plummeted once again, with 
Americans' judgment of his per- 
formance at levels touched only by 
Richard Nixon among recent 
occupants of the Oval Office. 

Only 29 percent of those 
questioned said Carter has done a 
good or excellent job in office, 
compared with 69 percent who 
rated his work as fair or poor. Two 
percent were undecided in the 
telephone interviews conducted 
Monday and Tuesday . 

That is down four points since the 
last AP-NBC News poll in March. 

A QUESTION similar to the AP- 
NBC News wording has been asked 
in recent years by pollster Louis 
Harris. The current AP-NBC News 
rating on Carter is lower than the 
lowest point found by Harris on 
either Lyndon Johnson or Gerald 
Ford. Only Nixon's 71-26 negative 



rating in March 1974 is lower than 
Carter's current rating. 

Asked about specific areas, the 
public's rating of Carter dropped in 
foreign affairs, energy and the 
economy. 

The poll was taken before the 
government released its latest 
finding of a major jump in 
wholesale prices and before Carter 
began his fence-mending tour to 
Western states. 

And these declines came despite 
Carter's first major foreign policy 
victory— Senate approval of the 
Panama Canal treaties— and 
despite settlement of the coal 
strike and announcement of his 
anti-inflation program. 

About 80 percent of the 1,600 
adults interviewed agreed with 
statements that Carter is honest 
and that he is hard-working. Only 
about 14 percent disagreed with 
either statement. 

But 63 percent disagreed with the 
statement: "As president, Jimmy 
Carter has shown that he can get 
things done." Thirty-one percent 
agreed with the statement and 6 
percent were undecided. 



FIGHTING INFLATION was 



one major area where the poll 
found public sentiment that Carter 
has not done enough. 

While about two-thirds of the 
people say that a president has the 
power to deal with inflation, only 
about a quarter of those in- 
terviewed said Carter is doing 
enough to fight inflation and 68 
percent said he was not doing 
enough. Eight percent were un- 
decided. 

People's trust in Carter to do 
what's right also has sunk in the 
last four months. Only 40 percent 
now say they trust Carter to do the 
right thing at least most of the 
time. That's down from 57 percent 
in January. 

Those who say Carter can be 
trusted only some of the time or 
almost never now stands at 56 
percent, up from 40 percent. 

As with any sample survey, the 
results of the AP-NBC News polls 
could differ from the results of 
interviews with all Americans 
because of chance variations in the 
sample. For polls with 1,600 in- 
terviews, the results should vary 
no more than three percentage 
points either way because of 
sample errors. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frl., May 5,1978 



Financial holdings of House members 
show diversified outside interests 



SEIKO 



WASHINGTON (AP)— About 
one-third of House members have 
$100,000 or more in outside 
financial interests and several 
have portfolios so diversified that 
many votes they cast could affect 
their finances, House records 
show. 

Only 22 members reported they 
had no significant income outside 
their basic $57,500 congressional 
salary. 

Several reported they were 
heavily in debt. Rep. Fermand St. 
Germain, who heads a House 
subcommittee that oversees 
banking practices, disclosed debts 
of more than $500,000. The debts 
apparently are secured by five 



commercial properties which he 
owns and rents. 

The first detailed look at the 
financial holdings of the 435 House 
members showed that 153 had 
financial interests of more than 
$100,000, excluding personal 
residences. 

IT DID NOT, however, show 
which members of Congress were 
millionaires. Members were 
required only to state whether 
their holdings in any one company 
exceeded certain limits. There was 
no requirement that they state how 
much those holdings actually were. 

As a result, Rep. Frederick 
Richmond (R-N.Y.), who has said 



Government may ban exports 
of cancer-causing sleepwear 

WASHINGTON (AP)— The government is moving to ban exports of 
U.S. -made children's sleepwear containing Tris, a flame retardant 
linked to cancer that cannot be sold legally in the United States. 

Commissioner Edith Barksdale Sloan of the Consumer Product Safety 
Commission insisted on a quick vote to ban exports because of reports 
that manufacturers are dumping the sleepwear abroad, a commission 
source said Thursday. 

The source, who declined to be named, said the vote would almost 
certainly be in favor of the baa 

THE COMMISSION voted unanimously on April 7 last year to ban 
domestic sales of children's sleepwear containing Tris. But in October it 
decided it did not have jurisdiction to forbid exportation of Tris-treated 
garments and required only labels on the exports. 

The October vote was 3 to 1 with David Pittle the dissenter. Since then, 
one of the members of the majority has left the commission and two new 
commissioners, including Sloan, have taken office. 

The source said Pittle, Sloan and Susan King, the other new com- 
missioner, are expected to vote to ban the exports. The legal question is 
whether the commission has jurisdiction to regulate the export of any 
product originally intended for sale in the United States. 

The vote had been scheduled for a commission meeting next Thur- 
sday, but Sloan urged an immediate vote. 



previously that he is a millionaire, 
was shown only as having more 
than a $100,000 interest in Walco 
National Corp., in which he owns 
750,062 shares, and more than a 
$100,000 interest in Walco-Linck 
Corp., in which he holds 87'^ 
shares. 

The financial statements of 
several members read like a blue 
chip index of the stock exchange. 
Several congressmen held such 
diverse financial interests that 
many of their votes were on issues 
that could affect their finances. 

SEVERAL others who held only 
limited stocks also had legislative 
responsibilities that placed them in 
a position of voting on matters in 
which they held an interest. 

Rep. Richard Boiling (D-Mo.), a 
senior member of the House 
Energy Committee, reported that 
he had between $15,000 and $50,000 
in Standard Oil of California stock 
and between $50,000 and $100,000 in 
Texaco stock. 

He also reported between $15,000 
and $50,000 in General Motors 
Corp. stock. General Motors has a 
large stake in the outcome of any 
energy legislation since its 
products use a sizable portion of 
the nation's gasoline supply. 

Several congressmen listed 
large debts. 

CHAIRMAN Jack Brooks (D- 
Texas), of the House Government 
Operations Committee, listed 
debts of at least $365,000 and 
holdings approaching $1 million. 

Rep. Charles Diggs (D-Mich.) 
indicted on charges of taking staff 
kickbacks to help pay debts, 
reported almost no outside 
finances and four debts totaling at 
least $20,000. 



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'The friendly store with the sliding door" 



MARCHING BAND 

Attention 

Band members, Flags, Twirlers, Pridettes 

old and new 
Cheerleaders and Yell leaders 

K-State Marching Band May Daze Festival 

Sat., May 6th, 1 978 

2:00— Film in Band Room 
3:00- Picnic at Turtle Puddle 

Here's your chance to see what you look like wearing a trash bag. We'll 
show the film we made last year and then go to the lake for all the fun, food, 
jocundity, and Boo- Yea you can hold. 

Let's get together again once more before summer 



DON'T MISS IT! 



K-State marching bag and Boo- Yea Band. 





KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, FrL.MayB.1tn 




Plant Test 



Photo by Sunn Pf«nntull«r 



A student in Paul Bowles' woody plant material class studies a leafy specimen In 
an effort to determine Its name as part of a weekly test she took Thursday. 



% oz. Living World Flake Food 
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10 gallon Forty Fathoms Salt Mix 
25 gallon Forty Fathoms Salt Mix 

16 oz. O'Dell Carbon 
Spot Dynatomic I Pump 



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1.35 

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French Fries 
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Z $142 

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Brothers' 



PRESENTS: 

ONCE AGAIN FOR YOUR 
SENSORY STIMULATION. . . 

'South of the Tracks" 1 

—Country Rock— 
TODAY: 

TG1F with The Band 

3:30-5:30 (No Cover) 

$1.50 Pitchers— 3W Steins 

Free Popcorn with Pitcher 

Purchase 

1:00-7:00 

TONIGHT: 

land plays 8:30~Qosa 
(M.50 Covtr) 
The best TGIF in town— and 
we've got LIVE MUSIC I You 
can't beat that with a stick! 



The Puffin fare 
for youths. 




One of the first things 
young Puffins team to do 
is fly Icelandic. 
Beginning April 1, 
1978. Icelandic will 
fly any youth (Puffin 
or person) from 12 
thru 23 years old 
roundtrip from New 
York to Luxembourg 
for just $400. $*;«> 
from Chicago, Re- 
turn tickets ai 
good for a full 
year Fares 
subject to 
change 
Book 
anytime 



But there's more to 
Icelandic than just 
low (ares. 

You II get a 
great dinner and 
excellent service 
on your trip. And 
Icelandic will 
set you down 
right in the mid- 
dle of the Euro- 
pean Continent, 
where you'll be 
just hours away by 
train from Europe's 
most famous 
landmarks. 
So take a travel 
tip from Iceland's 
favorite bird. 

Lean) to fly Icelandic. 
See your travel 
agent. Or write 
Dept. # JSj, 
Icelandic Airlines, 
P.O. Box 105. 
j Wesl Hempstead, 
N.Y. 11552. Call 
800-555-1212 for 
loll-free number 
in your area. 



$345 

MS day APEX*** 

$400 



Ki>undtripl4-45Jnv.\l*KXfvirefr«itnN.Y.' 



Roundtrip With hire.tioud thru a^e 2.1- 

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prn.Mii <k'|i.ulul<- ,!F«1 JJ.wl I' ■' » 'I run mln i !■( o-*'rvat« m 

VI'KX I.ifi flit' tiirJwr_L_l^Zj! 



10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frl..M«y 5, 1978 



front Hmu 




Twin House:' Pleasant surprise 
featuring jazz with two of a kind 



By SCOTT FARINA 
Contributing Writer 

There is nothing like a pleasant 
surprise every so often to help keep 
the faith. In terms of dealing with 
record companies, surprise means 
discovering an album that, by the 
common theories of the market- 
place, should not have been 
released at all ; sales are bound to 
be limited. Such a surprise is 
"Twin House," a recent release by 
Larry Coryell and Philip 
Catherine. 

This album features an acoustic 
guitar duo. That's it. No rvthym 
section, no horns or strings, no 
dumb background singers. Just 
two guitars with occasional 
overdubs for a fuller sound. 

CORYELL is a young, Texas- 
born player who owes as much to 
rock as he does to jazz. Throughout 
his erratically-brilliant career, 
Coryell has made his reputation 
primarily as a flashy, energetic 
electric guitarist on solo albums, 
for a time with The Gary Burton 
quartet, and with the fusion band 
Eleventh House. 

Now, like Her hie Hancock and 
Chick Corea and others who have 
toiled in the fusion fields, Coryell is 
returning to simpler sounds. 

Catherine, a Belgian, is not well 
known in the United States, but is 
widely regarded in Erope as a fine 



guitarist. Apparently he's the 
equivalent of our own Joe Pass; an 
acoustic player comfortable with a 
wide range of material. He also 
writes some fine tunes, five of 
which are contained on this record. 
Suprisingly, considering their 
dissimilar backgrounds, the two 
guitarists are quite simpatico. The 
playing styles are dif- 
ferent— Coryell's lines tend to be 
angular, more metallic, while 
Catherine plays smoothly-snaking 
runs around the melody. 



guitars, solos do not stand out, in 
terms of volume, the way they 
would with more conventional 
groups. To fully appreciate the 
consumate musicianship on this 
album, one must listen more in- 
tently than is perhaps normal. The 
extra concentration is worth it. 

So far this album has had 
relatively little notice. It came out 
at the same time another guitar 
duo that features Larry Coryell 
with Steve Kahn did. 




Artists hold fair; 
Mona Lisa presides 

Those in a browsing mood for artwork and antiques this weekend just 
might find what they are looking for at the art fair and auction sponsored 
by the K -State art department. 

Students, faculty and friends in the department have donated their 
artwork and collected antiques to raise money for the Art Scholarship 
Fund, according to Pat Hagan, co-coordinator and assistant professor 
of art. 

"The art scholarships range from $50 to $300," she said "Some go to 
majors who are in the department." 

Hagan also said 25 per cent of the proceeds from the fair and 100 per 
cent of the proceeds from the auction go toward the scholarship fund. 

THE FAIR begins at 10 a.m., Saturday, May 6th and will end around 
four o'clock. The auction starts at l :30 p.m. on Sunday. Also on Sunday, 
the Potters Guild will sell its ceramic works from 9 a.m. until the auction 
begins. Both events will be at West Stadium. 

To enhance the atmosphere of the upcoming happening, the building's 
windows were designed with black and white super graphics. 

"The designing part was done by Dennis Kuronen and his advanced 
graphic design illustration class," Hagan said. "The class also put up the 
windows. 

"The actual work of the panes was done by two of our Design II 
classes. The execution involved two weeks of class work. It took them a 
good morning or so to put ( the art work) up on the windows." 

One window depicts a Mona Lisa theme. This theme portrays the 
purpose of the art fair, Hagan said. People who come to the fair or 
auction will receive this Mona Lisa in a unique context. 

"The Mona Lisa that's in the window is an elongated figure, whereas 
the real Mona Lisa is not," Hagan said. 

ONE OTHER WINDOW reflects an abstract image which captures an 
aerial view of pottery designs, she said. 

"It's a blown- up photo of a table full of ceramics so you're seeing the 
tops and handles of mugs," Hagan said. 

While the event is geared toward art and antiques, it will also feature 
several kinds of activities, Hagan said 

People will have the opportunity to test their talent by creating their 
own artistry. Others might want to try their luck at winning prizes from 
the fishing booth. 

For those who are book -hooked, there will be a variety of reading 
materials available at the book booth to buy or browse, Hagan said. 

Touchstone' magazine: 
Poetry paints pictures 



LISTENING to this album will 
require some changes in your 
usual aural habits, though, unless 
you listen to this type of music 
frequently. Not that the music is 
strange, just the recording. 
Because both artists play acoustic 



One Coryell record is obscuring a 
second Coryell record. There is 
nothing wrong with the Coryell- 
Khan collaboration, but it will be 
the "Twin House" LP with 
Catherine that will most likely 
withstand the test of time. 



Feature Films up and coming; 
recent releases; bargain prices 



By ALLISON ERKELENS 
Arte Editor 

The povies you couldn't afford to see this school 
year because of outrageous admission fees will be on 
campus next year, at about half the price. 

Feature films and Kaleidoscope Films are 
bringing in a lot of recent hits, as well as golden 
oldies but goodies for the student movie-goer. 

To introduce these up-and-coming attractions, 
Feature Films will be doing something new during 
registration. Instead of showing a film on Wed- 
nesday or Thursday of "fill out the form" week, they 
will be running trailers all day, previewing the films 
for the entire semester, according to Kevin Kneisley, 
Feature Films Coordinator for 1978-79. 

Highlighting next years schedule are "The Worlds 
Greatest Lover," "Smokey and the Bandit," 
"Goodbye Girl," "Looking for Mr. Goodbar," "The 
Spy Who Loved Me," "Julia," "Oh God," "Which 
Way is Up," "Heroes," and "Semi-Tough," which 
was especially schedule for the University of Kan- 
sas-K-State game. 



Old favorites also scheduled for the Friday- 
Saturday night showings include "My Fair Lady" 
and "Bambi." 

Older and more popular movies will be running 
Sundays, according to Kneisley, and most are award 
winners. 

Sunday features include "Oliver" "Enter the 
Dragon" and "Bridge Over the River Kwai." 

"We're scheduling a cartoon for every feature," 
Kneisley said. "People enjoy them I think." 

October 19 and 31 will be left open for an all-nighter 
Halloween film to be sponsored by Blue Key for 
homecoming. 

The films this year will also be more widely ad 
vertised, according to Kneisley. 

"We're working with all the distributing com- 
panies and using actual radio spots for KSDB instead 
of them doing it," Kneisley said. 

A ward- winning films at bargain-basement prices; 
not a bad deal at all. The student lives. 



By CAROL WRIGHT 
Collegian Reporter 

If a picture paints a thousand 
words, perhaps Touchstone does 
likewise with its myriad of 
meanings derived from the 
literary and visual arts. 

The 1978 winter-spring issue of 
Touchstone is delightful because it 
captures a variety of themes and 
styles expressed by different ar- 
tists. All of the art, photography, 
prose and poetry done by K-State 
students are enjoyable. 

The poems in memory of Helen 
Williams (who died of cancer last 
semster) reflect the sorrow felt by 
losing someone who gave much 
encouragement to students in the 
writing field. 

Judy Sasse's prose-poem, "The 
Sower (for Helen)" exhibits this 
feeling, especially by her use of the 
following image: 

"And waiting there the lilies 
white breath form a wreath for her 
return." 

THE SATIRE in "Uninvited 
Visitor" by Marilyn McCulley 
conveys a conflict of contrasting 
moods. The procrastination to 
clean up the guest's leftovers after 
a party can be a frustrating and 
trivial task. 

Another enlightening poem is 
"The Hawk" by Ann Carrel: 
"Unmoved by angry rituals of 
wheat... Lord of line and wind torn 
hedge... Suspended on the rim of 
night." 

Ruby Stevens' "Hattie Mae" 
emphasized this character's 
burden of loneliness and solitude. 
It is a poem one can easily identify 
with: "Lonely lives in a railroad 
shack... Ha ttie's so lonely she 
wears black lace" and "Butcher 
knife done carved her... Hattie Mae 
got lonely boned on her face. " 



The quality of attributing human 
emotions to inanimate objects can 
clearly be seen in Jim Karas' 
"Searching." 

THE SHORT STORIES and 

prose are written well, particularly 
"And in The Time of A Dream" by 
Charlen Linn. Highlighted by 
religious undertones, it concerns 
an old man's prophecies or as Linn 
states, "the magic old man of my 
childhood dreams." 
Such undertones symbolize the 




U rKTGfig 

winree & Wire 1078 



prophecies espoused by the creator 
as Linn says in "And he picked up a 
stone with his hands and said, 
'Your life shows great 
promise... Build it to the Lord' " 
and "Unfurl your heart like a great 
sail, to catch the love blowing as 
thewindonthesea." 

Overall, the contents of 
"Touchstone" are done with such 
talent that the artists should be 
applauded for their creativity. 



Bennett says no to move 
for more legislature space 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frf, May S, 1878 



11 



TOPEKA (AP)-Gov. Robert 
Bennett drew the line Thursday on 
the Legislature's continued en- 
croachment into executive branch 
office space in the statehouse. 

He vetoed a bill he said "pur- 
ports to grant to the Legislative 
Coordinating Council full control of 
the assignment of space and 
facilities in the entirety of the state 
Capitol, restrained only by the fact 
that permanent space must be 
available to the governor, 
lieutenant governor and secretary 
of state." 

Bennett also hinted at his news 
conference that he may veto some 
spending programs passed by the 
Ijegislature last week, on grounds 
the state can't afford them and still 
maintain an adequate treasury 
balance. He announced as signed 
into la w a handful of other bills. 

IT'S BEEN a fine idea in recent 
years to give the Legislature 
adequate room "for its effective 
operation," Bennett said. But he 
also noted, "In the process, a good 
portion of this space remains 
vacant and essentially unused 
when the Legislature is not in 
session." 



Added Bennett: 

"There is substantial question in 
my mind as to the propriety of 
further expanding legislative 
space on the first and second floors 
of the state Capitol when in due 
course of lime all space located on 
the third, fourth and fifth floors of 
the Capitol will be available for 
legislative use." 

Bennett said there might be 
merit to a proposal to relocate the 
Department of Administration in 
some other building, but protested 
any plans to remove the Budget 
Division from the statehouse 
because of the close liaison he must 
have with it during annual state 
budget preparation. 

Bennett said he was vetoing the 
bill because it represented a 
unilaterial decision by the 
legislative branch without con- 
sulting the executive branch on use 
of Capitol space. 

THE GOVERNOR said he's 
reached no decision on whether to 
veto a bill greatly expanding the 
state's Homestead Property Tax 
Relief Act, including extending it 
for the first time to low-income 



Club housing pot supporters 
to close for liquor violations 



parents of all ages who support 
children. 

"The casual and almost reckless 
spending of this legislative session 
would make it difficult to continue 
some programs," Bennett told his 
news conference. 

Announced as signed into law 
were bills to: 

—Allow communily junior 
colleges to raise their 1978-79 
budgets by six percent. 

—Require the State Building 
Advisory Commission to submit 
the names of five persons to the 
secretary of administration when 
he selects a new director of ar- 
chitectural services. 

—Allow the Board of Regents to 
redesignate the boundary between 
Fort Hays State University and the 
park area in Fort Hays Military 
Reservation based on the center of 
the channel of Big Creek as of next 
Jan. 1. 

—Abolish the annual state 
census as compiled by the 
Department of Agriculture. 
Starting next year, Kansas will 
rely on federal census figures. 
Bennett called the state census "an 
unnecessary, antiquated mandate 
on local units of government." 

—Allow the city of Wichita to pay 
the tax on wine given to it as a gift 
by its sister city in France to be 
used during a ceremony in 
Wichita. 



MEMORIAL SERVICE 

For Mary Jo King, wife of Ed- 
ward J. King. Services at the 
K.S.U. International Student Cen- 
ter, Mid-Campus Drive and Claflin 
Road. 7 p.m., Friday, May 5, 1978. 

Friends of the International 
Student Center are invited. The 
Center was a gift of the Kings. 

Mrs. King died Wednesday, 
April 26, in Kansas City. 



TOPEKA (AP)— A private club 
which was the scene Feb. 12 of a 
fund-raising party for supporters 
of legislation to reduce criminal 
penalties for possession of 
marijuana will be closed down for 
five days, the Division of Alcoholic 
Beverage Control said. 

Following an ABC ad- 
ministrative hearing Wednesday, 
the club, Mr. Magoo's of Topeka, 
was ordered closed beginning May 
28 and ending June 2, a spokesman 
for the ABC said. 

The agency accused the.-club 
staff of violating state liquor laws 
during the fund-raising event by 
permitting persons who were not 

Judging contest 
set for Saturday 

A livestock-judging contest, 
sponsored by the K-State Block and 
Bridle Club, is scheduled for 7:30 
a.m. Saturday in Weber Arena. 

The livestock judging contest 
will consist of a junior and senior 
division. Students will be asked to 
place live classes of cattle, sheep, 
swine and horses in classes of four. 

Students will be judged by their 
decsions in placing the animals 
and by their reasons as to their 
judging, according to Rich McKee, 
sophomore in animal science, and 
Block and Bridle Club member. 

"I feel this contest gives one 
experience under a time-pressure 
situation of making decisions and 
backing them with valid reasons," 
McKee said. 



members or guests of members to 
purchase liquor. 

PAUL MUXLOW, club owner, 
maintained that any violations 
were unintentional and occurred 
while he was out of town. 

The Feb. 12 party was arranged 
by the Kansas chapter of the 
National Organization for Reform 
of Marijuana Laws (NORML) to 
raise funds for its lobbying effort in 
the Kansas Legislature. 

The bill supported by the 
organization would have reduced 
to a $100 fine the criminal penalty 
for first conviction of possession of 
one ounce or less of marijuana , 

The measure died last week in 
the Senate Federal and State 
Affairs Committee at the end of the 
1978 session. 



Is it true the 
Seniors of 

kkt 

ore 
WILD WOMEN?? 

Prow it Tonight 
at Rowdy Nite 

Be there or be square 





YOUR 

EDUCATION 

DOESN'T 

STOP 

HERE 



Your education doesn't stop with a baccalaureate degree It begins 
there. Once you enter the world of wort*, you will gain valuable ex 
penenee and really discover what Us all about to use what you learned 
in college 

Take the Air Force for example As a commissioned officer youll be 
handed executive responsibility on your very first job. Youll manage 
people and complex systems Youll be expected to perform well, and 
youll be paid well, too It's worth working (or 

You can get there through the Air Force ROTC program. In (act, we 
have a scholarship plan that will net you $100 a month tax free and 
pay for all tuition, books and lab fees And that will (ree you toconcen 
Irate on your studies so you can get well prepared for where you're 
headed 

Check it out Find out how you can get into a "gr adua,e program 
like the Air Force It's a great way to serve your country, and possibly 
find your formal education extended at Air Force expense as well 
For more in formation, contact Captain Grenier, 
Military Science Bldg., Room 108, or call him at (913) 
532-6600. 




ROTC 

Gateway to o great way of life.. 



Every Monday 
Afternoon is 

BARGAIN DAY 

at PUTT-PUTT 

3 Games for $1.00 



Play as many 

wish for f 2. 



games as you 



PUTT-PUTT 



V®j 



COlf COURSES 



forthehinofit! 

Wok on Hwy. 10 

•■Play Today A Chase 

The Blues Away" 

WeslonH.W. 18 



(Uto union bookstore 

mMtooo (Mite 



* *^™ it 





That's right! The Union Bookstore's used 
book program saved K-State students better 
than $250,000.00 this year. That's more than 
$13 60 a student! How did we do it? By using com- 
mon sense. Instead of sending big checks off to 
the publishers for our textbook stock, we prefer 
to put it in your hands in cash when we buy your 
books. It makes sense, the savings add up fast, 
and what's more, we've been doing it for you for 
years As a result, the average students book ex- 
penses are reduced by about one-fifth. 

Here are the details: First, we pay 20% more 
for your books than is currently available at 
other dealers. Second, these exceptionally high 
prices attract a lot of books— literally tons of 
them, so our stocks are the largest in Manhattan, 
bar none! (One out of every three course books 
sold at the Union this year was a used book.) 
With such a high volume of used copies 

k-sta te union 



bookstore 



0301 



available, and since you save twice on used 
books ( once when you but it, and again when you 
sell it) it is easy to see why the net result is such 
a huge savings. It's a fact that the Union puts 
more cash in the hands of K-State students than 
anybody else in the book business. You couldn t 
save more if you bought all new books at 

wholesale! 

So why are we buying this ad? Not just to 
blow our own horn. We figure that if you know 
the facts, you can save yourself a lot of money. 
So we bought this ad to convince you that there 
are only two simple steps to save money on your 

textbooks: 

1. Sell your books at the Union— you save 

because we pay more. 

2. Buy your books at the Union— you save 

because we have more used books. 

So, gather up all those books lying around 
the apartment or dorm room, and sell them at 
the Union (in front of Forum Hall) during Final 
Week. Then, come see us again 
during registration. Remember, we save you 
more, and we can prove it. 



12 



STATE COLLEOIAH, Fft,M«yS,1f7i 



^•— *■*«■ 




MM • 



^S^*/*****^, 



HP*-- **.'-»«'*- 



k?£lSr 












kT^*WS»>rt - 









- ' ^ 



;■ 






*l*^Bfci- .^P^^* 



Easy Does ft 



Pfiolo by Pete Souia 



Not quite at home where the pigeons play, a physical plant worker finds I If eon the 
roof of Farrell Library somewhat shakier than that below. He was part of a crew 
making repairs Thursday. 




Not just a John, an adventure 

NORFOLK, Va. (AP)— Petty officers on board the destroyer 
Conyngham have reported a new duty: checking the bathrooms to cut 
down scribbling on the walls. 

Several petty officers told the Norfolk Virginian-Pilot they had to 
check each stall and keep a log of any graffiti, along with the name of the 
man who wrote it. 

The Atlantic Fleet Surface Force said only that "In an effort to protect 
property, the commanding officer established a watch. The watch was 
maintained one day." 



SLAGLE'S GREENHOUSE 



BLOCK & BRIDLE 

Livestock Judging 

Contest 

SATURDAY, MAY 6 

7:30 A.M. 

Weber 107 

Everyone Welcome 



Flowering annuals— vegetables— perennials 




Country & Western Dance 
Saturday, May 13 

Elks Lodge 
10 p.m.-2 a.m. 

Featuring Country Joy 

Admission H/person 
B.Y.O.B. 



MISSED US ON 
CAMPUS? 

In cose you were unable , 

to see our Detroit Edison ^C~f rUm .Sir; 

Representative on 

Campus, we want you 

to knew we still have 

openings for Engineering 

graduates interested in: 

• Engineering 
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• • Construction 
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Engineering 

• Maintenance Engineering 

• Applied Engineering related to 
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Detroit Edison is a leader In the Electric Power Industry and 
needs your help to solve future energy problems. 

if you have an Electrical, Mechanical. Chemical or Civil 
Engineering degree, please send a detailed resume to: 

DETROIT EDISON COMPANY 

College & Professional Employment 
2000 Second Avenue 
Detroit, Michigan 48226 

An Eaual Opportunity Employer M/F 



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FEELIN' 



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EXERCISE SANDALS 

Look great, feel fantastic in this world 
famous sandal. Exclusive toe crest sculpted 
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Reg. '16.95 ONLY '13.49 




•Downtown 



• Westloop 



•Blue Hills 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frt.,Mayfi,1«7f 



IS 



OMNA favors a limitation 
on expansion of Aggieville 



By DAVE HUGHES 
City Editor 

Residents attending a public 
hearing last night to discuss 
Manhattan's land-use plan for the 
expansion of Aggieville agreed the 
plan should not include expanding 
across 11th Street, 

The meeting was sponsored by 
the Older Manhattan Neigh- 
borhood Association (OMNA) and 
was attended by about 40 persons. 
Manhattan City Planner Gary Stith 
also attended to answer residents' 
questions about the land-use plan. 

Stith said expanding businesses 
across 11th Street would impair its 
traffic carrying capacity. With the 
addition of several business en- 
tranceways along the street the 
traffic would not be able to flow 
easily. 

AESTHETIC reasons for not 
expanding across 11th Street were 
also presented by Stith. He said 
Aggieville gives a "sense of 
arrival" in that a person knows, 



because of its difference from 
other areas, when he has arrived in 
Aggieville. Expanding Aggieville 
across Uth Street would obscure 
that impact, he said. 

Residents agreed with Stith, but 
added that property values east of 
Aggieville would drop if businesses 
were allowed to be located there. 

The proposed changes in the 
land-use plan include three options 
for expansion. 

The first option would allow for 
expansion along Bluemont Ave. 
from Manhattan Ave. to 14th 
Street. The area would be one-half 
block deep. 

Stith favored this option because 
it would do the least amount of 
damage to the area and could still 
be easily identifiable as a part of 
Aggieville. 

The second option calls for the 
same westward expansion as in 
Option I but adds southward and 
eastward expansion. 

THE THIRD option would ex- 



pand Aggieville to fill the entire 
area from 11th to Uth and from 
Bluemont to Fremont. 

Stith said businesses facing the 
city park would not be appropriate. 
He said he believed the existing 
housing across from the park 
provides a better buffer between 
the park and Aggieville. 

The land-use plan sets the policy 
for expansion or use of city land 
but does not mean the land must be 
used for the purposes set down in 
the plan. 

One person, a member of OMNA, 
said Aggieville needed no ex- 
pansion. The member said 
Aggieville was used mainly by 
students and student population 
projections predict a drop in 
University enrollment. With a 
drop, fewer students would use 
Aggieville. 

"Precious few people (other than 
students) in Manhattan use 
Aggieville," the member said. 

• ■ ■ 



NAM A previews job opportunities 
to take agriculture students off farm 



By BECKY DOUDICAN 
Collegian Reporter 

The job market and the op- 
portunites in agriculture were the 
main topics at a program and 
dinner last night for the Great 
Plains Chapter of the National 
Agri-Marketing Association 
(NAMA) Careers Day at the 
Holiday Inn. 

During the program, which was 



attended mainly by students in the 
Agricultural Economics and 
Agricultural Communicators of 
Tomorrow clubs, five represen- 
tatives from the NAMA chapter 
presented short talks on their jobs 
and opportunities in agriculture. 

"There are a lot of potential and 
rewarding jobs in agriculture, said 
Ron Loos, salesman for United 
Beechcraft in Wichita, adding that 



Stocks losing ground; 
Dow Jones at 824.41 

NEW YORK (AP)— The stock market recorded its third straight loss 
Thursday on the news of a big jump in wholesale prices last month 

But after a round of heavy selling at the opening, prices steadied and 
finished well above their early lows. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, off more than 10 points in tne 
first hour, cut its loss to 4.42 points at 824.41 by the close. 

That left the average with a net drop of 19.92 over the last three 
sessions, following a runup of more than 100 points from the end of 
February through May 1. 

The day's volume on the New York Stock Exchange came to 37.52 
million shares, against 37.56 million on Wednesday. 

Before the market opened the government reported that wholesale 
prices of finished goods— the next-to-last link in the distribution chain 
before merchandise is priced for retail sale— jumped 1.3 percent in 

April. , • 

It was the biggest increase in that measure of inflationary pressures in 

more than three years. 

Analysts also said the market's declines of the past two days seemed to 
have convinced many traders that the spring rally that set trading- 
volume records last month had run its course. 

In other news of concern to investors, the dollar declined in foreign 
exchange and several large banks joined in a prime rate increase from 8 
to 8V« percent initiated last Friday by New York's Cha se Manhattan. 

Instructions kill 
renovation plans 

COEUR D'ARLENE, Idaho 
( AP)— The City Council has turned 
down a $12,800 federal grant to 
renovate a fire station after 
receiving a 400-page instruction 
book along with a note saying more 
instructions would follow. 

City Manager Dustin Griffith 
said he discussed the project with 
the fire chief and decided it would 
cost the city more money to 
comply with the rules than the 
grant was worth "in terms of time 
on this project and time lost on 
other projects in the city." 

The U.S. Economic Development 
Administration had approved the 
grant, 



"agriculture is the number one 
industry in the nation." 

RAY PIERCE, editor for the 
High Plains Journal in Dodge City, 
stressed the need for journalists 
who "can put what they need to say 
across," and Don Brown, of the 
Farm Credit Banks of Wichita 
talked about public relations. 

KFDI Radio farm director Rex 
Childs talked about the electronic 
media, saying salaries in that field 
and sales are the highest. Childs 
said a farm broadcaster begins his 
day early ; starting at 5 a.m. 

Childs also encouraged students 
to take advantage of internships 
and said a student "can't expect to 
start at the top," and the smaller 
radio and TV stations are some of 
the "best places to get some good 
experience." 

DURING the program, the 
speakers stressed the need for a 
college chapter of NAMA at K 
State. They encouraged the 
students to think seriously about 
instituting a chapter, as it would 
help them gain information on the 
agricultural industry and job 
opportunities. 

During the social hour which 
followed the program, students 
had an opportunity to visit with and 
ask questions of the chapter 
representation from the 
agricultural marketing field in 
which they were most interested. 



D.E.C. 533-7237 
M and 7-10 p.m. Daily 



1211 Thurston 



DOPE 



on drugs 
The D.E.C. wants to talk. We have Information on legal and illegal 
drugi. No moral rap. For more information, or help with a drug related 
problem, don't hesitate to give us a call. 





<s& 



Study! 

Study! 
Study! 

take a book-break 

at SWANNIE'S 




Every Sunday 5 to 8 p.m. 

Cotton's 

SPAGHETTI 

BUFFET 

All you can eat 
ONLY $2.25 

with salad plate— 12.75 
large salad plate alone — fl.50 




-^w 



Ramada Inn 
7th & Anderson 



Applications are available for 
the 1978-79 Royal Purple Staff 



Positions open: 



— features editor 
— business manager 
—sports editor 
— asst. features editor 
— asst. business editor 



—sports writer 
— staff writer 
— copy reader 
—artist 



Pick up applications in Kedzie 
103 and return by May 10 



READY TO SELL YOUR BOOKS?) 

We are buying between 
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Thursday, May 4 

Friday, May 5 

Saturday, May 6 

Remember this at 




PORCELAINS 

by 

Dale Hartley, 
ceramic artist at 

the ambry gallery 

May7toMay20 



MON.- SAT. 
0130 — 4:30 
THURS. EVE. 
til 8:30pm 



OR BY APPT. 
PHONE: 
532 - 6607 



WEST STADIUM 
ANDERSON and DEN t SON 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fit, May 5. 1978 



New secretary 
will reveal future 
plans on Monday 

TOPEKA (AP)-Jack Brier, 
assistant secretary of state the 
past seven and one-half years, said 
Thursday he will have a statement 
Monday on whether he plans to 
seek the Republican nomination 
for secretary of state in this year's 
primary election. 

Brier, 31, was appointed head of 
the office Thursday by Gov. Robert 
Bennett to serve out the last eight 
months of the term of Elwill 
Shanahan. 

Mrs. Shanahan announced 
Wednesday she is resigning ef- 
fective next Wednesday after 12 
years in the post to retire from 
candidate politics, Brier's ap- 
pointment is effective next Wed- 
nesday. 

Being appointed to the post by 
Bennett is viewed by some as 
giving Brier a headstart on any 
other Republican seeking the of- 
fice, but the governor said the 
appointment should not be viewed 
that way. Bennett said it remains 
up to the state GOP to pick its 
nominee for the post in the Aug. 1 
primary. 

Under a pay bill passed by the 
1978 Legislature, the salary of the 
job is raised from $20,000 a year to 
$27,500 effective nexUanuary, 

The only declared candidate for 
the Democratic candidate for the 
Democratic nomination, Mrs. 
Betty Paxson of Topeka, said she 
thinks Mrs.Shanahan's resignation 
and Brier's appointment will help 
her chances. She said the 
Shanahan name, associated with 
the office for more than 27 years, 
has been a big plus for the GOP in 
keeping the office. 

Paul Shanahan, Mrs. Shanahan's 
first husband, won the office in 
1950, and she was appointed to 
succeed him when he died in 1966. 

Art Fair to boost 
scholarship funds 

Art works by Red Skelton, 
Christo and the late Berger San- 
dzen will be among those auctioned 
at the third annual Scholarship Art 
Pair and Auction Saturday and 
Sunday. 

The art fair which will also 
feature works of K-State students, 
faculty and alumni will be from 10 
a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday outside 
West Stadium and begin at 1:30 
p.m. Sunday. The items to be 
auctioned will be on display from 9 
a.m. to 1 : 30 p.m. on Sunday. The K- 
State Potter's Guild, a student 
organiration will also be selling its 
works at that time. 

Pat Hagan, assistant instructor 
of art, said the fair will be 
exhibiting artists' works in 
painting, print, ceramics and other 
art forms. All proceeds will go the 
to the art scholarship fund. 

THE ART fair will also have a 
book booth where used paperback 
and hardback art books will be sold 
and photo booth where people can 
dress up in costumes and have 
pictures taken. There will also be 
an artist sketching caricatures. 

A "create-your-own" button 
booth for making buttons with 
slogans , a fishing booth in which 
children may fish for prizes, door 
prizes and food booths will be 
available. 

The auction will feature antiques 
and collectables donated by local 
merchants, faculty, students and 
alumni. 

A framed and autographed piece 
of fabric from Christo's "Running 
Fence" and an autographed 
reproduction of Red Skelton's 
"Clown with Cigar" will be auc- 
tioned as will an original 
lithograph by the late Berger 
Sandzen entitled "Pool with 
Trees." 




Buy-Backl 



Here 
are some 

answers to 
often asked questions. 




Question: 
Answer: 



How docs the Union Bookstore determine how much your 
books are worth when you sell them back? 

If the Bookstore has notification from the instructor that the 
books are to he re-adopted for use the next semester, and if the 
Bookstore does not already have a sufficient stock on hand, then 
you will be offered 60 per cent of the publisher's current list price. 

For example: if a book sells for $10.00 new and it meets the 
requirements noted above, the book would be bought from you for 
$6.00. 

If the Bookstore has not received notice that the book will be 
used again, or if It already has a sufficient stock on hand, the book 
would be worth the current wholesale price as Indicated by one of 
the nation's largest jobbers of used textbooks. 

If you have any questions about the price being paid for a text- 
book, the buyer will be happy to answer any questions which you 
may have regarding the price paid. 



Question: 
Answer: 



It 00 per cent the usual price paid 
for textbooks around the country? 

Definitely not. Most stores in the United States pay only 50 per 
cent for books being used again. The Union Bookstore is one of the 
few stores which pays 60 percent. And remember, we pay cash. You 
don't have to take your money out In trade. 



Question: 
Answer 



What about paperbacks? Does the 
60 per cent policy apply to them too? 

Yes. The Union Bookstore does not penalize you on paper- 
backs. If they are being used again, and if the bookstore needs 
them, you will receive 60 per cent of the publisher's list price. 



Question: 
Answer*. 



If the publisher's price has gone up since 1 bought my books, 
will I receive the benefit of that price Increase? 

Yes. For instance, if you bought your book for $9.00 and the 
publisher's list price is now $10.00, you will get $6.00, not $5.40. 



We will buy books: 

TUESDAY, May 9 , 

thru , ' I — 8am to 5pm 

FRIDAY,May12 

SATURDAY,May13Ql0am to 4pm 

MONDAY, Mayl^ _ 

thru I OamtoOpm 

FRIDAY, May 19 

k-state union 




bookstore 



0301 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, FrL, May 8. 1S7S 



IS 




It's post time at 
Kentucky Derby 

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - 
Alydar and Affirmed are set to 
duel in the Kentucky Derby 
Saturday at Churchill Downs in 
what will be the seventh and by far 
the biggest battle of their exciting 
rivalry. 

Sensitive Prince, Believe It and 
seven other 3-year-olds will try to 
make the expected — even hoped- 




PhotO by Bo Rader 



POPPED 
tags out a 

Thursday' 
two clubs 



BY PEPPER...K-State catcher Tim Pepper 
potential scoring run for Emporia State in 
s first game of a doubleheader which the 
split. 



for — confrontation between 
Alydar and Affirmed in the l'/t- 
mile Derby anticlimatic. 

Alydar and Affirmed are each 
unbeaten in four starts this year 
while Sensitive Prince has won all 
five of his 1976 races and also his 
only start as a 2-year-old. Believe 
It has been beaten in three of five 
starts this year, but looked im- 
pressive in winning the Wood 
Memorial April 22 and appears 
ready for a big effort . 

Alydar was made the early even- 
money favorite Thursday even 
though he was beaten by Affirmed 
four times in six meetings. 



Gal tracksters to pull upset? 



The K-State women's track team 
travels to Norman, Oklahoma, 
Friday and Saturday to compete in 
the Big Eight Championships. 

As has been the case in the four 
previous meetings of the Big Eight 
schools, the Wildcats will lead a 
pack of challengers set to take on 
the powerful Iowa State Cyclones. 
The 'Cats ave finished second 
behind the Cyclones all four years. 

"Chances are Iowa State will 
still win the meet and its share of 
individual titles again," said 
Wildcat coach Barry Anderson. 
"But the Cyclones won't pick up 
the easy third and fourth places 
they have in the past. 

"This undoubtedly will be the 
toughest competition we will face 
all year outside of the nationals," 
Anderson said. "The level of 
competition will make this the 
outstanding meet in the Midwest 
this season." 

NOW IN his sixth year at the K- 
State helm, Anderson looks for his 
'Cats to fare best in the sprints, a 
couple of distance events and a 
couple of sprint relays . 

"But we'll have to have balanced 
scoring to do well as a team," 
Anderson said. "We can't afford to 
be shut out in any events. ' ' 

Making up the Wildcat sprint 
field will be veterans Jan Smith, 
Sharon McKee and Pat Osborn, 
along with freshmen Lorraine 
Davidson and Freda Hancock. 

Smith won the 100 yard dash and 
set a Big Eight record back in 1976, 
finished second to Kansas' Sheila 
Calmese over 100 meters a year 
ago, and came in third behind 
Calmese over that distance two 
weeks ago at the Kansas Relays in 
12.3. 

Hancock won the 440 yard dash 
at the Big Eight Indoor in a Big 
Eight record time of 55.9 and ran a 
personal best 54.8 anchor quarter 
for the Cats 800 meter medley 
relay at Drake last weekend. 

SMITH, HANCOCK, Davidson 
and Osborn will make up the K- 
State 400 meter foursome, while 
McKee will replace Osborn for the 
800 meter medley combo which is 
hoping to better last week's 1:44.1 
school record time posted at the 
Drake Relays. 

Heading K -State's distance corps 



will be standout Renee Urish, the 
defending 1,500 meter champion, 

Urish, who set a Big Eight record 
4:24.6 for that distance last season, 
has finished fifth in the Texas 
Relays in 4:30.5, claimed the KU 
Relays title in 4:28.4, and ran a 
4:24.7 lourth place in the Drake 
Relays already this year. 

Joining Urish in the 1,500 will be 



another Wildcat standout, 
sophomore Cindy Worcester, who 
finished just behind her teammate 
in theKU Relays, also in 4:28.4. 

Leading the 'Cats field con- 
tingent will be Linda Long, the 
defending champion and record 
holder for the discus, Deb Perbeck 
in the javelin and high jumper 
Patty Bundy. 



Wildcats split against 
Emporia baseballers 



K-State pushed aside its 
sluggishness of the first game to 
blitz Emporia State in the second 
game of a doubleheader 11-1. The 
Hornets took the opener, 8-2. 

The split gave K-State three of 
the four games in the series which 
started Wednesday with the 
Wildcats winning 10-6 and 84. 

"We were flat the first game," 
said K-State coach Dave Baker of 
his team's only loss in the set. "I 
suppose that can be expected at 
this point of the season." 

However, the 'Cats were kicking 
in the second game as the first four 
batters scored for K-State. Two 
more runs were shoved across in 



the first as the "Cats rocked starter 
Mark Rhoden. 

Tim Pepper carried the big bat 
for K-State by going three-for- 
three and adding four rbi's. Pepper 
stroked a two-run single in the 
first, an rbi single in the second 
and a sacrifice fly in the fifth. 

RHODEN lasted one-third of an 
inning but gave up six runs (four of 
them earned) and four hits. 

Jeff Eubank relieved Rhoden but 
was not much better as he walked 
seven and allowed six hits in the 3.2 
innings he pitched. 

Andy Flint picked up the victory 
for K-State with relief assistance 
from Mark Harrison. 




ATTENTION: 

STUDENTS IN THE 
HEALTH SCIENCES 

lide Presentation Of 



The K.U. Burn Center 



Saturday, May 6 

at 10:30 Union 213 



Sponsored by Alpha Epsiton Delta 



The Islamic Association at K.S.U. 

invites the students and faculty 

for a big function on 

Saturday, May 6, 1978. 

It will be at the K.S.U. Union room 212. 

8 p.m. 

The speaker, Brother Mohamed Sorori 

from New York is going to speak 

about Muslim duties in this Century. 

Refreshments will be provided 

Sponsored by: 

Islamic Assoc of IXX. at K5.U. 




Styling by G Prbfessionals t 

MOD or CONSERVATIVE 
We're open 
Tuesday thru 

Saturday 
8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 






—Appointments preferred— 

WESTLOOP SHOPPING CENTER 

539-6001 




L 



Doradus presents 

music and dance 

of Spain 

May 5 at 7 p.m. in the Union Little Theatre 

no charge sponsored by MEC11A 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frt., May 5, 1S78 




RUGBY RASSLE. . .The 
game is called rugby and 
no holds are barred, te- 
state's men's and 
women's rugby teams 
will be fighting ft out 
tooth and toenail this 
weekend at the annual 
Sunflower Rugby 
Tournament at Tuttle 
Puddle. 

Photo by Bo Rader 



'...not crude, rude and unacceptable' 



ByKRISTILSON 
Staff Writer 

Rugby has gotten a lot of 
publicity lately, especially because 
it is an extremely physical, contact 
sport Those who don't like the 
game complain that it's too brutal 
or aggressive or dangerous. But 
those who play, play almost 
fanatically. 

What is it about this game that is 
drawing more and more fans to its 
pitch? 

K-State's women's rugby team 
plays for a variety of reasons. 

Mary McQay, freshman in 
learning disabilities, said she kept 
in shape through gymnastics in 
high school but there is no gym- 
nastics program at K -State 

"I was getting flabby," she said. 

Other women like rugby because 
it isn't a collegiate sport. 

"As far as sports at K -State, it's 
the only thing I could do that I have 
the time for," said Pam Grout, 
senior in journalism. "Tennis, you 
practice every single night. I just 
wouldn't have time to do that. With 
rugby it's more informal. You can 
come and go more than you can 
with some other sports." 

Jan Webster, senior in physical 
education, also likes the in- 
formality of rugby. She said 
because there is no coach this 
takes some of the pressure off the 
women. 

"It's a party sport. It's social and 
physical," she said. 

The major consensus of the team 
is that's it's this camaraderie that 
keeps them coming back. 

"I have met more people through 
rugby than any other one 
organization," McClay said. 

Grout said playing rugby's 
almost like having a union card. No 
matter where you go the tradition 
and the atmosphere is the same, 
she said. 

But almost all of the women were 
embarassed as rookies at their 
first rugby party because of the 
dirty songs everyone sings. 

"You just get used to it," said 
Janice Mueller, junior in 
recreation, 

But, "We don't sing dirty songs 
when the parents are there," Grout 
said. 

"My parents come out there and 
they support me and they support 
the club also," McClay said. 

In addition to the closeness the 
team feels for one another, rugby 



appeals to the women on a more 
personal level. 

"It's self-gratification," McClay 
said. "If you're not good enough for 
collegiate sports in a big university 
like this, what are you going to do. 
You don't want to just run for your 
own benefit. Running's a drag. 
This is fun." 

Because it is a new sport, 
Webster said that everybody is on 
equal terms. 

"They are all on the same level," 
she said. 

"And basically, everybody adds 
something. Nobody's a hero in 
rugby. It's a team sport," McClay 
said. 

"It fulfills a need to participate 
and compete," Webster said. 

"It gives me an outlet. It's 
aggressive and I love to travel," 
said Krista Hill, junior In physical 
education. "I think the number two 
reason (I play) would be the 
traveling, meeting new people and 
seeing new places. " 

Through the club she's been to 
Houston twice and to St. Louis, 
New Orleans, Denver, Austin, 
Emporia, Wichita and Kansas 
City. 

Although the K State women's 
team has a reputation in the Heart 
of America region for not playing 
dirty or taking cheap shots, in- 
juries do happen. 



"It's supposed to be rough and 
everything, but yet you just don't 
think of getting hurt during a 
game. After a while you get so 
involved in the game. You just 
want the ball and to do the best you 
can," said Maria Jones, junior in 
elementary and secondary 
physical education. 

"Usually when you're injured is 
when you're scared of getting 
injured and you do kinda dumb 
things," Grout said. 

The team thinks its the risks of 
the game that add to the fun. 

McClay said you get out of life 
what you put into it. 

"You have to take some risks to 
achieve something," she said. 

"You might have a car wreck 
and you could be paralyzed. Are 
you going to stop driving a car?" 
Jones said. 

Susie Lovewell, junior in 
physical education, said if you play 
aggressively, you usually don't get 
hurt. 

"We're not rude, crude and 
socially unacceptable. We're as 
fine a group of ladies as we are a 
rugby club, ' * she said. 

The ladies play this weekend in 
the Sunflower Tournament which 
K-State sponsors every year. Their 
first match is against Topeka at 
10:00 Saturday morning. They play 
Colorado University at 1:40 that 



afternoon. Sunday at 10:10 a.m. 
they play Emporia and they take 
on the Denver Blues at 1:00 p.m. 
The tournament, which also in- 
cludes 16 men's teams, is at Tuttle 
Puddle. Admission is free, except 
for the park's $1.00 per day parking 
permit. 



Front End 
Alignment 

SOUPENE'S 



114 S. 5th 



7764054 



GRADUATES! JOB'S AVAILABLE 
STARTING THIS SUMMER 



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Navy Officer! It's not just i Job, it's an adventure! 



HANKERIN' For HOMEMADE 

ICE CREAM? 

Sunday 2:00-5:00 p.m. 
Boy Scout Troop 76 

ICE CREAM SOCIAL 

6th and Poynti 
Lawn of St. Paul's Episcopal Church 

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM AND CAKE 75* 



OPEN MEETING of the Institutional 
Self-Study Committee For Handicapped 

MAY 9 10 a.m. -noon 
K -State Student Union 

Room 207 
Purpose: To review a draft of the committee'! recommendations 



MAKE IT COUNT 
ON GRADUATION DAY 



ELK-TRONIC CALCULATOR 



QS-2156 




fr 



Sharp Calculator Reg. $149.50 Now $129.95 
r\$ fists in/-\/-IH Sale Good thru May 13 

OlNCfc? UJOlIO 2OR N. 3rd Humboldt Square 776-6864 



KANSAS STATE COLLEQIAN, Fri, Msy S, 1»76 



She yells stroke, stroke, 
stroke, stroke, stroke... 



ByLAUKlKMILLEK 
Slaf f Writer 

II you happen to venture out to 
Tutlle this Saturday (or the Big 
Bight regatta, take a look at the 
varsity four boat. You'll probably 
notice some men with good 
physiques, broad shoulders and 
golden brown tans. But wait — 
who's that scrawny guy in the 
back? He's not even rowing! 

That guy, is actually a girl, Janet 
Lisson, a freshman in secondary 
math education, who is coxswain 
for the men's varsity four. She 
gives the commands and steers the 
boat. 

"I have two tiller cords in the 
back to help steer," Lisson said, 
"but they usually aren't too ef- 
fective. I usually just tell one side 
to pull harder than the other and 
that gets the job done. 

"In races it's the coxswain's 
duty to work out the strategy," 
Lisson said. "I tell them where the 
other boats are in relationship to 
our boat and I tell them how much 
further we have to go." 

LISSON BEGAN crew last fall 
when she heard they were short on 
coxswains. 

"A couple of guys in the dorm 

Crew to row 
in Big Eight 

The Big Eight Rowing Cham- 
pionships will be hosted by K-State 
at 9 a.m. Saturday at Tuttle Creek 
Reservoir at the Stockdale 
Recreation Area. 

Wildcat crews will take on 
Nebraska University, Oklahoma 
State University and the 
University of Kansas in'the last 
home regatta of the spring. 

Although Nebraska has won the 
Big Eight regatta every since it's 
biginning in 1975, men's coach Cliff 
Elliot said he thinks K-State will 
take the honors this year. 

"We've raced and beaten every 
school in the Big Eight this year," 
Elliot said. "Granted Nebraska 
will probably be our stiffest 
competition, but I think we'll beat 
them." 

Tennis men 
sweep match 

The Wildcat tennis men moved 
their record to 11-10 with a sweep of 
Missouri Southern Thursday at the 
Washburn Complex. 

Dave Krizman defeated Gerry 
Gobel, 7-5, 6-2. Greg Last defeated 
Lanny Wake, 6-0, 6-0. John Cope 
defeated Steve Deaton, 6-0, 6-1. 
Mark Westfall defeated Hal 
Middleton, 6-0, 6-1. Mark 
Reinhardt defeated Brad McLurg, 
6-0, 6-0. Marc Felts defeated Steve 
Yost, 6-1, 6-0. 

In doubles action Cope-Last 
defeaed Gobel-Deaton, 6-2, 6-1. 
Reinhardt-Felts defeated Wake- 
Yost, 6-0, 6-1. Steve Mohler and 
Mark Wetzel defeated Middleton- 
McLurg,6-0,6-l. 

The tennis squad takes on 
Cowley County Community College 
at 2:00 p.m. today and the 
University of Kansas at 1:00 p.m. 
Saturday. 



talked to me about going out for the 
team," Lisson said. "It sounded 
interesting so I went to a meeting 
and signed up. 

"At the beginning, a lot came out 
and the coaches let me stay. But as 
the season went on the numbers 
dwindled. By the end of two weeks, 
the majority had dropped out, 
either because of time conflicts or 
lack of motivation. That's good, I 
guess, because it left only the ones 
who were really serious about 
crew," she said. 

Last fall Lissson was coxswain 
for the women's novice eight and 
the women's novice varsity four, 
but this semester she is con- 
centrating on the men's varsity 
four. 

One important factor in choosing 
a coxswain is weight, which is why 
women are often chosen over men. 

"Girls are usually lighter than 
guys, plain and simple. What they 
are looking for is someone small 
with a big mouth," Lisson said. "I 
guess I fit the bill." 

CLIFF ELLIOT, the men's 

coach, said for the experience 
Lisson has had, she has developed 
into one of the better coxswain's on 
the team. 

"For being a novice coxswain, 
she has been able to race as well as 
any varsity coxswain we have," 
Elliot aid. 

Lisson said she doesn't feel any 
pressure from being a woman on a 
man's team. 

"I have a feeling of acceptance 
on the team," she said. "There's a 
reason for me being there. I was 
the one chosen for the position and 
I enjoy it." 

Big Brothers 
up to plate 

The softball team composed of 
Delta Delta Delta sorority and 
KMKF disc jockeys won a week's 
reprieve because of the rain last 
Sunday from its game with the 
Manhattan Big Brothers and Big 
Sisters. 

The annual charity softball game 
was postponed until this Sunday at 
1:30 p.m. at Jerry Wilson Field in 
City Park. 

Colored ping-pong balls will float 
through the air, dropped from an 
airplane. Gary Spani will coach the 
Big Brothers and Big Sisters with 
Willie Wildcat acting as general 
manager. 

Basketballer Rolando Blackman 
will coach the disc jockeys and Tri- 
Delts. 

Ja-Bo the Clown will vie for 
attention with the K-State 
cheerleaders as Manhattan mayor 
Bob Linder throws out the first 
pitch. 




Aztec 

Self Storage 
Now 
Renting 

Convenient— On K- 1 8 Near 

Manhattan Airport 

4 Sizes— 5x10, 10x10, 10x20. 

10x25 

New and Clean— Completion 

expected about May 15 
Safe — Secure — Accessible 

Call 776-1111 



Collegian 
Classifieds 

CLASSIFIED RATES 
On* day: 20 words or tots, $1 .SO, 5 
cents par word ovar 20; Two days: 
20 words or lass, $2.00, 8 cants par 
word over 20; Three days: 20 words 
or loss, $2,25, 10 cants per word 
over 20; Four days: 20 words or lass, 
$2.75, 13 cants par word over 20; 
Flva days: 20 words or lass, $3.00, 
1 S cants par word over 20, 

Classified! ere payabts in advance unless 
client he* an established account with Student 
Publication* 

Deadline Is 10 a.m. day belore publication. 10 
a.m. Friday lor Monday paper. 

Item* lound ON CAMPUS can be advertised 
FREE tor a period not exceeding three days. 
They can be placed at Kedil* 103 or by calling 
■MM. 

FOR SALE 



TANDV LEATHER tills, supplies, custom leather 
worv Special orders welcome. Black powder 
guns, accessories, supplies, equipment. Case 
knives frontier, western accessories Old 
Town Leather Shop Old Town Mall. (SOtf) 

COINS, STAMPS, military relics, antique*, guns, 
swords, paper, Americana, advertising 
memorabilia Buy, sell, trad*. Treaaure Chest, 
Old Town Mall (SOtf) 

BUY -SELL -Trade —records, lap**, coins, book*. 
comic a, Playboy*, other magazines. 
Costumes available to rent. Treasure Cheat, 
Aggleviiie. (SOtf) 

12x00 MOBILE home, fully carpeted, except for 
kitchen, central air and healing 013-494-2315, 
Walnut Grove Trailer Park (145-156) 

10x44 STAR mobile home Tvrobedroom, fur 
niahed, will consider contract. t220O or best 
reasonable offer. Call 5324731 before 5:00 
p.m. (146-150) 

BASF (PERFORMANCE), Scotch (Master) and 
Memo re ■ {Mr. OX2) cassettes for recording. 
S2.45 tor C 90, Call Dick, Room 214, 530-5301 
048-150) 

MARANTZ RECEIVER Model 2220B 20 watts, 
four year* left on warranty. BIC Formula 2 
speakers 1 5-75 watte. Six year* left on warran- 
ty. Call Randy, 539-821 1 , Room 525. (147 150) 

1971 HACIENDA mobile home Furnished In- 
clude* weaner, dryer and air conditioner. Ex- 
cellent condition. Reasonably priced. 
Available after final week. 537-8240. (147.151) 

197S HONDA CVCC automatic. 24,000 mile* 
Super clean, $2,800 or best oiler 537-0349. 
(147150) 

NORTH CAMPUS Courts mobile home. Really 
nice. Also 1971 Capri. 2000 cc, 4 speed Best 
offer. 77fM1 19 or 532-6600. (14B-1 55) 

(Contln ued on page 1 8) 



MM A I BRITH 

HILLEL 

Present* 



SUNDAY 
May 7, 197S 
3:30 p.m. 



Get 

Together 

Finale A 

Spring 

Picnic 



Picnic area before tubas 
at 

Tuttle Creak 



Make your reservations 
TODAY at 539-9292 




The automatic 

moped 

on sale at 

Mr. Moped 

312 S. 3rd 
1-5 M-F 9-6 Sat. 



THE LUNCHEON SPECIAL 

FROM 11 to 4 

SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 

•Individual-size single-ingredient pizza 
•Salad with your choice of dressing 
eSoft drink or Iced Tea 

ALL FOR ONLY '1.99 



Dine-in only 



All locations 



ft PIZZA PARLOR 



K 18 WEST AT STAGG HILL HOAD 
AND IN AGGIE VILLE 




WELCOME 

OUT-OF-TOWNERS 
TO THE ' 

HUCKSTER 
INVITATIONAL! 




Learn the Ropes 



Take a break from the academic grind and learn Mountaineering, one of 
three skills taught in the Army ROTC Summer Program (Course #249- 
252). 

No military obligation 

Four hours academic credit 

Special tuition provisions 



CHECK IT OUT! 



Call: Glade Presnal, 532-6754 
Or stop by Room 101, 

Military Science Bldg. 



II 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri., May S, 1»7« 



(Continued front pag* 17) 

NEW-WE haw . .ingle .lemen 
typewriter with four different pitches— em* 
pica, proportional and mlcroeM*. Hull 
Business Machine*, 1212 Moro, Aggtevtll*. 
(136tf) 

USED VW parts-been* and fast back, 
squerebeck part* up to 1971. Body and 

mechanical Call 1-494-2388. J4L Bug Service 
(133H) 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS programmable 
calculator*. All models In stock at low 
discount pf lc*i On* yew factory warranty, Tl- 
98159 solid Hat* software and TI-59 pakatie* 
In stock. Programming assistance available 

mn (13T-1S8) 

SUN HANG-gtlder-llke new will give laaaona. 
Call alter 9:00 p.m. 1-45*2926. (141-150) 

USED GIBSON Las Paul Custom. See at Stnnga 
h' Things. 814 N 12th, Agglevllle, 53*2009. 
(144-190) 



14'x60' SCMULT mobile horn*. 1972 Two 
bedroom*. Includ**: turn Hum, waahar, dryer, 
si Wing glass door, kite h*n bay window, storm 
windows, doubt* Insulation. Call 530-0306 at- 

t*r 6:00 p.m. 044-150) 

1972 CORVETTE. Qood condition, on* owner. 
14,900. Tutll* Creek Trsllar Ct. »38 537-9410. 
045-151) 

1977 KAWASAKI KZ400 5,300 mile*. LaManta 
faring, cuslom *mI, backrasl and luggage 
rack. Qraat hlway Iravallng. 11,400. Call 537 

7710.(149-153) 

12x66, TWO bedroom mobile noma, 1 Vi baths, 
air, appliances. Inexpensive lot rant. $3860. 
Call 77*6062 after 600 p m (1 49-150) 

STOP DRAFTS— save energy For as I* 
aluminum tracks for remounting double-hung 
window*. Several *Im* available. 94-S8 per 
8*1.539-1 546.(149-152) 

12*56, 1967 Ores! Lake* mobile home. Two 
badrooma, appliance*, air, anchored, skirted. 
Rocky Ford Trailer Park. Call 77*9052 after 
Bffl) p.m (14*150) 

9x43 MOBILE home, skirled, washer, shed on 
lot, good condition, call between 4:30—8:00 
p.m. 77*5478. (149-153) 

1971 BUDDY. 12x66 mobile borne, two 
badrooma, Includes appliance*, washer, dryer 
and ahag carpet. 15200 Call 77*3665. (149 
153) 

TURN YOUR stereo Into "Surround 
Sound"— Sansul 4-ehannel adapter with four 
VU-m*t«re, front/rear "control*, walnut 
cabinet. 175; two rear speakers. 122; TEAC 
Dolby noise reducer, S40— all from Korean PX; 
bra** fireplace screen, tool*, andiron*. 125; 
draftsman/commercial artist lighttabla. 922; 
call Tim 600 a.m— 5.-O0P m. 532-6415. (149- 
150) 

SAILBOAT- 1972 Hoble Cat, 14', In excellent 
condition. Trailer and all equipment Included. 
For more Information call: Dave 539-7654. 
(149-153) 

PRICE REDUCED ITSO-now only 12.750 1964 
10x53 mobile home with extension on living 
mom 5396521 95; 537-1 764 after 5. (149-151) 



10x56 MOBILE home, skirted, washer, dryer, 
shea Also tor ess*: sola bed, mattress and 
box spring*. 77*8934. (149,152} 

1 2x66 MOBILE home, two bedroom. For more In- 
formation call 537-4744. (149-192) 

1971 PINTO, automatic, ah conditioned. In- 
spected 537 2069 slier 5:00 p.m. 04*151) 

SKI BOOTS-KMtlnger Royal Spider, size BVs, 
ISO. Call 77*1904. (14*150) 

10x56 TWO bedroom mottle home, completely 
redecorated Located on large country lot. 
13.000. 494-2399. (1 4*152) 

12x60 NEW Moon, three bedroom, IVt bath*. 
air, skirted. Ideal tor students. 93800. 537-2107 
•fl*r 8:30 p.m. (14*192) 

1976 CHEW van, customized, 360 auto, power 
steering, power brake*, crul**, stereo, in- 
spected, 94996. 537-2107 stter 8:30 p.m. (14* 
192) 

RAT 1989 860 Spyder. Convertible. Need* some 
work. 5396917 or 77*3509 (14*150) 

1975 CELICA, AMfFM stereo, 29,000 miles, ex- 
cellent condition. Make oiler. Call 537-2897 af- 
ter 4:30(14*152) 

WEDDING DRESS, organza and lac* 1100. veil 
125 Both worn once. 937-4444. (14*199) 

WOMEN'S LO-SPCED Peugeot, 27" frame with 
all accessories, good condition. 77*1743. 
(14*191) 

1974 CHEVY 1f2 ton, power steering, power 
brakes, air, 360, automatic, tilt, mags, C.B., 
headers, toolbox, AM-FM 8-track, 93360 or 
make sn offer. Calf 77*3656. (14*151) 

1988 CHEVY Nova, 8 cylinder automatic, two 
door, 1425. Call 532-6203 weekdays 800 am. 
to 51» p.m. Evening*, cell 485-2570 Riley. 
04*153) 

TYPEWRITER, 1977, hardly used electric por- 
table, 9175, Call after 5:30 p.m. 77*5020. (14* 
ISO) 

1973 PINTO station wagon, electronic Ignition, 
all new carburetor, tires, exhaust, very good 
condition, reasonable. 1967 Dodge pick-up. 
S250 539-5056 1 1 49 153) 

12x69 VAN Dyke mobile home. 1989, with ap- 
pliance*, air conditioning. Skirted, with utility 
shed Qood condition, good location. 53* 
1236. (14*153) 

TEN-SPEED women'* bicycle, $99, call 9374)194 
after 5:00 p.m. (149-151) 



1985 FRONTIER 12x60 
bedroom*, Include* lumltur*, waahar, air con- 
ditioner, garbage disposal, appliances. 94000. 
call 77*3655. (14*153) 



OR RENT: 1974 2 bedroom 
Beautiful country setting. Large fenced yard. 
Big gerdern apace. Partially lumlahed. 
Washer/dryer. 532-6601, 77*41 19. (14*198) 

SMALL SANYO Refrigerator with wooden 
cabinet. 9100 or best offer. Phone: 932-9414. 
(14*151) 

1974 12x80 2 bedroom mobile horn*. A nice 
home 53*5621 *5. (149152) 



Crossword By Eugene Skeffer 



ACROSS 
1 Endure 
5 Kolinsky, 

for one 
8 Flabby 
12 Estimate 

too highly 

14 Layer of 
the eye 

15 Einstein, 
etal. 

If Aromatic 
herb 

17 Hill dweUer 

18 Walk like 
a child 

20 Biblical 

verb 
S3 Sewing 

machine 

inventor 

24 Compensates 

25 Household 
heads 

28 Turkish 
official 

29 Turned out 

31 Row 

32 Psychiatrists 
(slang) 

34 Kind of 
slipper 



35 Part of M.A. 

36 Pub game 

37 Louisiana 
county 

40 Penrods 
pal 

41 Main stem 

42 Evaluate 

47 Chaucer's 
"- of Bath" 

48 Thinker 

49 Winter 
vehicle 

59 Weight of 

India 
51 Insect eggs 

Avg, solution 



DOWN 

1 Ship's record 

2 Hail! 

3 Oriental coin 

4 Court 
procedures 

5 Swift 
• Indian 

7 Brings back 

8 Abrupt 

9 Roman poet 

10 Descended 

11 Narrative 
13 Undersized 

animal 
19 Was in debt 
time: 25 min. 




msffl hhs 



sat-i mkh oss 



: AC TORBHRUW S 



SSE EffiH 




Answer to yesterday's puzzle. 



20 Resort 

21 Ugly old 
women 

22 Nurse in 
India 

23 Listens 
25 Leopards 
20 Period of 

duty 
27 Condiment 

29 Evergreens 
31 Thing, 

inlaw 

33 Elevated 

34 Biblical 
false god 

30 Raised 
platform 

37 Caresses 
awkwardly 

38 Angle of 
leaf and 
axis 

39 Widespread 

40 Start for 
gaze or fish 

43 Perceive 

44 Tropical 
bird 

45 Asian 
holiday 

40 Bitter vetch 




1972 12x80 3 bedroom mobile home. N*w car- 
peting. 93*6821 *S. (1 4*152) 

FOR SALE: Large wood-enclosed car-top carrier 
and used window air conditioner. 53*9905 af- 
ter 9:30. (ISO) 

250 HUSQVARNA W.R., some accessories, line 
•nape, 9300. Call 93*4686, ask for Mlka 
Wilson. (150-152) 

KIMBLE WHITNEY spinel piano with bench In 
dark wood. 9490. Serious Inquiries only. 77* 
6105 slier 6:00 p.m. (160-1 54) 

1972 YAMAHA Enduro, low mileage, good con- 
dition. Call before 230 p.m 537-7280. (15* 
192) 



SIDEWALK SALE 

luoLle's 

in PROGRESS 



PIONEER CT 5151 and Suporscop* CD3Q2A 
cassette decks. Both are In good condition 
and have Dolby and Umller twitching. Call 
either jlm Kenworthy or Jack Kelt* at 53* 
4886. (19*192) 

1976 360 Yamaha, low mileage, excellent con- 
dition. Call after e 00. 494-2348. (16*1 94) 

197S KAWASAKI 290 street bike, three cylinder, 
two cycle, 5600 mller Excellent condition I 
9990. Call 93*7961 , aak for Ron Wilms. (150) 

27" MEN'S Nlehlkl lOepeed. Excellent con- 
dition. 77*1430.(15*151) 



NOTICES 

MANHATTAN PAWN Shop. 317 S. 4lfl Street, 
779-9112— atareo*. 8 tracks, TV's, 
typewriters, guitars, cameras. Buy-aell-lrade. 
(2tf) 

CUSTOM MADE MM. gold wedding bend*. Win- 
df Ire Jewelry, 230 N 3rd, Manhattan. (1 18tf) 

STEREO REPAIR— fast, reasonable competent 
repair of most brand*. Over 300 replacement 
needle* In stock. The Circuit Shop, through 
the Record Store. 77*1221. (12itf) 

ALVAREZ GUITARS otter* you a saving ol 
$66*8 on accessories and service* when you 
purchase one ol I heir fine acoustics. Your 
local dealer I* Siring* n Things, 614 N. 12th, 
Agglavlll*. 53*2009. (144-190) 

BOB SEQER, Foreigner, Head East, Uriah Heap, 
Bob Welch, Arrowhead Concert ticket* on 
•ale now at I he Record Store In Agglevllle. 
937-7959.(14*153) 

RONNIE MILSAP Concert ticket* at the Record 

Store In Agglevllle. 537-7596. (14*193) 

YOU MAY save a lot of money moving your- 
self—but you'll also get to pay tor anything 
that gats broken. Like any other type of in- 
surance, letting • professional mover lake 
car* of your move protects you against costly 
replacement or repair of valuable belongings. 
There are many other good reasons for letting 
Hart Transfer and Storage take care ol your 
next move— but then, you probably know all 
about getting the most for your money. Call 
77*8833 for a free estimate. From Hart of 
America to Anywhere In the World. (150) 



SUBLEASE 



LARGE THREE bedroom apartment o 
S225/month or O 175/month per room. All 
utilities paid, I urn I shed- two wsterbeds, 
screen porch 776-3386 (146-150) 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom, carpeted apartment. 
Central air, dishwasher. Close to campus, 
cable TV Included, negotiable, available May 
22. 537-8764. (146-150) 

LARGE ONE bedroom apartment, air con- 
ditioned, furnished with dishwasher Two to 
three people. 1010 Manhattan Ave Rent 9150, 
call 932-3297 (14*190) 

JUNE-JULY, two bedroom tour-person apart- 
ment 990 eech per month. Utilities paid, air 
conditioned, screened porch, close to cam- 
pus Call Mrs. Langham, 93*3934. (1 47-150) 

ONE BEDROOM— Leawood Apartments. 1637 
College Heights, furnished, air conditioned, 
half block from campus, June 1-July 31, 
couple or two single*. 1125/month plus elec- 
tricity Call David. 77*1364 or Dabbt*, 77* 
1590.(147-191) 

SUMMER- SUBLEASE luxury two bedroom 
apartment. For Information cell 77*7181.(1*7- 
190) 

SUMMER-LARGE on* bedroom apartment. 

furnished, ahag, air conditioned, very nice and 
spacious, close to campus— Agglevllle, must 
sublease, see and make oiler 77*1561 (14* 
191) 

SUMMER, THREE bedroom. 1 Vi bath, furnished. 
1978 mobile horn*. Cable, pool, tennis court*. 
May 20 through mid August. Good price. 937- 
8386.(14*192) 

SUMMER SPACIOUS one bedroom apartment 

91 10/month, available June I.Cell 778-1 752 af- 
ter 6:00 p.m. (t** 155) 

ONE BEDROOM, brick apartment Air con- 
ditioned with carport, two blocks from cam- 
pus Call 53*8772 or 77*1525. (14*151) 

PERFECT SUMMER apartment, two bedroom, 
furnished, modernized. Swimming, tennis half 
block away. Campus only three blocks. 1417 
Leavenworth, Gold Key apartment Excellent 
price. Rick, 537-8036.(14*152) 

WANT AN Inexpensive apartment tor summer? 
8125 will get you furnished apartment, close 
to campus, air conditioned, parking, balcony. 
Call 53*6983 (14*150) 

JUNE-JULY, 1 V) bedroom, air conditioned, fully 
furnished, three blocks from campus, very 
reasonable 532-3679 (14*192) 

SUMMER: WILDCAT apartment across from 
A beam. Nice, one bedroom, I urn is bed .central 
air, two balconies. Up lo three people. Early 
occupancy available SlSOVmonlh 537-9631. 
(14*150) 

RENT NEGOTIABLE for furnished two-bedroom 
duplex, two baths, dishwasher, air con 
dll loned, yard, parking. Close to campus. Call 
93*8983 or 53*4447. (14* 150) 

JUNE-JULY Mont Blue duplex Carpeted, cen- 
tral air, all conveniences Greatly reduced 
rates for summer, reasonable. 532-3844. (14* 
190) 

SUMMER— LUXURIOUS Iwo bedroom apart 
m*nl with central air. carpeting, dishwasher, 
and laundry facilities. One block horn 
Agglevllle. 77*4945. (14*193) 



FOR SUMMER: one bedroom apartment. Air 
conditioned, close lo campus Good lor two, 
9190 per month. Call Dave 537-9479. (14*190) 

SUMMER—SUBLET: luxury two bedroom apart- 

ment, furnished/unfurnished, air conditioned. 
dishwasher, balcony, laundry IsclllHes, reser- 
ved parking, rent negotiable. 9371568 
evenings. (14*152) 

LUXURY APARTMENT, sacrificed price, fur 
m*h*d, two bedroom duplex, washer and 
dryer In apartment, privet* parking for four, 
two block* from campus. 9220 monthly, Mont 
Blue apartment. Phone 77*7338, May paid. 
(14*152) 

LUXURY FURNISHED two bedroom, tor three. 
Must sacrifice by renting ridiculously low 
Last twelve days of May free. 53*7894. (14* 
ISO) 

FOR SUMMER: two bedroom Mont Blue span 
ment, furnished, air conditioning, laundry. 
free cable, pay electricity only. Rent 
negotiable. 537-4798. (14*152) 

MAY 22 August 20. Nice, roomy, furnished on* 
bedroom apartment. Air conditioned, tola ol 
windows, close to campus. 1100 monthly and 
electricity. Desperate. Becky. 53*2019. (14* 
153) 

SPACIOUS. FOUR bedroom house, two baths, 
two car garage, big yard, nice area, 2301 An- 
derson. Musi sublease. Call 77*0478. (14* 
192) 

MAY 20, acrou from Aheam, air conditioned, 
laundry, two balconies, one bedroom, 1-3 
people. Wildcat Jr., $ 1 30. 937-962* (14*1 92) 

MUST SUBLEASE: beautiful, secluded two 
bedroom apartment, large wooden doors open 
onto veranda, 9125 Call Tim 77*3291. (14* 
190) 

LUNDIN APARTMENT, furnished, two bedroom, 
on* block from campus, June-July. 77*3775. 
(14*192) 

EXTRA NfCEl Two bedroom apartment off Kim 
ball, east of CrCO park. Available now. Call 
537-0820. Rent negotiable. (14*193) 

FURNISHED MONT Blue Duplex, two targe 
bedroom*, two baths, washer and dryer, cen- 
tral Mr, carpeting, plenty of room for tour. 
Close to campus. Available May 22- Aug 1. 
Call u* first at 937-4089. (14*193) 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom. Glen wood Apartment , 
furnished with air conditioning and dish- 
washer Across from Aheern. Call 937-0*89. 
(14*192) 

RENT NEGOTIABLE; specious two bedroom fur- 
nlahed apartment, air conditioning, carpet 
and cable TV. One block west of Aheam. Call 
77*347*04*193) 

SUMMER: FURNISHED, luxurious, large 
bedroom comfortable for three, 1/2 block from 
campus, negotiable price. Coach lamp, 1229 
Clallln. Patty 93*4811 '341, (14*153) 

HOUSE— FOUR bedroom furnished, two baths, 
air conditioning, laundry facilities. Easy ac- 
cess to campus, enclosed backyard. Cheap! 
Call Jay or Jeff 53*6423: Tom (103) or Chuck 
001)53*8211. (14*133) 

CUTE: TWO bedroom, fully furnished apart- 
ment. Central sir, shag carpeting, dishwasher. 
Cloee to campus and Agglevllle. Good for 
three. Rent negotiable. 77*3049. (14*153) 

SUMMER: TWO bedroom furnished house with 
air and parking. Gas, water. I rash, cable paid. 
920 Bert rand, 77*3162 alter 5:00 p.m. (14* 
150) 

MUST RENT this spacious one/two bedroom 
apartment Carpeting and furniture. Con- 
venient location. Rent negotiable from SI 25. 
Call 77*3468.(14*153) 



Low as $120 a Month 

Wildcat Inn Apts. 

For 

June and July 

Summer School 

Furnished- 
Air Conditioning 

WE HAVE 
LIMITED AVAILABILITY 

For More Information 
Call 



CELESTE 
539-5001 



SUMMER: TWO bedroom, furnished, nice 
basemen i apartment. Close to campus. 
tlOOrmonth plus electricity Call 77*4399 af- 
ter 5:00 p.m. (H» 151 > 

SUMMER— ONE bedroom apartment across 
from campus— two or three people. Air con 
ditionmg, dishwasher, balcony. Call 77*4329 
alter 5:00 pm (149153) 

SUMMER-VERY nice house, furnished two- 
bedroom, 114 bath, lull basement, air con- 
ditioning, carpet, garage and nice yard, two 
blocks sasl of campus, will accommodate up 
lo four, rent negotiable, call 53*6657 (15* 
155) 

SUMMER: COZY, furnished one-bedroom apart- 
ment with air conditioning, laundry facilities, 
next to the park. Rent negotiable. Call 77* 
3187.(150) 

HEY: PERFECT apartment lor summer, hall 
block from campus, carpel, air conditioning, 
nlcs furniture, oil-street parking. Negotiable. 
5323787 (15*195) 

SUMMER MONT Blue two bedroom, furnished 
apart menl. Close to campus. Air conditioning. 
Reduced rates, call John, 132 Marian Hall, 
5395301 (150-1531 

CLOSE TO campus: For summer, three bedroom 
brick house fully furnished, air, rec. room, 
washer and dryer, dishwasher, fenced 
backyard. 9225/monlh. Call: 77*1491. (15* 
194) 

TWO FURNISHED second floor apartments for 
summer Two blocks from campus and 
Agglevllle Kitchens, carpel and air con- 
ditioning, STSeech. Cat! 537*76*. (15*154) 

PRIVATE. FURNISH EO two bedroom apartment. 

Excellent location adjacent lo campus. Frac- 
tion of utilities Low price. Cell 7760768 (150- 
154) 



TWO BEDROOM apartment. Furnished, air con 
dllioned, carpel, dlahwasher, appliance*. One 
block from Agglevllle, five from campus. 
Large rooms, toads of closet space. Rent 
negotiable. 77*0535.(14*150) 



For June & July 

subleasing 2 bedroom 

apartment. Mont 

Blue Complex 

Laundry facilities, 

balcony, air conditioning 

close to campus. 

Cut Rate $150 per mo. 

Call 532-3147 or 532-3148 



SUMMER: TWO bedroom air conditioned apart- 
ment. Two block* from campus and 
Agglevllle. Rent negotlabl*. Call 77*1807. 

(15*154) 

SUMMER: CAMPUS east. Large two bedroom 
luxury apartment. Fully carpeted, air con- 
ditioned, iv> baths, patio. Rent negotiable. 
Call 537-9015.(15*154) 



SERVICES 

RESUMES TYPESET, designed and printed by 

professionals get results 100 impr*t*tons- 
817. The Offset Press prints anything. 77* 
"9 317 Houston (23tl) 



RESUMES WRITTEN from scratch by 
professional writer*. Your resume I* written. 
designed, typeset, printed. 100 cople*/S29. 
537-7888.(13*199) 



SOUPENE'S 
COMPUTER 
ALIGNMENT 

114 South 5 th 



776-8054 



VW BUGS up to 1975— tune-up, valve ad- 
justment, and oil change only 926 at J 61 Bug 
Service. (Add 94 extra tor air conditioning.) 
Free ride back home. Drive • little, sav* a lot. 
1 -494-2388, St. George. (1 5*1 55) 



ATTENTION 



KATER'S 0RIVING School taking applications 
now. For information call K*y Inc., Manhattan, 
KS, 537-8330. (10*159) 

PIANO INSTRUCTION 

Now is the time to schedule piano 
lessons with Kurt Werner. Mr. 
Werner is a graduate of KSU and 
the Manhattan School of Music 
NYC. He has studied with 
Margaret Walker, Charles Strat- 
um, Robert Goldsand and Jeanne 
Dowis. Phone 537-4924. 



PORTRAITS FOR Mothers Day and Graduation. 
Reasonable riles, fast service. Open 
evenings Kaiser Commercial Photography, 
Dwlght, KS 913-482-3334 (15*194) 



LOST 

I HAVE purchased the Bullard Lathes located on 
the west side of Seaton Court*. To ths person 
who can produce the hydraulic motor which 
was taken from one of these lathe* during the 
week of April 16, I would gladly buy you one 
that you can use In exchange for this special 
motor or will offer a reward for its return. Con- 
tact Key Machine Tool, P.O. Box 254. 
Wamego, KS 66547. (14*150) 

SMOKE COLORED eyeglasses In black case: 
vicinity of Farrell Library. Reward. Call Scot! 
5377127 or 53*9701. (14*152) 



PERSONAL 

WARNING: THE Tequll* Kid (Silas the Unclear 
Engineer) he* recovered. Last seen jlt- 
terbuggtng •• Gilly's with a sexy brunette. 
Where is h* and who was *he? The Animals. 
(19*191) 

LITTLE BLUE RkJInghood— Happy 21*1. May the 
year ahead of you be fantastic. We'll try our 
beet. Your Future Roomies (190) 

TO THE ATO Little Sisters of AXO, Thanks for 
the sunrise break last. It was a real surprise lo 
have a girl wake us In our beds and not be 
asking to take her home. Your fun-loving dads 
(ISO) 

TO THE country girl driving a boat, take It for a 
fast Sunday spin, but In all lb* rush, don't 
fuss. Have* wild and happy 21al. (150) 

SHELLI: HAPPY 21*1. I'm looking forward lo a 
wIM and crazy party tonight! Love, Betty. (150) 

TO THE Grand Order If the beet gets bur- 
ned— H's "pits" tar the pelvis Not the 
auxllliary, but the axlllaryl (PS This la only a 
threat). (150) 

CHICKEN DOCTOR— A part ol me will always 
love you bul lime grows short and this Is 
farewell. For all that can never be said bet 
ween us— Good luck. God bless, and lake 
care. Honey. (150) 

IT'S OBVIOUS. Why? Just because. And (he 
summer won't be any problem. Besides. II 
doesn't mean forever And It's different (150) 

PA BUBS: Happy 21St Birthday! Will you Still go 
out with me even though you can buy your 
own liquor now? Say ye*. Love you. Ma Bubs. 
(ISO) 

TO THE great guys of the lots Nu Phi chapter of 
Kappe Kappa Kappa: Thanks tor the wild & 
crazy lime last night You're a great bunch of 
guys end we love you and your "Blzz Buzz." 
We'll miss you this summer. The women from 
the lota Nu Delta chapter of Seta lots Tsu 
Alpha. (150) 

CV THE bug helped me make II through the lestl 
Thanks so much for the flowers thai 
brightened my week. (1 50) 

SASHA TREIBERNIECHI. Good luck with your 

recital Break * reed, kid we love you. OT Bee. 
Chiller. J.D. Klutz (150) 

(Cont)nu*d on page 19) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fit, May 5, 1978 



19 



(Continued from page IS) 

SS: WE know what your birthday wish Is— hop* 
It coma* trust Happy Disco Inlerno and 8ir 
thdayloo!tTS.aE.e.(150) 

JOE: HAPPY Birthday! I lovs you, Lavs. Cindy 
(1501 

\.- DEAR KAROL. The nicest, sweetest, motl won 
dertul, patient fllri in ths world Thank* tor 
slicking it out with me when my csr became 
lealous Push (1501 

CONGRATULATIONS RAVENS on winning the 
Division Thanks to Lit a. Trudy. Eva, Ann, 
Chris, MaManna. 01 ens, A. Men a. Nln, Karen. 
Dave. Rick, Allen, Dave, Latham, Allen. 6-0 
was greet but 1*0 Is better. Lei's do il (ISO) 

BEWARE FAIR maidens, the Fiji Islander is 
upon us Can you survive the Fiji love potion 
on top ol a mighty Fl,l lip lock 7 (iSOl 

^^ FOUND 

IN WEBER Hall: black fold-up umbrelie. Claim In 
Weber 117. (148-150) 

SET OP keys trom UPC spring -break trip Call 
532-6570 (149-151) 



BABV QERBILS, 
(14*150) 



FREE 

call 776-4280 slier 5*0 p.m. 



PARAGE SALE 

PORCH SALE -Kappa Kappa Gamma 517 Pair- 
child Tan., Saturday. May 8. 8*0 a.m-5:00 
pm (150) 



WANTED 



TO BUY: Playboys, Pleygirts. Penlhou**, Owl, 
Gettery and others Comics, paperbacks, 
coins, stamps, mllltarta, antiques. Treasure 
Chest. Agglevtlle-Old Town Mall. (12*155) 

RIDE NEEDED lo Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Will 
■hare driving and gas; leaving final week. Call 
John, 53*6823 (1 46-150) 

TO BUY; old, Cheap, photo en larger Call 776- 
1221 (147-151) 

GOING TO San Francisco area* Would Ilka to 
•end two tables, two heat square Will share 
gas Local resident 537-0471 (148-152) 

TO BUY— New or used violin In good condition. 
Call or sea Dave, Room 221 , Goodnow. 532- 
8223.(149-151) 

A RESPONSIBLE parson to live In our house 
July 8-Auguat I In exchange (or tending cats 
and house. Reference* required 53*1548. 
(148-152) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

SUMMER/FALL, female* lo share large fur 
niahed house, private bedrooms, more J60 
and up. Most bills paid. 1005 Vettler and 1122 
Vattier 53*8401.(121-190) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share Wildcat Inn apar- 
tment for summer Call Pam, 778*400. (14* 
150) 

PERSON WANTED to Share twobedroom 
mobile home, private bedroom, washer and 
dryer. Fell and spring. Rent 91 00 and half utili- 
ties Marvin 537-7*41. (147-151) 

MALE ROOMMATE needed tor this summer to 
•hare luxury apartment Approximately ft 00 
with utilities 537-8125 (147-150) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to snare luxury 
two bedroom apartment lor summer. For In- 
formation call 778-7101 after 5:00 p.m. (147 
151) 

MALE/FEMALE vegetarians preferred, but con 
sider all mallow and liberal persona. Close to 
campus, park Summer/tall after 4:00 p.m. Tad, 
537-2395. (147-151) 

MALE ROOMMATE to share nice, fully fur- 
nished two bedroom apartment tor aummer. 
Carpeted, central air, dishwasher. Call 537- 
8229.(14*150) 

LIBERAL FEMALE roommate wanted Im- 
mediately lo share mobile home. Private 
bedroom. Washer/dryer 165 monthly plus 
electricity . 5374298 alter 5:30. (14*153) 

ONE OR two roommates lo share apartment for 

fall and spring Located away from campus. 
For details call 77*0493. (14*155) 

FOR SUMMER. 170 a month and hall electricity. 
Good location, 530 N 14th, between 
Aggiavllle park, and campus. Call Chris 
Biggs. 537*305, 53*8827 after 5:30. (14*153) 



FALL. TWO females needed lo share two 
bedroom, two bath, furnished duplex with two 
others. MOYmonlh include* utilities. Close to 
campus Call 77*7339 (15*154) 

LIBERAL ROOMMATE wanted. Close lo cam- 
pus, Aggtevllla, and park. Utilities 
paid - tlOOrmonlh 77*7191 (15*153) 

NEED A roommate for tha aummer— 990 In- 
cludes utilities, own bedroom, close to cam 
pus and Aggteviile Contact Mike at 537-2817. 
(15*1541 

FEMALE TO share with thraa girt* 1st floor ol 
house. One block from campus, five blocks 
from Aggtevllla 980, utilities paid except 
phone. Air conditioned, turn It had. I Ire place, 
front and back yard Ruth, 53*5677 after 9:00 
p.m. (15*151) 

SUMMER ONE or two females to share two 
bedroom apartment. Furnished, carpeted, air 
conditioned and close lo campus 185 to 185 
per month Call 537-8174. (15*151) 

WELCOME 

MASSES AT Catholic Student Center. 711 
Denlson, 9:00 a.m., 1000 a.m., 11:15 am., 
12:15 and 5:00 p.m. Sundays, 4:30 p.m. week 
days, 5*0 p.m. Saturdays. (150) 

FIRST LUTHERAN, 10th and Poynti; University 
students are Invited to attend s Blbte Study 
Group thel meet* In ths basement ol the main 
building of the Church at 9:40 a.m. on Sun- 
day*; Worship Service at 8:30 a.m. and 11 00 
a.m. Our Church Bus slops at Goodnow Hall 
at 10:35 a.m. and at Boyd and West Halls at 
10:40 am for rides to service* Milton J. 
Oi»on. Pastor. (150) 

COLLEGE HEIGHTS Baptist Church, 2221 
College H eight* Read: Worship: 9 45 a.m. and 
7m p.m.; Blbte Study: 1 1 00 a.m Phone 53* 
3598. Bill Foil. Pastor. (150) 

First 

Presbyterian 

Church 

8th & Leavenworth 

Celebration of Worship 

At9:00& 11:00a.m. 

"ANewName" 

"Life After Death" 

University Class Discussion 

9 : 50 a.m. in Ass't Pastor's Study 

A yellow bus will call at 10:35 by Good- 
now, and between West and Boyd at 
10:40 Tor the 11:00 a.m. service, 
because the blue bus will be on 
vacation. 

GRACE BAPTIST Church, 2901 Dtckena, 
welcome* you to Worship Service* at 830 and 
1 1*0 a.m. University Class meals si 9:45 am.; 
Evening Service. 7:00 p.m. Horace Brelatord, 
Ken Edlger 53*5020. (150) 

WORSHIP ON campus al All-Filth* Chapel, 
. 10:45 a.m. Evening service. 6 30 p.m. 1225 Bar 
i rand, the University Christian Church, 
Douglas D. Smith, minister. We're un- 
denominational! (ISO) 

COME JOIN US! 

Worship and Study 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
2121 Blue Hills Road 

Christian Education 

Classes 9: 45 a.m. 

Worship Service 

11:00a.m. 

Free transportation- 
Call 537-7979 or 
Bell Taxi 537-2080 

LUTHERAN— UMHE Campus Ministry Invites 
you lo our 1 1 00 a.m. student worship at Dan- 
tort n Chapel (on campus) east ot the Union. 
Ecumenical, international, student par- 
tic I pal Ion, a caring community. Phone 53* 
4451.(150! 

CHURCH OF the Naiarene. 1000 Fremont, Sun- 
day School, (000 am.; Morning Worship, 
11*0 a.m.; Evening Service. 6:30 p.m ; Prayer 
Service. Wednesday, 7*0 p.m. (150) 



ST. PAUL'S Episcopal Church, 8th and Poyntt, 
welcomes you to Sunday services at 8:00 and 
11*0 a.m.; weekdays si 5:30 pm. Tran- 
tportallon available. 77*9427 and 77*6364 

(150) 

MANHATTAN WESLEYAN Church, Poynlz and 
Manhattan, Worship 6:30 and 10:55 a.m 
Sunday School . . 9:45 a.m A vital, biblical 
fellowship (150) 

WELCOME STUDENTS! First Chris nan Church, 
115 H. 5th College class. 9 45 am, Worship. 
1 1:00 a.m Ministers: Ben Duerleldt, 539-96*5; 
BUI McCutchen, 77*9747 For trantporatlon, 
csll 7 76-6 790 bafors 9 00 a m Sunday* (150) 



You are invited to join us 
at the 

FIRST UNITED 

METHODIST CHURCH 

Sixth &Poyntz 

9:45 a.m. "The Open Door" 

Dialogue and Study 

Temple building east 

of the church 

1 1 : 00 a , m . Di vine Worship 

Rides Available 
Call 776-8821 



PEACE LUTHERAN Church Invitee you to our 
8:15 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday service* Go 
on* halt mile west ol new stadium on Kimball. 
We era friendly (150) 

MISS THE small church atmoephare? Coma 
worship with u* Keats United Memodlsi 
Church, 6 miles weal ot KSU on Anderson 
Church, 9*0 a.m.; Sunday School. 10*0 a.m. 
(150) 

HELP WANTED 



WAITRESSES OR waiters and bartender* 
53*9753 after 12*0 noon, (1 43- 1501 



Call 



SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: require hard working 
student* . involves bookkeeping, marketing, 
and Inventory. No experience necessary, 
willing to relocate 537-9014, after 5:00 p.m. 
(144-153) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT -and May through 
September— truck/combine, drivers needed 
for custom harvesting. Contact Sieve 
Schneider. 913-43*7225, Lincoln. KS 67455. 

(145-155) 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT— Swimming and 
springboard diving Instructors are needed tor 
I he KSU Community Physical Activities 
Program. All applicants must have s current 
WS1 certificate and be enrolled full-time this 
spring or summer Call 533-6242 afternoons. 
(147-151) 

VISTA DRIVE In has openings for help In foun- 
tain or grill. Start part-time now and work full 
or part-time this summer Apply In person. 
(14*152) 

TWO HOURS per day to aaaltt with housework, 
live day* per week. SI 30 monthly. Must have 
own transportation Female* preferred. 53* 
2747.(14*155) 

COMPANY HAS a lew position a for K-Stata 
student*. Last year tha average K-Stal* 
etudenl earned 13.500. For Interview csll 77* 
3*42.(14*153) 

I NEED undergraduate students for an ex- 
periment on learning. Participant* wilt be paid 
S3 .00 for 1 Vi hours. Pre-test will be given at 
Denlson Hall 216, May 4th and 5th from 
6:30-9:30 p.m (149-150) 

PART-TIME summer work with children and 
youth for a church in Manhattan. Write Box 
338, Manhattan, KS 66502 (14*153) 

ASSISTANT MANAGER for wholesale elec- 
tronic branch store Responsibilities Include 
counter sale*, *tocklng and Inventory control, 
and some management duties Must be self 
motivated, and have some type of electronic 
background. Good handwriting and sales ex- 
perience helpful. Contact Mr. Pfrano, Acme 
Radio Supply, Box 401. Manhattan, KS 66502 
77*8712.(15*153) 



LPN'S-RN'S 

3 :00p.m.-ll :00 p.m. 

ll:00-7:00a.m. 

shifts 

Full and Fart-time 

Positions Available 

Generous Salaries 

Apply in person 

College Hill Skilled 
Nursing Center 

2423 Kimball 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

HOUSEBOYS. FALL 197S, for Interview call 539- 
3424 (14*151, 



FOR RENT 



TY PE WR I T E R P, E NT AL S . Stect r Ic * and manual* ; 
day, weak or month Buuells. 511 Leaven 
worth, aeroas from post otllce. Call 77*9469 
(1lf) 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS; excellent selection 
Hull Business Machine*. 1212 Moro, 53*7931 . 
Service most makes of typewriters. AI*o Vic- 
tor and On veil i adders, (ill) 

ONE, TWO, three bedroom furnished, un- 
furnished apartment* for summer If all 10 or 12 
month contracts No pel* 537-8389. (i 19tl) 

LARGE, NICE, furnished apartment Thraa 
mala*. Private. Parking. Reasonable. Knotty 
pine walls. Large bedroom, single bad* For 
tall. 77*6897.(14*151) 

LARGE APARTMENT available May 22. 1143 
Two bedroom*, full beeemenl, central air, 
refrigerator, stove, carpeting Prairie Glen 
Cooperative Townhou*es. 7769675 (14*190) 

FOR JUNE and July, near campus, furnished, air 
conditioned, two bedroom, IttKVmonth. plus 
part ultimas. Furnished, large, three bedroom, 
1200. bill* paid. Furnished, large four 
bedroom, $240, bills paid. 53*4904. (147-155) 

UNFURNISHED NEWLY decorated, fully Car- 
peted, two-bedroom, baseman I apart mem 
Walk to school. Rang* and refrigerator fur- 
nished. Heat, water and trash paid Room tor 
two No pets. I2t0 monthly. 53*6133 or 53* 
3086, evenings. (147-150) 

UNFURNISHED, TWO BEDROOM duplex with 
basement Walking distance to campus 
Range and re Inge rat or furnished. Heat, water, 
end trash paid. Room for three. No pets 1270. 
53*6133 or 53*3085. evening*. (1 47-150) 

SUNSET 
APARTMENTS 

1024 Sunset 

1978-79 School year 

one bedroom furnished 

year lease from $150.00 

2 blocks from campus 

539-5051 (i.9p.m.) 

FOR SUMMER — tail, furnished, air conditioned, 
paneled, one and two bedroom apartments. 
Reasonable term*. 53*4904. (1 47-1 55) 

SUMMER: ROOMY on* bedroom apartment 950 
a month plus electricity Call Alan 53*8211. 
Room 61 7, leave mestage. (14* 1 50) 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1, luxury two bedroom fur- 
nished apartment. All appliances, fireplace, 
carpel, air, near campus, ample parking. Call 
77*3467, 537-4567. (14*152) 

Furnished/ Unfurnished 
Apartments 

•At KSU 

• One to four bedrooms 

• Most bills paid 

Phone 539-8401 

THREE BEDROOM house, furnished, with 
weaharfdryer. Close to campus, on* year 
lea**, available June 1 si. 7766670. (148-152) 

UNFURN1SHEO APARTMENT at 814 Wildcat 
Rkfga: living room, dining room, bedroom, kit- 
chen, bath. Pay electricity only. tlBOpermon- 
Ih. Available June 1 . Call 7767677 (home) 532 
6716 l»»K for Professor Mathema). (148-150) 



PEANUTS 



by Charles Shultz 



PO HOU REALIZE THAT 
UJE ARE NOW SIXT^- 
THREE RUNS BEHIND? 


< ^^/ r ^^ Ct*\\} 


($kj/y\ )"\ ' 


i^'lffl 


:rf^R-\ -I «e^W>i -— - 



THAT'5 ALL RIGHT! 
LUE CAN COME BACK! 
LET'S 5H0UI SOME SPIRIT 1 





DOWNSTOWN 



by Tim Downs 




CJHfDOTt)UTflUc: 
DOUNTD nflE? 
■£m RN INTEL- 
L16EMT INDIVID- 
UAL. rX>fTT0U 
THINK GIRLS 
HAVE BRAINS^ 





YbUTHlNK JUST 
BECAUSE Trfl ft 
UOrtVNKl YOU HA\/E 

TDTAtKTo me 

LIKE X DAS A 
-TUOYBAR-OLD. 






MAIN FLOOR apartment al 527 Pierre Street 
living room, bedroom, kitchen, bath, front and 
back porches. Pay electricity only. $190 per 
month. Available June 1 Call 7767877 (home) 
932*716 (ask for Professor Mathema) (14* 
150) 

THREE BEDROOM house, half acre fenced, 
west Manhattan Available first of June. Prefer 
famllla*. After 6*0 p.m. 293-5313. (146155) 



PARKVIEW 

Student Housing 

Osage and llth St. 

Near Campus 

Near Aggie ville 

• furnished 

• free parking 

• equipped kitchen 

• laundromat 

• $55 and up 

Reserve now for 
summer and fall 
Phone 537-4233 

ONE BEDROOM furnished apartment with 
garage. Available August iSth f 185 monthly, 
plus utilities. 410 S. 15th 3:00 to 6*9 p.m. 
(14*150) 

AUGUST 1ST, three story unfumlehad house. 
Thraa bath*, 13 rooms Next lo campu*. 1400 
plu* utilities. Contract and deposit 537-8389 
(14*158) 



SUMMER RENTALS 

ROYAL TOWERS 
i\PTS. 

Two Bedrooms 
$135.00 a month 

Air Conditioning 

All Utilities Paid 

including Cable TV 

Contract June 1 —July 31 

$150,00 Deposit 

Call 539-8851 or 5304510 

5:00 p.m.— 7:00 p.m. 



LUXURY DUPLEX, furnished, one year old, thraa 
large bedroom*, fully carpeted, walk to cam- 
pus, modem kitchen. 9325. 537-1724. (14*160) 

JUNE-JULY: IVi bedroom, tumUhed. balcony. 
air conditioned, disposal, water paid, three 
blocks to Aggiavllle and campus Reasonable. 
9175 plu* electricity. 77*1593. (14*151) 



NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

4APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 
from $165 

• FREE shuttle service 

.to KSU 

* portion of utilities paid 

* adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

Phone 

539-2951 

or see at 

1413 Cambridge Place 



VILLA II Apartmenta, one block trom campus, 
one bedroom, carpeted, furnished, central air. 
92O0 amonth.no lease, no pet*. Cal 1 537-4567 
(15*155) 

HOUSE FOR summer In N on h view area, com 
pletaiy furnished, two bedrooms, central air, 
ga/age. Baldwin piano. Call 5374474. (15* 
152) 



GOLD KEY 

APARTMENTS 



New deluxe 2 Bedroom— Modern 
Furniture— Garbage Disposal- 
Dishwasher— Shag Carpeted with 
Drapes. Close to City Park, Tennis 
Courts, Campus and Aggieville (3 
blocks). 

$245— $275— $300 
for students 

1417—1419 Leavenworth 

Leasing for Fall and one im- 
mediately. 



APARTMENTS. TWO bedroom basement ad 
jacent campus. S160. Two bedroom, walk to 
campu*. main floor, 9240 Lease, deposit, 53* 
3672 evening* (15*153) 

ONE, TWO, three and lour bedroom fumltbed 
apartments lor rent near campus for summer 
and fall Call 537-0428 (15*155) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, FrL, May S, 1878 




Now comes Miller time. 




3 197 7 hM*r Slewing Co . Milwaukee. Ws 






SAS SI Alt tUSSl 
TOPiKA, KS 6fcfcX2 



SUUA8 IK 
EXCH 



IAC nominees to Senate, again 



By DOUGLASS DANIEL 
SGA Editor 

A special meeting of Student Senate will 
be held Wednesday night to approve 
student members of the Intercollegiate 
Athletic Council (IAC) after senate 
rejected approval of three recommended 
representatives during Thursday's senate 
meeting. 

Senate voted not to approve the 
students after some senators and students 
said they were not representative of 
women's athletics at K -State 

Also criticized was the absence of a 
voting female representative in the 
recommendations. The three voting 
members nominated, Bill Oswald, Craig 
McVey, and Ted Knopp, had served 



previously on IAC and were criticized as 
not being sympathetic to women's 
athletics. 

Although Thursday's meeting was the 
last scheduled session of senate for the 
semester, senate must meet to approve 
the nominations for IAC student 
representatives. 

Student Body President Sam Brown- 
back, who recommends the represen- 
tatives, said interviews for the positions 
will be held Tuesday and Wednesday. 

An informal hearing for students to 
discuss the selection process for the 
representatives will take place Tuesday 
in the Student Governing Association 
(SGA) offices in the Union, Brownback 
said. 



Brownback said that while he 
recognizes there wasn't a voting female 
recommended to the council, the 
nominated students are qualified to sit on 
IAC. 

Brownback said other recom- 
mendations for student members of 
council and committees were made with 
qualifications taking priority to gender. 

"We couldn't justify in our own minds 
swinging and making a different criteria 
just for this committee," he said 

Pressure by some students to recom- 
mend a female voting member may cause 
Brownback to reconsider recommending 
a female for a seat on the board above a 
male who may be more qualified, he said. 

Of the 22 students who applied for the 



council openings, three were women. One 
of the women, Gwendolyn Macon, was 
recommended as a non- voting member to 
the council 

A committee consisting of a member of 
Brownback' s cabinet, a member of 
Student Senate Personnel Selections 
Committee and a former member of IAC, 
Allison Luthi, will interview and 
recommend the student members, 
Brownback said. 

Brownback said another special session 
of senate will be necessary if senate 
doesn't approve the recommended IAC 
member during Wednesday's meeting. 

"I think if we present a group that is 
palatable to senate we shouldn't have any 
problem in the second round," he said. 




Pholo by Sus Plannmutlrr 



Did you say... 

Glenn Ruppert, graduate student in Art, holds up a 
painting while John OShea, Instructor in print 
making, gives it a critical look. The two men were 
helping out in Sunday's art auction at West Stadium. 



Monday 



May 8, 1978 

Kansas State University, 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol, 84 No. 151 



Kansas State 

Collegian 

Acker and Graham declare 
readiness to change IAC 



By DICK WAGNER 
Collegian Reporter 

K-State President Duane Acker 
has appointed a seven-member 
committee to "review the present 
structure of the Intercollegiate 
Athletic Council and to suggest 
alternatives that would enhance 
the functions of the IAC. " 

Acker's announcemment came 
in the wake of some concerns 
expressed by IAC chairman John 
Graham for the structure and the 
duties of the IAC and its members. 

The committee will be chaired 
by Don Rathbone, dean of the 
college of engineering. Also sitting 
on the board are Craig McVey, 
senior in health, physical 
education and recreation; Jean 
Sharp, senior in engineering 
technology; Meriine Snyder of the 
K-State Alumni Athletic Board; 
Craig Helwig, a representative of 
the K-State Athletic Foundation, 
Inc.; Charles Litz, associate 



professor of administration and 
foundation; and Elizabeth linger, 
assistant professor in computer 
science. 

GRAHAM, ASSOCIATE dean of 
the college of business, said last 
week he had major concerns over 
the IAC and that he would resign as 
chairman unless changes were 
made. 

"There are several problem 
areas with the current structure 
and organization of the IAC," 
Graham said. "The most basic is 
the plain and simple fact that the 
President (Acker) is ultimately 
responsible in the area of athletics, 
yet he has no authortiy over the 
appointment of the members of the 
council. 

"From the management point of 
view, this is the simple case of 
authority not being commensurate 
with responsibility." 

Currently, although the IAC is a 



presidential committee, the 
faculty and student senate have the 
authority to select its members on 
the IAC. Acker is also concerned 
with this method of selection. 

"It is very important that the 
selection process insure that the 
people involved are dedicated to 
having a strong and respected 
athletic program with a high level 
of integrity," Acker said. 

GRAHAM AND Acker also agree 
that the size of the IAC is a han- 
dicap. 

"It's been an awkward struc- 
ture," Acker said. "The size is 
awkward. It is too large." 

"My second area of concern is 
that the council is too large to 
function effectively as a decision 
making group," Graham said. "A 
large group can provide input, but 
commercial research has proven 
that large groups cannot make 
(See CHAIRMAN; page 10) 



Carter, Congressional opponents 
may compromise jet sales plan 



WASHINGTON (AP)-President 
Carter and his opponents in 
Congress may be ready to com- 
promise this week on his proposal 
to sell jet fighters to Israel, Egypt 
and Saudi Arabia. 

An administration source, who 
asked not to be identified, said 
Carter is willing to compromise, 
and Sen. Jacob Javits (R-N.Y.) 
says he thinks congressional op- 
ponents a re also. 

"My guess is that when the 
proposal comes (from Carter) 
there will be acceptance," Javits 
said. 

THE TERMS of a possible 
compromise are unclear. The 
administration source said Carter 
is willing only to add a com- 
mitment to give Israel more planes 
in the future. 

Javits said Carter's aides have 
not made that or any other offer to 
him and did not say what he and 
other opponents would be willing to 
accept such a proposal. 

Most of the congressional op- 
position is to Carter's plan to sell 60 
sophisticated F 15 jets to Saudi 
Arabia that Israel fears may be 
used against it. 



Israel would get 90 jet fighter- 
s— 15 F-15s and 75 F- 16s— and 
Egypt would get 50 less 
sophisticated F-5s. 

Congress has 30 days, until May 
28, to veto all or part of the sale, 
and administration officials who 
presented their case for the planes 
in Senate testimony last week go 
before House members this week . 

ELSEWHERE in Congress, 
Senate-House conferees may try 
again this week to approve an 
energy bill compromise and the 
House is to act on a $3.7 billion 
foreign aid bill. 

Conference leaders have agreed 
to a compromise on natural gas 
pricing that they hope will help get 



Carter's energy package through 
Congress. 

But two other compromise at- 
tempts have fallen apart when put 
to the conferees, and the leaders 
want to be sure not to put this one 
to a vote until they know it will be 
approved. 

The $3.7 billion foreign aid bill is 
for U.S. economic development 
assistance. The House may act on 
a $2.9 billion military aid bill later 
in the month. 

The House also hopes to com- 
plete action Tuesday on a 
resolution that would set $500.5 
billion as Congress* target for 
federal spending for the fiscal year 
starting Oct. 1. 



Inside 



GOOD MORNING) Partly cloudy, but a bit warmer with highs In 
the mid to upper 60s. Details, page 3... 

AMID CLOWNS, dancers and artists, the University for Man 
celebrated its 10th birthday Saturday, page 9... 

WATCH OUT for those get-rlch-qulck schemes advertised In 
magazines, you may pay more than you get in return, page 13... 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon..M»y8,1»7» 



Fishermen, feds clash over 
international whale quotas 



ON THE ARCTIC OCEAN ICE 
(AP)— Come home! The crews 
huddled on the ice several miles 
from shore heard the plea 
throughout the afternoon on the 
local public radio station. 

The message was sent by the 
senior whaling captains of Barrow, 
the nation's northernmost village. 
Both the Alaska Eskimo Whaling 
Commission and the Barrow 
Whalers Association urged the 
crews to avoid a confrontation with 
federal agents, who had accused 
Barrow crews of taking too many 
bowhead whales. 

The issue was the first quota on 
the 2,000-year-old subsistence hunt. 
The quota was set by the Inter- 
national Whaling Commission, 
which feared the bowhead was 
nearing extinction. No commercial 
hunting of the bowhead has been 
allowed for more than 35 years. 

In the broadcast message, 
chairman Jacob Adams of the 
Eskimo commission told the 



whalers to cooperate in hopes the 
U.S. government would support 
Eskimo efforts to have the quota 
lifted. 

SHORTLY AFTER the broad- 
cast, several of the more than 20 
crews passed by, towing home 
their umiaks, 30-foot-long wood 
frame ships covered with seal skin. 
The boats hold a crew of up to six 
men. 

By the time the sun finally 
dipped into the placid water early 
Sunday only one crew remained on 
the ice. 

Billy Neakok and his crew vowed 
to hunt until they got a whale, 
despite threats of federal 
prosecution and of ostracism by 
their own people. 

They had moved their camp, 
camouflaged with chunks of ice, to 
within a few feet of the remains of 
the controversial fourth whale 
taken by the villagers. Under the 
quota, Barrow was entitled to three 
whales. 



Summit chips away at 
German Iron Curtain 



HAMBURG, West Germany 
(AP)— Soviet President Leonid 
Brezhnev wrapped up a four-day 
summit Sunday with West German 
Chancellor Helmut Schmidt, who 
said the talks broke new ground in 
East-West relations. 

"The new thing is the complete 
openness of the talks on almost 
everything in the world. ..That is 
the real political result of the 
talks," Schmidt told a news con- 
ference here minutes after 
Brezhnev's blue-and-white 
Ilyushin jetliner left for Moscow. 

Schmidt said President Carter 
planned to telephone him later for 
a briefing on the summit. 

Royal Purples 
finally available 
at Kedzie Hall 

Distribution for K-State's Royal 
Purple yearbook will be today 
from l to 4: 3Q p.m. and continue 
through the week, at Kedzie Hall. 

Yearbooks will be distributed 
from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday 
through Thursday after which they 
may be picked up in the Student 
Publications Off ice, Kedzie 103. 

"Each student must have this 
semester's fee card in order to pick 
up a book," said Rita Shelley, 
Royal Purple Editor. 

Students are required to show 
their fee card, fill out a slip of 
paper and can then get their book 
from the truck parked on the west 
side of Kedzie Hall, Shelley said. 

Rader runner-up 
in photo contest 

George "Bo" Rader, a staff 
photographer for the Collegian, 
has won runner-up honors in the 
32nd annual Intercollegiate 
Photography Competition, it was 
announced Thursday. 

Rader, a sophomore in jour- 
nalism and mass communications, 
will receive a summer internship 
with National Geographic 
magazine for placing second. The 
contest was sponsored by Kappa 
Alpha Mu, the National Press 
Photographers Association, the 
University of Missouri School of 
Journalism and National 
Geographic. 

Rader, who lives in Manhattan, 
competed with collegiate 
photographers nationwide. His 
portfolio was second only to David 
Grifin of the University of Ohio. 



The 71-year-old Brezhnev, 
bundled in a black hat and over- 
coat against a chilling wind, was 
given a full military sendoff at 
Hamburg airport. Back in 
Moscow, Brezhnev was met at 
Vnuvko diplomatic airport by 
Premier Alexei Kosygin and other 
top Soviet officials at a welcoming 
ceremony broadcast live on Soviet 
television. 

BREZHNEV and Schmidt held 
three days of talks in the West 
German capital of Bonn before 
flying to this northern port for a 
final round Sunday. They 
discussed a wide range of issues 
including arms control, weapons 
development, the neutron bomb, 
divided Berlin, the Mideast and 
Africa. 

The government-controlled 
Soviet press warmly applauded the 
Brezhnev trip as another victory 
for his policy of detente. Soviet 
national television devoted 
unusually heavy coverage to the 
visit, apparently to underline its 
policy significance as well as to 
enhance Brezhnev's image as an 
international statesman. 

The two leaders signed a 25-year 
economic cooperation agreement 
designed to at least double trade 
during the next five years and 
promote German industrial 
development of Soviet natural 
resources. 

A Soviet-West German 
statement issued Sat'irday night 
renounced efforts by any country 
to strive for military superiority. 



MEEfYOUl 
IDS AT. 

1 + 1 

Buy any beverage 
at regular price . , 
GET 1 FREE! 



TOMtni 

mm— io-.h) 



Mil Zahn, chief of enforcement 
for the National Marine Fisheries 
Serviee, said quota violations 
would be prosecuted, but he said 
agents weren't likely to go out on 
the ice and force a confrontation. 
He noted it was the first quota, and 
that Barrow has taken more than 
20 whales in some years. He said, 
"We want to be reasonable." 

"I was impressed by Jacob 
Adams* message < to stop hunting) 
... they're setting the tone for the 
future," Zahn said. 

THERE WERE some anxious 
moments, however, after the 
senior captains made their appeal 
because another Eskimo 
leader— not a commission mem- 
ber—went on the radio to urge the 
crews to continue. He contended 
only two of the four whales taken 
were bowheads, and thus the 
village was entitled to one more. 
But Adams prevailed. 

Some whalers had contended two 
of the whales were right whales, 
and thus not subject to the 
bowhead quota. The issue ap- 
parently arose partly because the 
Eskimo language has two words 
for bowheads, depending on their 
size and shape. Zahn, however, 
said bowheads are a type of right 
whale. 

Federal biologists also said 
bowheads were the only type of 
right whale in the area, and their 
examinations of the four whales 
indicated all were bowheads. 

Adams, wearing a whale button 
from the anti-whale hunting 
Greenpeace Foundation, added, 
"We want to cooperate, We're 
hoping that if we do, the federal 
government will try to get the IWC 
to lift the quota . " Adams and other 
Eskimo commission members had 
decided to ask the crews to come 
back after several meetings with 
federal agents. 

THE FOURTH whale had been 
taken Wednesday evening, and a 
few hours later a fifth whale was 
struck and lost. But despite 
government orders to stop, the 
crews had continued hunting until 
the commission broadcast its 
appeal Friday. 

The voices of several senior 
whalers were taped for the 
broadcast; one spoke from his sick 
bed. 

Eskimos had fought the quota, 
saying the whale— which provides 
a ton of meat per foot— was crucial 
to their diet, and the whale hunt 
was an irreplaceable part of their 
culture. 




OTHER SPECIALS 
NOT INCLUDED 

• Cneopor Divwin 
Ailsinoontl 



^MoMe^ 



9 



°f 



Special 

Gifts For 
Special 
Moms 







Sifned and dated, rcutona I Firvt Annual 
Edition Mother •. Day B»lt Imruiei an 
eleiJMlv trolled cameo ol Mother and 
Child 1 



I osruybeU J 

Downtown Aggieville 



HI 



tree Puhlk Leclurt 

^^ B> * "Imn-hrr tif Ihrr 
t Irvrvsi-endrrlljil 

Mrriiuiiiin lYirgram 



«.n.,,.K, n ji-i, ii*i 
h oundrr of the TM program 



The Transcendent* I Meditation 
Program as taught by M a ha r is hi 
Mahesh Yogi is a simple, natural 
scientifically verified technique 
which develops clarity of mind 
and provides deep rest to mind 
and body resulting in more 
energetic, enjoyable activity. 

Monday. May 8. 8 p.m. in 
Room 207 Union 



Introductory Lecture 

Thursday, May 11, 8 p.m. in Room 204-Umon 

Preparatory Lecture 

rnnisiM fc iMlnil«m<Mlilnlioii 

A iiiie mrmr program f* thr full drv Fhipmrnl uf the individual 



Bread of the month 
Whole Wheat 




Order in Food Service Office 

24 hours in advance 



Inquire about rolls, cakes, cookies, pies! 



m 



k-state union 

food service 



0101 



WOODY'S ANNUAL SPRING SALE 
ONE WEEK ONLY!!! 



s&i 9U 



am nam 



tfaJe fi*4em 



S(U $U#W $*** $&*& *** *s* <$**f /»«* 



t0% <$<m Jt 9Li ^LU S/Lm jLa Mm*. 

tManu %P*m ffhch am mm on JaM 

S&t JL*. SfamA ¥ !fi»m Jmvnk axe 5.00 ff 

Jieautam- tTvice 

Jmmmer. Jla& 5.00 eacA 

.Jbrn. ¥ 'Women i t^wwi tTVCaa fam znb 4y 
0Li/JL 5£w*en mm am onfy 0.00 a fuii*. 



i^'i 



Mastercharge \^j( 

Visa 

Woody 6 Charge 



liioo'otj's 



r-O-'ITCSij 



open daily 

9.30-5:30 
open until 8:30 
thursday. 



KANSAS STATE COLLCQIAN, Mon„May8.1»7< 



Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 
the explosion "**" -*-" 1 ** <!«»■«**-«« qa> ir*twu:h* 

rocket. The 1 
Beirut, Lebar. 
or injured in r 
government 

It was the 
guerrillas ha v 
holy city. L 
been tradtia 
Israeli police 
possible attal 

Fearing v* 
soldiers co * 
Jerusalem ft 
heaviest wee 



Mond* 

CANBERR 
Mondale an 
focus on the 
Australia am 
this vast nat 

Mondale 's 
capital city f| 
Eastern tout. 
Philippines at 

The vice prl 
of two mor: 
refugees at A 
Forty -one bop 
landed on the 
takeover in \ 

ClAt 

washing; 

Sunday that] 
telligence ag 
tervention in 
Union. 

John Stock 
he commanc 
agency head 
allegations ii 
program "60 

Stockwell 
amounted to 
but withheld 
the congress, 
covert CIA 

Stockwell 
South Af: 
Union to 



Mora bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME ( AP )— Aldo Moro bid bis 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 

f»»,il„»n Friday That time thfriiav 



( Campus Bulletin ] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATIONS FOR SGA Student Affair* 

committee chairman and IAC members arc 
available In the SGS Olfk«, ground floor of the 

Union, and are due May* at S p m 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS applications are 
being fa ken In Justin 107 through May II. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for fall 
1971 are available in the Panhellenlc office. 
Hold HOB. Deadline for registration It July 
IS. 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN 

TER will meet at City Park at Si 30 p.m. for 
dinner 

NEW SPURS will meet at the international 
Center at a p.m. 

TUESDAY 
NORML will meet at Brother'*. Tavern at 
7:30 p. m 

MCCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 

will meet at McCain Auditorium at 7 p m to 
plan tor fall attractions 

' hute CLUB will meet 

at 8 p.m. for elections, 

■y. 



'DENTS win meet at 



■RaV §. flt Konsai State UnivwBty # Htay 5, 1978 

Dimensions 

Supplement to the Seyuca State qoUecjtafi 





will 

L announce* me final 
11 Ino. in Anderson III m 



THE THETA XI will 
rseat? 30 p m 

ITER will be In the 
* at 1 p.m. Show Is 
lion is tree 

PRESENTS L. A Bash 
•gin el I p.m. in Seaton 
i. Final meeting lor the 



ISDAY 

will meet in Union 



tdFal 

FS 

turns 

being 
ted. 

izie 103 
10 p.m. 
May 10 




S draft 



Plan II 



LOS ANGI 

have helped 

black and w 

dication the \ 

men in that tvpvvi., uv-wimng w/ owuics ictcucu 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



»OOOOOOa 



know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Moo., May «, 1978 



i — Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 



the explosion 
rocket. The 1 
Beirut, Lebar, 
or injured in ? 
government 

It was the 
guerrillas ha 
holy city. L 
been tradtia 
Israeli policoj 
possible attsl 

Fearing nr 
soldiers co * 
Jerusalem ft 
heaviest wet 



Mondi 

CANBERR 

Mondale an 
focus on the 
Australia aw 
this vast nat 

Mondale 's 
capital city t\ 
Eastern tout 
Philippines 

The vice 
of two mor 



-t _r miwt—lm, Ciiiflt.mil fU tVotTJ tlgha 



More bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME (AP)— Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 



[ Campus Bulletin ) 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATIONS FOR SOA Student Attain 
committee chairman and I AC member* are 
available in the SGS office, ground floor ol the 
Union, and are due May 9 al J P m 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS applications are 
being taken in Justin 107 through May II. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for fall 
1978 are available In the Panne lien I c office, 
Holtl HOB. Deadline tor registration I* July 
25. 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN- 
TER will meet at City Park al 5 30 p.m. for 
dinner 

NEW SPURS will meet at the international 
Center at 4 p.m. 

TUESDAY 
NORML will meet at Brother's Tavern at 
7:30 p.m. 

MCCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 
will meet at McCain Auditorium at 7 p.m. to 
plan for fall attraction* 

HUTC CLUB will meet 
lata p.m. for elections. 

dents will meet at 



will meet in Union 



id fiffi >M I «w jm 

fflS «> tWm -rij-mtf out:. 

and tHdiitj w& I -tttefl. Ikxti. 
<oo on mm I <p, 

v$ eccDticfe ticK tta tittle, out. 

tflUCrl left TO "KHdW 

-roacf to find" out. 
-4ft SteKOMd 



IB I 

i 



refugees at /! 
Forty -one bo* 
landed on the 
takeover in \ 



ClAt 

WASHING 

Sunday that 
telligence ag 
tervention in 
Union. 

John Stock 
he commam 
agency head 
allegations i 
program "6( 

Stockwetl 
amounted to 
but withheld 
the congres 
covert CIA i 

Stockwell 
South 
Union 



Afrig 
to el 




L announces the final 
tllno in Anderson 121m 

THE THETA XI will 
M* at 1, 30 p.m. 

ITER will be in the 
e at I p.m. Show is 
lton is free 

■RESENTS L.A.BaSh 
rgln at I p.m. In Seaton 
. Final meeting for the 



ISDAY 

win meet in union 



ran 

id Mi 

9 

tions 

being 

ted. 

lzie 103 
10 p.m. 
May 10 




, 



■KS 



£ draft 



Plan lit 



LOS ANG 

have helped 

black and « 

dication the , 

men in that r*,^*,!., uwuiume w owuica icrcaocu 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




KANSAS STATE OOLLEOIAN. Won, May I, H78 



Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 
the explosion f 
rocket. The I 
Beirut, Leban 
or injured in * 
government 

It was the 
guerrillas ha 
holy city. Ii 
been tradtiOL 
Israeli police! 
possible attal 

Fearing irf 
soldiers co 
Jerusalem f< * 
heaviest wtt 



Mora bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME ( AP»-Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 



Campus Bulletin 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATIONS FOR IOA Student Affair* 
committee chairman and IAC members are 
available In the SGS oHke, around floor of the 
Union, and are due May f at 5 p.m. 

COORDINATED ONOEROR ADU ATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS applications are 
being taken In Justin 107 mrouah May 11. 

SORORITY HUSH APPLICATIONS for tall 
i»7l are available In the Panh.llenic office. 
Hold HOB Deadline for registration it July 
IS. 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEM 
TER will meet at City Park at 5:30 p.m. for 
dinner 

NEW SPURS will meet at the International 
Center af 4 p.m. 

TUESDAY 

NO* ML will meet at Brother's Tavern at 
7:30 p.m. 

MCCAIN AUDITORIUM STUOENT BOARD 
will meet at McCain Auditorium at 7 p.m. to 
plan tor fall attractions. 



■ 



UYE CLUE will meet 
> p.m. for elections. 



Getaway for... 



...a minute 



Transcendental Meditation 4 



DENTS will meet at 
fill meet in union 



L announces the final 
.(lino in Anderson mm 



THE THETA XI Will 
teetVJOp.m. 

ITER Will he In the 
,| at 1 p.m. Show Is 
Jon is free. 

•RESENTS L.A.6esh 
igin at I p.m. in Sea ton 
. Final meeting for the 



JSOAY 

will meet in union 



Mondi 

CANBERR 

Mondale ait 
focus on the' 
Australia ant 
this vast nat 

Mondale's - 
capital city t| 
Eastern toui 
Philippines a] 

The vice pf I 
of two morj 
refugees at /J 
Forty-one bo* 
landed on the 
takeover in \ 

CM A 

WASHING 

Sunday that 
telligence ag 
tervention in 
Union. 

John Stock 
he command 
agency head 
allegations ii 
program "60 

Stockwell 
amounted to : 
but withheld 
the congress., 
covert CIA 

Stockwell 
South Afri 
Union to 



Plan Hi 



...an hour Long Distance 5 



...a day 



Big Brother 6 



...a weekend TUttle! O 



...3 WB6K 



...a summer 



Thumbin' 11 
Outward Bound 12 





m 



EDITOR — Pete Souza 

$T AFF — Castle Ufz, Dale Kelllson and Jamie 
Hoverder 

PHOTOGRAPHY — Cralfl Chandler, Sue 
Pfannm uller, Bo Radar, Rick Seltz and Pate 
Soma 

CALLIGRAPHY — Sal He Hofmelster and Mary 
Parmar 

ARTWORK — Sal I la Hofmelster, Cindy Logan 
and Jim Gugg 



COLLEGIAN EDITOR — Chris Williams 



fTkiy 5, N78 





Supplement to the Kansas State Collegian 

DIMENSIONS Is a monthly magazine sup- 
plement to the Kansas State Collegian, Kansas 
State University. Offices are In the north wing of 
Kedzle Hall, phone 532-4555. 

DIMENSIONS Is a pro|ect of Robert Bon 
trager's Magazine Production class. Student 
Publications, Inc., and the Department of 
Journalism sponsor the magazine. 



-ES 



i draft 



30000000 



LOS ANG1 

have helped 

black and w 

dication the \ 

men in that repect, according to studies released 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




KANSAS STATE COUEQIAN, Mon. May «, 1978 



Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 
the explosion <■ ' ■ -—»*■■»■ u-a* 
rocket. The 1 
Beirut, Leban 
or injured in r 
government 

it was the ...a minute 

guerrillas ha 
holy city. L. 
been tradtior. 
Israeli police! 
possible attsi 
Fearing m 
soldiers co 
Jerusalem ft 
heaviest wei 



More bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME ( AP)— Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 
r^_j_ bmj ""■-* — n--j-.. 



[ Campus Bulletin ) 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATION! FOR fOA Student Affairs 
committee chairman and IAC member* are 
available In the SGS office, ground floor of the 
Union, and are due May* at 5pm 

COORDINATED UNOERGR ADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS applications are 
being taken In Justin 107 through May 1]. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for fall 
1971 are available In the Panhellenfc office, 
Holti HOB Deadline for registration It July 
». 



TM: Moments 
for a Better Life 



Mondi 

CANBERR 

Mondale arr 
focus on the 
Australia am 
this vast nat 

Mondale 's 
capital city tl 
Eastern toui 
Philippines a 

The vice prl 
of two morj 
refugees at A 
Forty -one bo* 
landed on the 
takeover in \ 



ClAb 

WASHING 

Sunday that 
telligence ag 
tervention in 
Union. 

John Stock 
he command 
agency head 
allegations ii 
program "60 

Stockwell 
amounted to 
but withheld 
the congressi) 
covert CIA ' 

Stockwell. 
South Af: 
Union to 



Plan lift 




by Lynn Bastian 

Meditate (med'e tat) 1. to reflect 
upon; contemplate. 2. To intend 3. To 
engage in contemplation. 

Once a seldom used word in America, 
more and more Americans are turning 
to Transcendental Meditation to escape 
the pressures created in today's 

Over 1.5 million people in the United 
States now practice TM with more 
experiencing it daily. 

Mark and Carolyn Mears, Manhattan 
residents, are among many who teach 
the technique of TM. 

"When we talk about what the 
Transcendental Meditation program is, 
we always start out by talking a little 
bit about what it is not," Mears said. 

"They want to know, is it a religion; 
is it a philosophy; and it's important 
that we bring out from the beginning 
that it's not. It in no way involves any 
kind of religion or religious practice," 
he said. 

According to Mears, members of all 
religions practice TM, including clergy. 

Clergy who practice TM technique 
report that it is not a religion and it in 
no way conflicts with their religion. 

"More importantly, it seems to 
uphold and improve the integrity of a 
person's religion whether it be 
Christianity, Judaism or whatever," 
Mears said. 

"The church has always had 
meditation," Daniel Scheetz, chaplain 
of the Saint Isadore's University parish 
said. 

"It is a very Christian and biblical 
practice. Many of the methods em- 
ployed in Transcendental Meditation 
are in accord with the Bible and 
Christian tradition." 

"I do not find Transcendental 
Meditation an alternative to Christian 
faith; I practice it within the context of 
my Christian life," Karl Lutze. 
theology professor at Valparaiso 
University said. 



LOS ANGI 

have helped 

black and w 4 

dication the ) 

men in that repect, according to studies releasee 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



"Nor does my calling upon the 
exercise of TM imply that my Christian 
faith or religion is inadequate," he said. 

Another misconception is that the TM 
technique involves a large amount of 
concentration according to Mears. 

"It in no way involves any kind of 
contemplation or concentration." This 
is a very unique aspect of the technique. 

"It doesn't involve any manipulation 
or control of either the mind or the 
body," he said. 

"A person is completely aware of 
happenings around him while 
meditating." 

When the misconceptions are cleared 
up, you can deal with what the TM 
technique really is. 

"It can be defined most simply as a 
simple, natural, scientifically 
verifiable technique that 

systematically and spontaneously 
brings about a state of enlightenment in 
a human being," Mears said. 

"By a state of enlightenment, we 
don't mean anything miraculous," he 
said. "We are talking about someone 
simply utilizing their full potential of 
mind and body." 

The Transcendental Meditation 
technique is practiced for 20 minutes 
twice a day ; once in the morning before 
the activity of the day and again in the 
late afternoon before the activity of the 
evening. 

"When people think about TM they 
often think about something that is 
going to lead to 'quietism' or with- 
drawal, but TM is just the opposite of 
this. Its primary aim is to be a 
technique of action and to prepare a 
person for more dynamic, enjoyable 
day-to-day activity," Mears said. 

Whatever kind of activity a person 
does can be improved if he is using 
more of his potential. 

"It is important that when a person 
starts practicing TM he does not 
*■ (continued on p. 14) 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN 
TER will meet at City Park at s 30 p.m. tor 
dinner. 

NEW SPURS will meet at the international 
Center at a p.m. 

TUESDAY 
NOR ML will meet at Brother'* Tavern at 
7:10 p.m. 

McCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 
will meet a! McCain Auditorium at 1 p.m. to 
plan lor tall attractions 

"lUTE CLUB will meet 

at I p.m. for election*. 

r- 

jplNTS will meet at 
Hill meet In Union 



L announces the final 
limy in Anderson 131m 



THE THETA XI will 
Half 30 p.m. 

TER will be in the 
t at 1 p.m. Snow I* 

■jn 11 free. 

RESENTS L.A.Baih 

■In at ■ p.m. In Seaton 

Final meeting, for the 



tDAY 

an meat in Union 




know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 



KANSAS STATE COUEOIAN, Mon. May 1, 1I7S 



i — Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 
the explosion { " — — 



More bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME ( AP)-Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 



[ Campus Bulletin ) 



ANHOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATIONS FOR ISA Student Affairs 
committee chairman and IAC member* ere 
available in ttie SGS office, ground floor of the 
Union, and are due May * at 5 p.m. 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS applications are 
being taken In Justin 107 through May 12. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS tor fall 

1978 are available In the Panhellenlc office, 
HutM 1106. Deadline for registration la July 
IS, 



rocket. The 1 
Beirut, Leban 
or injured in r 
government 

It was the 
guerrillas ha 
holy city. Ii 
been tradtic 
Israeli polk 
possible attaj 

Fearing xr\ 
soldiers co 
Jerusalem : 
heaviest w< 



Mondi 

CANRERR 

Mondale an 
focus on the 
Australia am 
this vast nat 

Mondale's 
capital city it 
Eastern tomi 
Philippines a] 

The vice pf I 
of two morj 
refugees at A 
Forty -one bos 
landed on the 
takeover in \ 



CIA b 

WASHING 

Sunday that 
telligence ag 
tervention in 
Union. 

John Stock 
he command 
agency head 
allegations ii 
program "60 

Stockwell 
amounted to i 
but withheld) 
the congress.) 
covert CIA 

Stockwell 
South Afi 
Union to 



Plan Htt 



...an hour 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN 
TER wilt meet at City Park at 5-30 p.m. lor 

dinner 

NEW SPURS will meet at the international 
Center at * p.m. 

TUESDAY 
NORML will meet at Brother's Tavern at 
7: JO p.m. 

MCCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 

will meet at McCain Auditorium at 7 p.m. to 
plan tor fall attractions. 



1UTE CLUB will meet 
at • p.m. for elections. 
f. 

PINTS will meet at 
oil) meet in Union 




•LONG DISTANCE 

'It's just like being there' 



by Jamie Hoverder 

"I quit! " Judy screamed out in her four- walled cubicle, 
also referred to as her dorm room. The biology and English 
composition books tumbled to the floor as she slammed her 
chair against the Formica desk. 

Judy turned on her radio, listened to the jabber of the D.J. 
and plopped down on her bed. Then— she felt it. The panic of 
what is termed the "Dial one— then the area code— attack". 

Thoughts of her high school sweetheart clammered around 
in her head. 

"How nice it would be to talk to him on the phone." 

She shook her head wildly trying to ignore the thought. Her 
dialing finger was itching. 

In the past, Judy had tried numerous tactics to ignore her 
itchy dialing finger. Once she wrapped the phone in a towel so 
she wouldn't have to look at it. Another time she burned her 
telephone number list. Usually she went down to the dorm 
basement to watch TV, only to be saturated with telephone 
commercials that reminded her that "Long distance is just 
like being there. " No di verson seemed to work for Judy. She 
was at a loss. 

Judy had paid "Ma Bell" large amounts of money due to 
her dialing disease. Sometimes she would have nightmares 
about wicked operators laughing as they plugged her into 
long distance. She could see them sneering and saying, * Oh 
boy, another sucker ! ' ' 

Calling long distance was so satisfying to Judy. She always 
seemed to escape to those places she'd rather be. When the 
books and the dorm giggles got to be too much, she'd lock her 
door, dive for the phone, dial away to her little heart's con- 
tent and actually escape. The commercials didn't lie— it was 
just like being there. 

There were undesirable side effects to Judy 's dia ling 
disease, however. After she had sacrificed her beer and 
Sunday supper money for one phone bill, she didn't have 
much for the next bill. Since Judy's hot little hand was ad- 
dicted to the phone, she couldn't quit. Even after she had just 
paid a $60 bill. So, the next consequence was being ap- 
prehended by "Ma Bell's Threat Squad." 

The "Threat Squad" always seemed to call between 7: 30 
and 8:00 in the morning. At least it seemed that early. The 
representative from the "Threat Squad" would torture Judy 
by putting her on the "Bad Credit List. " But the worst threat 
of all was turning off her phone. Judy shuddered at the 
thought of that. 

Poor Judy. She was the laughing stock of her floor in the 
dorm. They knew she was a dialaholic, they could see it in her 
face. It always seemed that when she'd get an attack she'd go 
into a telephonic trance— a dialing daze, 
(continued on p. 14) 




L announces the final 
IHng In Anderson I3lm 



THE TMETA XI will 
teatf :»p.m. 

TER will be In the 
,1 at i p.m. Show is 
tori it free. 

■RESENTS L.A Bain 
(pin at i p.m. In Seaton 
, Final meetlno lor the 



ISOAY 

wilt meet In Union 





E draft 



oooooooo 



May 1978 



LOS ANG1 

have helped 

black and w 

dication the ) 

men in that repect, according to studies released 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Hon., May «, 197S 



Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 
the explosion i 



Mora bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME ( AP>— Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper 11 Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 



( Campus Bulletin ) 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATIONS FOR IDA Student Affairs 
committee chairman and I AC members are 
available In the SOS oliice. ground floor of the 
Union, and are Sue May » al 5 p m 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS applications are 
Ml no fatten In Justin 107 through May 11. 

SORORITY RUIN APPLICATIONS for fall 
WB are available In the Panhellenlc office. 
Holt i HOB. Deadline for registration i* July 
» 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN 

TEE will meet at City Park at S-30 p.m. for 



...a day 



by Shelley Parsons 



For many people, a little brother is 
someone who uses your biology book to 
color in or your shaving cream for 
whipped topping on his mud pies. He is 
someone you say good-bye to when you 
leave home and someone you miss very 
much while you're away. 

But for volunteers of the Big Brothers 
Program, a little brother is someone 
who looks up to you. Someone to share 
with and most important, someone who 
needs a friend. 

John Burk, junior in agricultural 
economics, has been a Big Brother for 
one year. He decided to volunteer 
because he missed his own brother 
Allan, age 13. John liked kids and 
wanted to have someone to share things 
and thoughts with. 

John's new little brother, Troy, is an 
eight -year old, energetic third-grader. 



rocket. The I 
Beirut, Leban 
or injured in f 
government 

It was the * 
guerrillas ha 
holy city, b 
been tradtitx. 
Israeli pohc*^ 
possible at Up 

Fearing rrl 
soldiers co 
Jerusalem ft 
heaviest wet 



Mondi 

CANBERR 

Mondale are 
focus on the 
Australia am 
this vast nat 

Mondale's 
capital city If 
Eastern torn 
Philippines a 

The vice pf 
of two mori 
refugees at / 
Forty -one hot 
landed on the 
takeover in \ 

CM tf 

WASHING 
Sunday that 
telligence ag 
tervention in 
Union. 

John Stock 
he command 
agency head 
allegations it 
program "SO 

Stockwell 
amounted to 
but withheld 
the congress: 
covert CIA 

Stockwell 
South Afri 
Union to 



Pfan litt 

LOS ANGI 

have helped 

black and w 

dication the ) 

men in that repeci, according to studies released 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



NEW SPURS will meet at the International 
Center at * p.m. 

TUESDAY 
NORML will meet at Brother's Tavern at 
T :30 p.m. 

McCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 
will meet at McCain Auditorium at 7 p.m. to 
plan for tall attractions. 

UTE CLUB will meet 
at I p.m. tor elections. 



INTS will meet at 
i rrniet in union 



Sharing, 

a rewarding escape 



announces the final 
no in Anderson Mlm 



'Hi THETA XI Will 

I1f:30p.m. 

IR will be In the 
tt I p.m. Show is 
Is free. 

ISENTS L. A. Bash 
rat I p.m. inSeaton 
Inal meet Ins for me 



It meet In Union 



Although there is a five year dif- 
ference between Allan and Troy, John 
thinks they're both intelligent and 
understand many of the things that he 
wouldn" t expect them to at their ages. 

"However, it's hard to really com- 
pare their likes and dislikes because of 
their different ages," John said. 

Every Saturday, John and Troy get 
together and spend the day as both 
brothers and friends. An average day 
might include a picnic or baseball game 
with other volunteers and little 
brothers. Possibly Troy and John might 
decide to go swimming by themselves 
and then head out for a burger. "Troy is 
pretty easy to please when it comes to 
planning activities," John said. 

"Sometimes he calls me during the 
week and asks if we can do a certain 
thing the following Saturday." 




Although Troy doesn't have one 
favorite activity, he loves to swim and 
he taught himself to dive, John boasts 
with brotherly pride. 

Besides being a time to share with 
Troy, John considers their Saturday 
outings as a relaxing time away from 
constant studying and the pressures of 
school. 

"It gives me an out, a change from 
being grown up and mature all the 
time," he said. "I can think young and 
really be myself." 

The highlight of being a volunteer, in 
John's opinion, is the special feeling of 
having someone like Troy look up to 
him. 

"I have the feeling he considers me a 
good friend. He needs me and I think 
deep down he really loves me." 

After a year, John understands how 
really important a Big Brother can be 
to the kids. He also realizes that being a 
Big Brother isn't for everyone. 

"I used to really push people to 
become a volunteer," John said. 

"But it takes a lot of time and 
patience. A Big Brother must have a 
real desire to do volunteer work to see 
results for himself and his little 
brother." 

"The kids are constantly wanting 
attention and many times it feels that 
you as the volunteer are doing all the 
giving. But when you take your little 
brother home and see him smile and 
thank you for a good time, you realize 
how much you're actually getting in 
return," John said. 

As a result of his experiences as a Big 
Brother, John has learned a lot about 
himself. 

"It has taught me a lot about having 
tolerance and patience with kids and 
my family." 
Sharing is a rewarding escape. 



Dimensions 



ions 

being 

sd. 

lie 103 
I) p.m. 
lay 10 




i draft 




know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Mon. May 8, 1978 



i — Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 
the explosion i 
rocket. The 1 
Beirut, Leban 
or injured in f 
government 

It was the 
guerrillas ha 
holy city. IV 
been tradti 
Israeli polii 
possible atti 

Fearing w 
soldiers co 
Jerusalem ft 
heaviest we 



Mondt 

CANBERR 

Mondale an 
focus on the 
Australia am 
this vast nat 

Mondale 's 
capital city 
Eastern ton 
Philippines a 

The vice pi 
of two mori 
refugees at k 
Forty -one boc 
landed on the 
takeover in \ 

CIA 

WASHING 
Sunday that 
telligence ag 
tervention in 
Union. 

John Stock 
he command 
agency head 
allegations it 
program "00 

Stockwell 
amounted to 
but withheld 
the congress 
covert CIA 

Stockwell 
South Afri 
Union to 



Plan lift 

LOS ANGE 

have helped 

black and w 

dication the ) 

men in that repect, accoraing to stuaies released 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



More bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME <AP>— Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 



Campus Bulletin ] 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATION* FOR SGA Sludenl Affairs 

commit lee chairman and I AC member s an 
avail able In the SGS office, ground floor of the 
Union, and art due May • at 5 p.m. 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS applications are 
being taken in Justin 107 through May 11. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for fall 
1WI are available In the Panhellenlc office. 
Holtt 1108. Deadline tor registration Is July 
15. 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN- 
TER will meet at City Park at 5 M p.m. lor 
dinner. 

NEW SPURS will meet at the International 
Canter at 6 p.m. 

TUESDAY 

NORML will meet at Brother's Tavern at 
r :30 p.m. 

MCCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 

will meet at McCain Auditorium at 7 p.m. to 
plan lor fall attractions. 

■lUTE CLUB will maet 
■if ■ p.m. for elections. 

r 

EfiENTS will meal at 
ttili meet In Union 



, L announces trie final 
< Ming In Anderson Mi m 



THE TMETA XI will 
•»et»!»p,m. 



" TER will be in the 
I at i p.m 
won Is fret. 



•1 t at l p.m. Show Is 



•RESENTS L.A.Bain 
fin at 1 p.m in Seaton 
. Final meeting for the 




know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Moo. May 1, 1§7t 



i — Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities hp**** * * *** ***** «»«■« °*» ™«» ininf«) •« 

the explosion c 
rocket. The Pa 
Beirut, Lebanc 
or injured in a 
government b 

It was the 1 
guerrillas had 
holy city. \ni 
been tradtion 
Israeli police 
possible attac 

Fearing mo 
soldiers con 
Jerusalem for 
heaviest weal 



Mondai 

CANBERR 

Mondale arriv 
focus on the i 
Australia and i 
this vast natioi 

Mondale's of 
capital city fro 
Eastern tour 
Philippines a 

The vice pn 
of two mora; 
refugees at Au 
Forty-one boal 
landed on the if 
takeover in VI 



CM W 

WASHING 

Sunday that 
telligence a 
tervention in 
Union. 

JohnStoc 
he comma 
agency headq 
allegations In 
program 

Stockwell 
amounted to 
but withheld 
the congress! 
covert CIA 

Stockwell 
South Afri 
Union to en 



Plan It 

LOS ANGB 

have helped 

black and 

dication the 

men in that 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



More bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME (AP)— Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 



[ Campus Bulletin ) 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATION! FOR SOA Student Affair* 
committee chairman and IAC member* are. 
available In the SGS office, ground floor of the 
Union, and are due May • at S p.m. 

COORDINATED UNDCRORADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETIC! applications are 
being taken In Justin 107 through May It. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for fall 
1971 are available in the Psnhellenic office, 
Halt) linn 




ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN 

TER will meet at City Park at S X) p.m. for 
dinner. 

NEW SPURS will meet at the international 
Center at a p.m. 

TUESDAY 

NOR ML will meet at Brother'* Tavern at 
7:30 p.m. 

McCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 
...... » .. ....... - uiiforiurn ,, 7 p . m to 



UTE CLUE will meet 
it I p.m, for •lections. 

IENTS Will meet at 



...a weekend 



• 'I meet In Union 



announces the final 
Ing in Anderson Ml m 



TUTTL 



HE THETA XI Will 
I at 9 30 p.m 



■R will be in the 
ft } p.m. Show is 
• Is free. 

ISCNTS L.A.Bash 
tat I p.m. In Seeton 
Inal meeting for the 



by Ann C. King 



"Let'agotoTuttie." 

Even if the time is 3 a.m. , even If the 
water is freezing, even if it is final 
week— this cry makes people grin. Just 
the idea of Tut tie Creek Reservoir is an 
escape from the structured academic 
scene in Manhattan. 



IAY 

il meet In Union 



an 




know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon., May SJfTS 



;_j _j j_ 



Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities her 
the explosion of 
rocket. The Pft 
Beirut, Lebanoi 
or injured in a ' 
government b 

It was the i 

guerrillas had 

holy city. Infc 

been tradtiontL 

Israeli police a 

possible attacl 

Fearing mo 1 
soldiers com 
Jerusalem for 
heaviest wear, 



Mora bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME <AP>— Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 



( Campus Bulletin ] 



E 



16,000 acres of fun 



Mondai 

CANBERRA, 

Mondale arriv 
focus on the i 
Australia and t 
this vast natioi 

Mondale's of 
capital city fro 
Eastern tour 
Philippines ana 

The vice pretj 
of two more 
refugees at Au 
Forty -one boats 
landed on the i 
takeover in Vi 

CIA bh 

WASHING!*) 

Sunday that '] 
telligence ager 
tervent ion in A \ 
Union. 

John Stockw i 
he commande 
agency headqi. 
allegations in 
program "60 J| 

Stockwell r 
amounted to a 
but withheld 
the congn 
covert CIA 

Stockwell 
South Afrit 
Union to enU 



Plan an; 



You leave the conglomeration of 
sandstone buildings that form campus; 
go north of town on a road that stret- 
ches wide and straight before you; fly 
the crest of a hill, then down around a 
long banked curve and you'll see one of 
the largest earthen dams in the 



May 1978 



country creating 16,000 acres of water, 

You can see it over the hood of your 
car, a wall of soil and rock holding back 
water, that if unleashed could flood 
Manhattan in ten minutes. It's strong 
It's big. And it's friendly. 

(continued on next page) 



S** 



7 /- 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATIONS FOR SOA Student Attain 
committee chairman and IAC member* are 
available tn the SGS oftlce. ground floor of the 
Union, and are due May • at 5 p. m . 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS applications are 
being taken In Justin 107 through May 1! 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS tor tall 
1971 *rt available In the Panhellenle office. 
noil i noe Deadline for registration li July 


ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN- 
TER will meet at City Park at S » p.m. tor 
dinner. 

NEW SPURS will meet at the international 
Center at A p.m. 

TUESDAY 

NORML will meet at Brother'* Tavern at 
7:30 p.m. 

MCCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 

will meet at McCain Auditorium at 7 p.m. to 




E CLUE will meet 
p.m. for elections. 


■ 


kts will meet at 




meet In Union 




vwuncM the final 
|in Anderton J5tm 




E THETA XI Will 
tf» :30 p.m. 




E will be in the 
I l p.m. Show I* 
Is free. 




ISENTS L.A.Bosh 

at I p.m. inSeaton 
rial meeting tor the 




AY 

I meet in Union 


I 


in 






Fol 




^^^■fons 


1 


i 

I 


eing 

n 


m 


I 

i 


u> 

ie 103 


1* 


I 


I p.m. 


i 


•* 


i 
i 


ay 10 



m 



ooooooo 



LOS ANGE' 

have helped t< 

black and wr 

dication the p 

men in that repecc, according to suiuies reiea&cu 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



L 



know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at l p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Moo., May 8, 1 *78 



" 



Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 
the explosion o* * 
rocket. The Pa 
Beirut, Lebanoi 
or injured in a ' 
government b 

It was the » 
guerrillas had 
holy city. Inri 
been tradtioruL 
Israeli police a 
possible attacl 

Fearing mo* 
soldiers com 
Jerusalem for 
heaviest wear. 



Ia soviet-made Katvusha 



Mom bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME ( AP>— Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper 11 Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 
family on Friday. That was the day 



( Campus Bulletin ) 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATION! FOR SOA Student Affairs 
committee chairman and IAC members are 
available in the SCS office, ground floor of the 
Union, and are due May fat S p.m. 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS applications are 

being taken in Justin 107 through May 11. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for fall 
1971 are available In the Panhellenlc office. 
Holti MOB, Deadline for registration Is July 
33. 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN 
TER will meet at City Park at 5:30 p.m. for 



NEW SPURS will meet at the international 
Center ate p.m. 

TUESDAY 

NORML will meet at Brother's Tavern at 
7:30 p.m. 

MCCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 
will meet at McCain Auditorium at 7 p.m. to 
plan for fall attractions. 

MUTf; CU)B wi|( m#t , 

• S p.m. for elections. 



[NTS will meet at 



Mondai 

CANBERRA 

Mondale arriv 
focus on the i 
Australia and i 
this vast natioi 

Mondale's of 
capital city fro 
Eastern tour 
Philippines aft 

The vice prp 
of two mori 
refugees at Au 
Forty -one boat! 
landed on the i 
takeover in Vi 

CtAbl 

WASHINGT 

Sunday that 
telligence age 
tervention in . 
Union. 

John Stock? 
he command* 
agency headq 
allegations in 
program "60 

Stockwell i 
amounted to ; 
but withheld i 
the congress! 
covert CIA of 

Stockwell s 
South Africa: 
Union to entc 



Plan lift 



(continued from p. 91 

' ' Going to Tuttle is as much a part of school as eating, ' ' said 
David Gnaegy, fifth year student in landscape architecture, 
"You've got to take time out." 

The reasons for spending time at the lake vary. Jan Eddy, 
senior in physical education, goes to Tuttle to get away from 
the city, the people and school. 

But Eileen Kingston, freshman in office administration, 
has a different point of view. "It is a place to sunbathe 
without having to deal with guys scoping from the roof of Van 
Zile with binoculars, or water balloon raids, or a cold 
drenching from the firehose of the Pi Kappa Alpha 
f iretruck," she said. For her Tuttle is an escape from the four 
walls of her room in Ford Hall. 

Fred Olson, freshman in agricultural economics, thinks 
going out to Tuttle is a social affair. "I think most guys go out 
to Tuttle to scope," he said. "It's a change of scenery." 

His opinion is the same as many who flock to the shores of 
Tuttle Reservoir and "Tuttle Puddle." Mentally a person 
needs a break once in a while. TutUe provides this to the 
students, teachers and administrators of K -State. 

What exactly is an escape? Webster's dictionary defines it 
as the desire to get away from something one does not want 
to incur, endure or encounter. 

To give people an escape, Tuttle offers almost any sport 
imaginable. There is space by "Tuttle Puddle" to play 
football or baseball. There is room to throw a Frisbee or fly a 



kite and the hills around the reservoir provide rock climbers 
and dirt bikers with a variety of challenges. 

The 60-mile long reservoir has space for water skiing, 
swimming, sailing, scuba diving, "tubing" (riding a tractor 
inner tube pulled behind a ski boat), as well as for fishing. 

"There are White Bass, Flathead Catfish and good Crappe 
in Tuttle," said Eric Johnson, freshman in geology. 

"I fish the coves at the north end of Tuttle," he continued. 
"You want to fish the coves, close to shore, when the fish 
come in to feed. I really like to fish, and I fish to relax. They 
go hand in hand." 

"That is what a sport is for, to get you away from it all," 
said Rick Pat ton, graduate student in business. "Sailing is a 
sport very near and dear to my heart. And girls like to go 
sailing." 

"I don't like to just lie in the sun. I like to be doing 
something," Patton said. "If you're just lying there you can't 
stop thinking about pressures. Sailing takes concentration; 
you can really get away." 

"For me it's like downhill skiing. I like to ski right on the 
edge of losing control. I can equal this feeling in sailing. It's 
my way of relaxing," Patton said. 

Relief is not always spelled R-O-L-A-I-D-S. Everyone has 
something they do to "get away from it all." Sometimes the 
work just has to wait, the tests come and go without a ner- 
vous breakdown. And eventually you take the same wide, 
straight road back to town. 



meet In Union 



announces the final 
no in Anderson mm 



HE THETA XI will 

at? Mp m 

' 1R will be in the 
at I p.m. Show Is 
« is free, 

ESENTS L A. Bash 
i at I p.m. InSeaton 
Inal meeting for me 



MY 

,t| meet 



in Union 



1 



ions 

being 

Bd. 

lie 103 
p.m. 
lay 10 




10 



LOS ANGf 

have helped 

black and w 

dication the \ 

men in that repect, accoraing 10 stuuies tmmmi 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



Dimensions 



know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Moo., May «, 1«78 



i — Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 
the explosion of a single Soviet-made Katyusha 
rocket. The Pa 
Beirut, Lebanoi 
or injured in a * 
government b ...8 W86K 

It was the i 



A thumb 
goes up, 
a car goes 
by... 

by Sara Ben/gnus 



Moro bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME <AP>— Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 
family on Friday. That was the day 



Campus Bulletin ) 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATIONS FOR SOA Student Affairs 
committee chairman and IAC member* are 
available In the SGS office, ground floor ol the 
Union, am) are due May * at J p.m. 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS application* are 
being taken in Juttln 107 through May U. 

SORORITY RUIN APPLICATIONS for fall 
1978 are aval labia In the Panheilenk office, 
Haiti HOB Deadline for registration it July 
IS. 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN- 
TER will meat at City Park at S 30 p.m. for 
dinner, 

NEW SPURS will meet at the International 
Center at A p.m. 

TUESDAY 

nor ml will meet at Brother'*, Tavern it 
7:30 p.m. 

MCCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 
will meet at McCain Auditorium at 1 p.m. to 
plan tor fall attractions. 

MUTE CLUB Will meet 

»• I p.m. for election*. 



ENTS will meet at 



guerrillas had 
holy city. Int 
been tradtiona 
Israeli police a 
possible attacj 
Fearing mo» 
soldiers com 
Jerusalem for 
heaviest wear 

Mondai 

CANBERRA, 

Mondale arriv 
focus on the ; 
Australia and < 
this vast natioi 

Mondale's of 
capital city fro 
Eastern tour 
Philippines an 

The vice pret 
of two more 
refugees at Au 
Forty -one boats 
landed on the t 
takeover in Vi 

CIA bli 

WASHING!* 

Sunday that ' 
telligence ago 
tervention in A 
Union. 

John Stockw 
he commande 
agency headqi 
allegations in 
program "60 I 

Stockwell r 
amounted to a 
but withheld ii 
the congresslc 
covert CIA op 

Stockwell st 
South African 
Union to entei 



Plan llttt 

LOS ANGE! 
have helped U **** 1978 

black and wr 
dication the pi 

men in that repeci, accoraing u> soiaies reieuseu 
Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s, 



The sign read "Certified Harmless 
Hitchhiker." He wouldn't guarantee 
that it got rides, but it brought him 
many smiles. 

Dave Hughes, junior in journalism 
and mass communications, didn't 
always hold a sign; most of the time he 
just thumbed it. This way of life took 
him to California, New Jersey and 
several towns in Kansas. 

The first time he hitchhiked was to a 
bluegrass festival in Winfield. Neither 
he nor his friends had cars, so they 
thumbed rides. 

"Hitchhiking is an interesting ex- 
perience because you are out on the 
road, depending on other people for a 
ride and you are on your own , " he said, 

Dave and a friend, Ed Brophy, senior 
in construction science, experienced 
this dual feeling of dependency and 
independency as they traveled to Palm 
Springs, Calif., over spring break in 
1974. 

Ed asked Dave along and for "no 
sane reason" he agreed. Dave thought 
that because it was spring break he 
should do something to break the 
monotony. It was a "spur of the 
moment" decision. 

The trip to California cost him only 
$35 and took about four days, longer 
than normal because of a day and a half 
delay in Albuquerque, N.M. 

Earlier they had hitched a ride with a 
man from Wichita, who had been 
visiting friends. He had long, scraggly 
hair, a beard and drove an old green 
Chevy pickup with a camper. 

Using this man as an example, Dave 
emphasized the friendliness of people. 
The man and his friends allowed Dave 
and Ed to sleep in their house and gave 
them several meals. 

"Geography doesn't have anything to 
do with it; no matter where you go, 
people are people," he said. And he met 
all kinds. 

The next ride was in a beat-up old 
Ford. The man had a jaw full of tobacco 



and a spitting can between his legs. The 
three switched driving to make better 
time, and continued through the night. 
Dave and Ed pitched in money for gas 
and oil on the stretch from Grants, 
N.M. to a mile outside of Needles, 
Calif. The last mile the car ran out of 
gas and because "it seemed the thing to 
do" the three pushed the car into town 
at mid-morning and began hitching 
again. 

The next day, after several more 
rides they got to Palm Springs, Calif. 
where they spent the afternoon sitting 
in a park just watching people. That 
night, because they were "living on a 
shoestring," they slept on the roof of a 
bathroom. 

Dave usually carried a pack with a 
sleeping bag and a coat tied on the 
outside. On the journey to California he 
kept a log of his feelings, the people he 
met and the towns they traveled 
through. 

By looking through this log he can 
recall meeting hitchhikers, in which 
instant friendships were born. It was "a 
sort of camaraderie," he said. They 
would discuss how their luck had been 
running and the good roads to travel. 

There is also an unspoken rule about 
positioning on the road, he said. There 
are certain advantageous spots, such as 
close to the entrance of the road where 
the cars are going slower to get on. 
When you are waiting for a ride you 
don't take a better position than 
someoone who has been there longer. 
It's like waiting in line, Dave said. You 
don't crowd in. 

He also said that he believed that 
women have a better chance of getting 
a ride than men. 

"Sometimes it makes me think I 
was born the wrong sex, " he said. 

He doesn't think about the danger of 
hitchhiking and never has run into any 
trouble. 

"There is a lot of trust involved," 
(continued on p. 14) 



II meet In Union 



announces the final 
na In Anderton Ml m 



HE THETA XI Will 
atV:30p.m. 

ER will be In the 
at l p.m. Show is 
ti is free. 

tESENTS L.A.Bash 
Inetlp.m. InSeaton 
t Inai meeting for the 



DAY 

III meet In Union 



ions 

being 

td. 

lie 103 
p. in- 
lay 10 




draft 



ooooooo 



know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Moo.,M»y«,1»78 



Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 



the explosion of a 
rocket. The Pa* " 
Beirut, Lebanoi 
or injured in a " 
government far* 

It was the 1 
guerrillas had . 
holy city. Ind 
been tradtionau 
Israeli police ai 
possible attack 

Fearing mot 
soldiers com 
Jerusalem for 1 
heaviest weap 



Mondal 

CANBERRA. 

Mondale arriv* 
focus on the i 
Australia and c 
this vast natioi 

Mondale's of 
capital city fro; 
Eastern tour * 
Philippines anc 

The vice pres 
of two more 
refugees at Auf 
Forty-one boats 
landed on the nf 
takeover in VU 

CM Mt 

WASH1NGTO 
Sunday that " 
telligence agen 
tervention in A: 
Union. 

John Stockwt 
he commanded 
agency headqu 
allegations in a 
program "60 K 

Stockwell sa 
amounted to a 
but withheld in 
the congressioi 
covert CIA ope 

Stockwell sai 
South Africans 
Union to enter 



Plan litth 



*» — i_t j„ ir*.*i n .«Vi< 



...a summer 



More bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME (AP)— Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 
fomiiu nn Friday That was the day 



[ Campus Bulletin ) 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATION! FOR SO A Student Affairs 
committee chairman and I AC members are 
available In the SGS office, ground floor of the 
Union, and are due May* at 5 p.m. 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROORAM IN DIETETICS applications are 
being taken in Justin 107 through May 13. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for fall 
1V71 are available In the Panheltenlc office, 
Holti HOB Deadline for registration is July 
75 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN- 
TER will meet at City Park at S:36 p.m for 

dinner 

NEW SPURS will meet at the international 
Center attp.m. 

TUESOAY 
NORML will meet at Brother's Tavern at 
7:30 p.m. 

MCCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 
will meet at McCain Auditorium af 7 p.m. to 
plan for fall attractions. 

veil Conor ■•>*r HUTI CLUB will meet 
,m. lor elections. 



■TS will meet at 



'Solitude... 

not alone but by myself 



by Peggy Patchen 



eel in union 



ounces the final 
■» Anderson 12 tm 



THETA XI will 
t: 30 p.m. 

will be In the 
p.m. Show is 
free 

NTS L.A.Basn 

• p.m. In Seaton 
meeting tor the 



In Union 



She found herself climbing a 14,030 peak, completing a 12- 
mile marathon run and surviving three days and nights 
without food in completion of a unique summer course called 
Outward Bound 

"You get so tired you want to quit. You've got 50 pounds on 
your back and you want to sit down and you can't You don't 
know how much you can do until you do it. And when you do, 
it really builds your self-confidence. You really feel good,'' 
said Cassie Utz, senior in agricultural journalism, who 
decided to "find herself" by traveling to the wilderness 
regions of the Colorado mountains three years ago. 

Outward Bound is an experience of self-discovery and 
personal growth which uses nature as its medium. Par- 
ticipants are presented with a series of increasingly difficult 
physical and mental tasks. Against seemingly impossible 
odds, they must call upon unrecognized reserves of in- 
dividual strength and perserverance. 

Utz traveled to Denver, Colo., between her freshman and 
sophomore years to begin the Outward Bound session 
lasting from June 12 to July 4. 

"I was in a group of 36 or so. We went from Denver all the 
way into the 'booniea.'" 

One of the first things Utz was told to do was to change her 
clothes in front of the rest of the group. 

"We were in this 'humongous' meadow; I mean it was 
really empty, and they tell us to change our clothes. Now if 
you can imagine: you don't know anybody here and you 
have to change clothes in front of these people, includinc 
guys," she recalled 

After changing clothes, each person was given a full back- 
pack containing necessities such as a sleeping bag, water 
bottle, tin cup and a large spoon for meals. 

They were not allowed to take luxuries such as 
moisturizers and make-up. 

"Make-up! Shoot, you can't even take a razor. I did have a 
little mirror and comb." 

Outdoor skills such as map and compass reading, first aid, 
campcraf t and rope handling were taught the first few days. 
Rock climbing and rappelling followed the initial training. 
"The first time you ever climb is something else," Utz 
said. "There are teeny holes in the rocks, and you have to 
stick your toes and your fingers in those holes while you're 
on the face of a cliff. Nobody had done stuff like that " 



12 



LOS ANGEL 

have helped to 
black and whi 
dication the pi — « 

men in that ret,..., — w 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



She climbed and rappelled down one cliff the first day. The 
second day two cliffs were conquered. 

"The second time down, I was in tears. It's bard to walk 
backwards over a cliff," Utz said 

The next day was spent in Lake City, Colo., population 50, 
where they painted a medical center as a service project in 
exchange for the use of the town's stream. 

The students backpacked even farther into the wilderness 
where they ascended Wetterhorn, a 14,030-foot peak. The 
mountains had received a foot of snow a few days prior to 
the expedition and they were continually wet, cold and tired 
according to Utz, 

She soon began to wonder if Outward Bound was worth her 
while. After eight days in the mountains, she wrote in her 
journal: 

Going slow until the rocks. The view from the top was 
the most beautiful view I've ever seen. I didn't feel 
ecstacy — expected, though I'm beginning to wonder 
if O.B. is going to help me figure out myself and life. I 
want it to; but I don't feel the change. Maybe it's 
there, but I just don't realize it" 

She talked to her patrol leader, Diane, who told her to 
figure out her priorities. 

"I had to figure out what would really make me happy, 
and then do it," Utz said Because of her leader's counciling, 
she continued with Outward Bound 

The highlight of the course was a solo. Each person spent 
three days and three nights on their own, with a minimum of 
equipment and no food. 

Most of her time on the solo was spent making her bed 
warmer. She had no sleeping bag, only a tarp. 

Utz missed eight meals while on her solo. In her journal 
she scribbled: 

I'm beginning to get hungry. I'm not in pain or 
anything but it's easy to fantasize about food. Oh well, 
tomorrow at this time I will have had a meal. 

After the solo, those on the trip looked like living 
(continued on p. 14) 



Dimensions 



ins 

eing 

i 

e 103 

■ p.m. 
ylO 



.' 



draft 




SOOOOOO 



know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon. t May 8, 1»7» 



Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 
the explosion of a single Soviet-made Katyusha 
rocket. The P«* ••-■•—--- 
Beirut, Lebanon 
or injured in a ** 
government br' 

It was the 1 
guerrillas had . 
holy city. Ind 
been tradtionai 
Israeli police ai 
possible attack I 

Fearing mot 
soldiers com. 
Jerusalem for' 
heaviest weap 



Mora bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME < AP)-Aldo Moro bid bis 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 
family on Friday. That was the day 



( Campus Bulletin ) 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATIONS FOR SOA Student Affairs 
committee chairman and IAC members art 
available in the SGS oHIee, oround floor of the 
Union, and *rt due May * at 5 p. m 

COORDINATED WNOERORADUATi 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS application! are 
being taken In Justin 107 through May 11. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for tall 
1?TI art available In th« Panhtllenic office, 
Holti HOB Deadline for registration it July 
«. 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEH 
TER will meet at City Park at S:M p m. for 
dinner. 

NEW SPURS will meet at the International 
Center at* p. m 

TUESDAY 
NOR ML will meet at Brother's Tavern at 
7. 30 p.m. 

McCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 
will meet at McCain Auditorium at J p.m. to 
plan for fall attractions. 



Kill IBM 



skeletons, with sunken eyes and hollowed cheeks, Utz said. 

The next step for Utz and four others, whom she had 
never met, was to hike 15 miles on a four-day expedition 
without any supervision. 

"The leader said one thing: 'Don't go down Boulder 
Gulch. ' Well, we went down it I was in tears. We were three 
miles from where we were suppose to be ! " Utz said. 

Through much bickering and fighting, her group finally 
found their way back to camp. They then prepared their 
blistered, sore feet for a 12- mile marathon run, the final test 
for those who had made it this far. After the run, Utz and the 
others were given a feast. 

After subsisting mainly on cheese, crackers, honey and 
noodles for more than two weeks, the Outward Bounders 
finally received eggs, bread, fruit and vegetables. 

"Sometimes, we did get fresh vegetables and fresh fruit; 
but you have never tasted fresh fruit and vegetables until 
you haven't had them for two weeks," Utz said. 

Graduation followed dinner and the "students" received 
their clean clothes. 

"I was putting on those clean clothes and everything 
seemed so far away. I loved Outward Bound, but I was ready 
to get back to civilization," Utz said 

Civilization, however, had changed since the beginning of 
her 21-day vigil. 

"I felt like the walls were too close and the ceiling was too 
low. I felt so confined, like I was in a cage." she said. 

"Outward Bound was hard to explain, unless you were 
there experiencing it. I think everybody should experience 
something like that. You meet a part of you that you didn't 
think existed. You really like yourself. 'I'm ail right after 
all.' The whole thing about Outward Bound is challenge." 



Mondai 

CANBERRA, 

Mondale arriv 
focus on the i 
Australia and c 
this vast natioi 

Mondale 's of 
capital city froc 
Eastern tour * 
Philippines anc 

The vice pres 
of two more 
refugees at Aur 
Forty -one boats 
landed on the n n 
takeover in Vit 

CIA bit 

WASHINGTO 
Sunday that " 
telligence agen 
tervention in A: 
Union. 

John Stockwt 
he commanded 
agency headqu 
allegations in s 
program "60 16 

Stock well sa 
amounted to a 
but withheld in. 4 
the congressioi 
covert CIA ope 

Stockwell sai 
South Africans 
Union to enter 



Plan link 

LOS ANGEL 

have helped to 
black and whi 
dication the pr •*■¥ 1978 

men in that rej.__, , 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 




-MUTE CLUB will men 
at I p.m. tor elections. 

NTS will meet at 

I meet In Union 



mnouncw the final 
ig in Anderson i) tm 



-IE THETA XI Will 
at? :30 p.m. 

1R will be in the 
It I p.m. Show IS 
lis free 

ESENTS LA Bash 
i at I p m In Seatort 
Inal meeting for the 



IAY 

I meet In Union 



in 




ions 

ieing 

Id. 

ie 103 

I p.m. 
ay 10 




draft 



Jr%tP%J^J%^P^J\jr 



know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




-Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1978, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 



KANSAS STATE COUEOIAN, Monday a, 1>7» 



Authorities to n 
the explosion • 
rocket. The Pi 
Beirut, Lebanc 
or injured in a 
government bt 

It was the J 
guerrillas had 
holy city, md 
been tradtioni 
Israeli police i 
possible attacl 

Fearing moi 
soldiers com. 
Jerusalem for 
heaviest weap 

Mondai 

CANBERRA 

Mondale arriv 
focus on the 
Australia and ■ 
this vast natio 

Mondale' s oi 
capital city fit 
Eastern tour 
Philippines an 

The vice pr# 
of two more 
refugees at At 
Forty-one boat 
landed on the r 
takeover in VI 



iA A«uk tirmmon lira a iniiirart *n 



Mora bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME <AP)— Aldo Moro bid bis 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Home 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 



fCarr^ 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATIONS FOR SOA Stuoent Affairs 
commtttoe chairman and IAC member* art 
available in the SOS office, ground floor of the 
Union, and are due May • at 5 p.m. 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS application* are 
being taken In Justin 107 through May 11. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS tor fall 
1WS are available in the Panhellenlc office, 
Hold HOB. Deadline for registration li July 



Better Moments... 

(continued from p. 4) 
change his lifestyle. Transcendental 
Meditation is a very practical thing for 
the doctor, housewife, businessman or 
anyone that is active," be said. 

"Meditators generally report the 
technique to be a pleasant, restful, 
relaxing experience. However, it is not 
only for the 20 minutes twice a day that 
people meditate, but rather for the 
effect it has on all the activities of the 
day." 

There are four primary ways TM can 
improve people's lives, according to 
Mean. 

The first area is in terms of unfolding 
the full potential of the mind. The 
second is in terms of improving 
physical health. The third is in terms of 
improving the interaction between an 
individual and the environment around 
him and the fourth is in terms of world 
peace. 

People begin TM with the objective of 
gaining enlightenment for themselves. 
But what they have found through 
scientific study is that in those areas 
where more and more people are 
meditating the society as a whole 
improves. Crime and illness rates go 
down, Mears said. 

"When we talk about TM, we talk 
about creating an ideal society, we 
mean it in a every practical sense. If 
more people are utilizing more of their 
potential, they are happier and can 
very easily improve the surroundings 
around them," Mears said. Dr. John 
Paul Bonkay, a French 
neurophysiologist, has done studies 
that illustrate when someone is using 
the TM technique to meditate, the brain 
waves from the left to the right cerebral 
hemispheres are synchronized in 
frequency. This implies that the 
intuitive and artistic portion of the 
brain and the analytical portion 
workogether to create clearer thinking. 
"People have reported for years that 
when they are done meditating, their 
thinking seems clear," Mears said. 

Tests have also been done showing 
that learning ability improves and on 
some tests even intelligence improves. 
Both long and short term memory 
appears improved when a person 
practices the TM program. 

"The key here is that progress Is at 
stake, whether we are a student, 
businessman, educator or whatever. 
Stress is present," Mears said. 
Scientests have told us that stress can 
be relieved by deep rest. What is 
LOS ANGE 
have helped t 
black and wl_. 
dication the prt 

men in that repcvL, «cv*jiuihk iu siutues reuwaeu 
Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



necessary to relieve a person is a 
technique that can provide a rest deep 
enough so that the stress isn't ac- 
cumulated in the system day after day. 
When stress is accumulated, it becomes 
one of the root causes of 
psychosomiatic illnesses. 

"TM provides a rest even deeper than 
the deepest point of deep sleep, so in- 
stead of building up that stress day in 
and day out, the system is allowed to 
eliminate it," Mears said. 

"The more fresh, rested and clearer 
thinking we are, we experience 
everything about us in an improved 
way." 

Transcendental Meditation technique 
is especially vital in education, ac- 
cording to Mears. He added that if 
someone is going to be truly educated, 
they have to expand their capacity to 
think, their capacity to be conscious 
and their ability to take in the in- 
formation. 

"TM brings about a fulfillment in the 
field of education because it expands 
the container of knowledge, ' ' he said. 

"Basically, it is a do-it-yourself 
program. The way a person gets the 
benefits is to meditate regularly on his 
own," Mears said. 



ClAbl 

WASHINGT 

Sunday that 
telligence age 
tervention in i 
Union. 

John Stocky 
he command* 
agency headq 
allegations in 
program "60 

Stockwell I 
amounted to i 
but withheld i 
the congressii 
covert CIA of 

Stockwell si 
South Africai 
Union to ente 



Plan lim 



u 

nnay iv/o 




Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



Thumbin'... 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN- 
TER will meet at City Park at J » p.m. for 

dinner. 

NEW SPURS will meet at the International 

Center at 6 p.m. 

TUESDAY 
NORML will meet at Brother'! Tavern at 
f:»p.m. 

MCCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 
will meat at McCain Auditorium at 7 p.m. to 

-NUTE CLUB will meet 
•t I p.m . tor election*. 
r. 

ilNTf will m««i at 
will meet m union 



Dialaholic... 



( continued from p. 5) 

At first , when Judy had the attack, 
her friends just thought that she bad to 
go to the bathroom. But, as the 
semester progressed, Judy's attacks 
became more intense. 

The attack started with the trance, 
then her dialing finger would start to 
jerk and then she would dash to the 
phone. Once she dialed one, she was 
"well" again. 

What will become of Judy? Is there a 
cure for her dialing disease? There is 
no answer. Maybe she should quit 
school and go to the places she has been 
dialing to all year long. Or maybe she 
should have her dialing finger 
surgically removed. Oh well. 

Judy keeps on dialing and the 
operators keep connectng her. Maybe if 
the operators strike she'll be saved 
from the disease. But it's doubtful. 

One consolation is that the dialing 
disease is shared by many people. 
Possibly , someone will start a Dialers 
Anonymous Association. DA. A? Why 
not. 



(continued from p. 11) 
Davesaid, "on both sides." 

"That is a feature of hitchhiking, it 
tells you about human nature and you 
know there are still people who are nice 
and trusting." 

Sometimes it can be frustrating, 
though, like waiting eight hours for a 
ride, which happened on his way to 
Middletown, N.J. , his hometown. 

Dave was on a bypass in 
Indianapolis, Ind., in a bad spot, at a 
bad time. He waited and "was almost to 
the point of tears" wanting to yell out to 
the passing cars: "Why can't I get a 
ride?" 

A car finally stopped and picked him 
up and he was on his way again. That 
trip was unusual as he was picked up by 
two hearses. 

At dawn one morning a man gave 
Dave a ride and had Dave drive him to 
the factory where he worked. The man 
slept on the way. 

The same trip he slept alone in the 
Appalachian Mountains. But he seldom 
got lonely. 

"It's hard to get lately when all the 
cars are whizzing by," Dave explained. 

He often spent the night just off the 
roadside and packed a sandwich to eat 
to save time from going into town. 

"It's a spartan way of life," he said. 

It's tough sometimes, with little sleep 
and subsisting on one meal a day, but it 
is a "romantic alternative" to other 
ways of travel. 

It's a challenge, an adventure and 
now Dave can say, "Hey I did it! " 



, announce* the final 

lino in Anderson «lm 



THE THETA XI will 
* 81930 p m 

'ER will be In the 
at 1 p.m. Snow It 
on i J (ret 

RESENTS L.ABa»h 
ilnatlp.m. InSeaton 
Final meeting for the 



iDAY 

rill meet in Union 



k 

ions 

being 

sd. 

tie 103 
D p.m. 
ay 10 





J 



draft 



JOOOOOO 



Dimensions 



aw m 

know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




-Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rackets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 
the explosion of a single Soviet-made Katyusha 

rocket. The Pa" " " 

Beirut, Lebanoi 
or injured in a " 
government br* 

It was the I 
guerrillas had . 
holy city. Ind 
been tradtionai 
Israeli police ai 
possible attacl 

Fearing moi 
soldiers com 
Jerusalem font 
heaviest weap 

Mondal 

I 
CANBERRA, 

Mondale arriv 
focus on the 1 
Australia and c 
this vast natioi 

Mondale's of 
capital city fro; 
Eastern tour * 
Philippines anc 

The vice pres 
of two more 
refugees at Aiv 
Forty -one boats 
landed on the 9r 
takeover in Vit 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon.M.y S, f»7« 



More bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME ( AP)— Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 
family on Friday. That was the day 



US 



Bulletin ) 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATIONS FOR SOA Student Attain 

committee chairman and I AC member s are 
available In the SGS office, around floor of the 
Union, and are due May 9 at 5 o m 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS applications are 
being taken In Justin 1D7 through May 1 J 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS lor tall 
1971 are available In the Panhellenic office, 
Holli HOB. Deadline lor registration It July 
IS. 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN. 
TEE will meet at City Park at s M p m for 
dinner 

NEW SPURS will meet at the International 
Center at 4 p. rn. 

TUESDAY 
NORML Will meet at Brother's Tavern at 
7 30p,m 

MCCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 

will meat at McCain Auditorium at 7 p.m. to 
plan for tall attractions. 

mil ceniT •*■**- tiuTE CLUE will meet 
at I p.m. tor elections. 



DINTS will meet at 



CM bit 

WASHINGTC* 

Sunday that " 
telligence agen 
tervention in A 
Union. 

John Stockwt 
he commanded 
agency headqu 
allegations in e 
program "60 U 

Stockwell sa' 
amounted to a 
but withheld in? 
the congressior 
covert CIA ope 

Stockwell sai 
South Africans 
Union to enter 

Plan little 




Mf\OOW 



vili meet in Union 



. announces the tlnal 
ling In Anderson 231 m 



THE THETA XI will 
wet 9:30 p.m. 

fER will be In the 
at 1 p.m. Show Is 

on i> free 

RESENTS LA Bash 
lin all p.m. in Sea Ion 

Final meeting for the 



;day 

rill meet in Union 






ions 
being 

Jd. 

ie 103 



s&fc&d^ 



'alvO. ^tnVrJU li 



! 



p.m. 
ay 10 






J yfi^n 



"X^ff^ 




Ttt5^ 




draft 



^oooooo 



May 1978 



LOS ANGELt 

have helped to 
black and whit 
dication the pit 

men in that repcvi., atLAJiuius w amines reieaseu 

Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Hon., May 8,1 Wd 



t nf^A I^AflHlftHA 



Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 
the explosion of ~ ~ : — '- •***ui 
rocket. The Pal 
Beirut, Lebanon 
or injured in a ' 
government bul 

It was the fii 
guerrillas had f 
holy city. Inde 
been tradtiona 
Israeli police 
possible attac 

Fearing mo: 
soldiers com 
Jerusalem for 
heaviest wea 



Mondaf 

CANBERRA, ' 
Mondale arriv 
focus on the i 
Australia and 
this vast natio 

Mondale's of 
capital city fro; 
Eastern tour 
Philippines a 

The vice p 
of two more 
refugees at A 
Forty-one boa 
landed on the 
takeover in Vi 



CIA bl 

WASHINGTC 

Sunday that ' 
telligence ager ; 
tervent ion in 
Union. 

John Stock 
he command 
agency headq 
allegations in 
program "60 1 

Stockwell 
amounted to a 
but withheld in 
the congressio 
covert CIA op< 

Stockwell sa 
South African 
Union to enter 



More bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME ( AP)-Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 



Campus Bulletin ] 



, BhJUl * 



f FU#*t Mftt* #W#. *#* 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATIONS FOR SCA Student Affairs 
committee chairman and I AC member* are 
available In live SGS office, ground floor of the 

Union, and are due May » at 5 pm 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS applications are 
being taken in Justin 107 through May li. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATION! for fall 
mi are available in the Penhellenic office, 

Holli HOB Deadline for registration ll July 
IS. 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CCN 
TIR will meet at CH» Perk at S30 p.m. for 
dinner 

NEW SPURS will meet at the International 
Center at a p.m. 

WMMY 

NOR Ml will meet at Brottter* Tavern at 
7 :30 p.m. 

MCCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 
will meet al McCain Auditorium at 7 p.m to 
plan for fall attraction! 

ote CLUI win meet 
■t I p m for elections. 

iOENTS will meet al 



meet in union 



announces the linal 
AQ In Ander jon 221 m 



THE TMETA XI will 
«at«.30p.i 

|R will be In the 
at 1 p.m. Show it 
- Is free. 

ESENTS LA Bash 
) St I p.m. tnSeeton 

inal meeting for the 



Plan littl 







k>oooooo 



LOS ANGE1 

have helped ti 
black and wh 

dicatlOn the piu^iomo iiaic uwic iuw.ii •«• ummm 

men in that repect, according to studies released 
Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon., May 8, 1»7» 



Boldface 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

PLO rockets hit Jerusalem 

JERUSALEM— Yasser Arafat's Palestinian 
guerrillas claimed responsibility Sunday for the 
first rocket attack in Jerusalem since 1976, and 
said it was timed to coincide with this week's 30th 
anniversary of Israeli independence. 

Authorities here said one woman was injured in 
the explosion of a single Soviet-made Katyusha 
rocket. The Palestine Liberation Organization in 
Beirut, Lebanon, said several persons were killed 
or injured in a "heavy rocket attack" and Israeli 
government buildings were damaged. ' 

It was the first time in two years that Arab 
guerrillas had fired a Katyusha rocket into the 
holy city. Independence day celebrations have 
been tradtional targets for Arab terrorism, and 
Israeli police and civilians were on alert against 
possible attacks. 

Fearing more rockets might be fired, Israeli 
soldiers combed hills and villages around 
Jerusalem for the launcher of the rocket, one of the 
heaviest weapons in the Arab guerrilla arsenal. 

Mondale stops in Australia 

CANBERRA, Australia— Vice President Walter 
Mondale arrived Sunday for talks expected to 
focus on the influx of Vietnamese refugees to 
Australia and on beef and uranium exports from 
this vast nation-continent. 

Mondale's official U.S. jet flew to Australia's 
capital city from Indonesia, third stop of the Far 
Eastern tour that took him last week to the 
Philippines and Thailand. 

The vice president's arrival coincided with that 
of two more Vietnamese boats carrying 70 
refugees at Australia's northern port of Darwin. 
Forty -one boats and more than 1,200 refugees have 
landed on the northern coast since the Communist 
takeover in Vietnam three years ago. 

CM blunders Angola job 

WASHINGTON— A former CIA official said 
Sunday that "blundering stupidity" by the in- 
telligence agency paved the way for massive in- 
tervention in Angola later by Cuba and the Soviet 
Union. 

John Stockwell, a 12-year CIA veteran who said 
he commanded the CIA's Angola task force in 
agency headquarters at Langley, Va., made the 
allegations in an interview on the CBS television 
program "60 Minutes." 

Stockwell said the CIA embarked on what 
amounted to a "secret war" in the torn country, 
but withheld information about its activities from 
the congressional committees set up to oversee 
covert CIA operations. 

Stockwell said intervention by the CIA and the 
South Africans provoked Cuba and the Soviet 
Union to enter the conflict. 

Plan little help for black men 

LOS ANGELES— Affirmative action programs 
have helped to nearly equalize wages earned by 
black and white women, but there is little in- 
dication the programs have done much for black 
men in that repect, according to studies released 
Sunday by two Rand Corp. economists. 

The studies by James Smith and Finis Welch 
show that black men now earn about three-fourths 
as much as white men while black women have 
just about achieved parity with white women. 

"Because hiring a black woman met both race 
and sex quotas for employers, the affirmative 
action thrust may have given black women the 
advantage in the job market," the economists 
said. 



Local Forecast 

Partly cloudy today with high in the upper 60s. Low 
tonight in the 40s. Mostly sunny Tuesday with high in the 
lower 70s. 



More bids family 
farewell in letter 

ROME ( AP>— Aldo Moro bid his 
family farewell in a letter saying 
"soon they will kill me," a Rome 
newspaper reported Sunday, while 
police arrested three more 
suspected supporters of the 
politician's Red Brigades terrorist 
kidnappers. 

The newspaper II Tempo said the 
letter was sent by Moro to his 
family on Friday. That was the day 
a message purportedly from the 
Red Brigades said they were 
carrying out their "death sen- 
tence" on the president of Italy's 
ruling Christian Democrat party. 

HUNDREDS of police searched 
the hills north of Rome on Sunday, 
continuing the hunt that has failed 
to find Moro or the persons who 
seized the former premier March 
16 in a Rome street ambush. 

n Tempo said Moro wrote: 
"Dear Norina, I was told that soon 
they will kill me. I kiss you for the 
last time, kiss the children." 
Norina is Moro's nickname for his 
wife Eleonora. 

The newspaper said the 61 -year- 
old Moro told his family that "if 
they (the government and the 
Christian Democrats) had wanted 
they would have done something." 

HE REFERRED to the refusals 
by the government and the party to 
negotiate with the kidnappers, who 
demanded the release of 13 im- 
prisoned terrorists in exchange for 
Moro's life. 

The newspaper said the "ad- 
dio"— goodbye— letter was very 
brief. They said it was picked up by 
Moro's daughter Anna in a public 
telephone booth in northern Rome, 
not far from Moro's home. 

Moro's family and police 
declined comment on the existence 
of the letter. 

Police said two men and a 
woman were arrested in Rome, 
bringing to 26 the number of 
persons detained in stepped-up 
operations since the Friday 
message attributed to the Red 
Brigades, who have said Moro was 
condemned to die because of his 
party's anti-proletarian policies. 



Every Monday 
Afternoon is 

BARGAIN DAY 

at PUTT-PUTT 

3Gamesfor$1.00 

Play as many games as you 

wish for $2.00. 



sz 



PUTT-PUTT 



GOLF COURSES, j 

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"Play Today & Chase 

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WestonH.W. 18 




Campus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
APPLICATIONS FOR SGA Student Affairs 
committee chairman and iac members art 
available In the SOS oil ice. ground floor of the 
Union, and are due May f at 5 p.m. 

COORDINATED UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAM IN DIETETICS applications are 
belno. taken In Justin 107 through May 13. 

SORORITY RUSH APPLICATIONS for fall 

IW8 are available In the Penbellenie office, 
Holtz HOB. Deadline for registration It July 
25 



TODAY 
INTERNATIONAL MEDITATION 
SOCIETY will meet In Union 207 at I p.m. for 
introductory presentation. 

KSU ORIENTEERING CLUB will meet In 
Military Science 11 at e:3u p.m. for elections, 

MORTAR BOARD will meet In Boyd Hall 
living room at 10: 30 p. m. 

LATIN AMERICAN TABLE will meet in 
Union Stateroom 1 at n 30 a.m. for program 
on Cost 9 Rica. 

DELTA PSI KAPPA will meet in Union 206 
at 7 p.m. 

HOME ECONOMICS COUNCIL Will meat in 
Hoffman Lounge, Justin Hall, at i :30p.m. 

ALPHA ZB.TA will meet in the Union Big I 
room at 7 p.m. 

ABO GRADUATE CLUB Will meet in Union 
Stateroom 3 at noon. 



ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CEN 
TER will meet at City Park at 5 to p.m. tor 

dinner 

NEW SPURS will meet at the international 
Center at a p.m. 

TUESDAY 
NORML will meet at Brother's Tavern at 
7:30 p.m. 

McCAIN AUDITORIUM STUDENT BOARD 
will meet at McCain Auditorium at 7 p.m. to 
plan for fall attractions 

KSU SPORT PARACHUTE CLUB will meet 
In the Union Big* room at! p.m. for elections. 
Attendance Is mandatory. 

PRE-KURSIHO STUDENTS will meet at 
McDonald's at 4 prn 



RUSSIAN TABLE 

Stateroom 3 at noon. 



will meet In Union 



ORADUATE SCHOOL announces the final 
oral defense of Carl Bartllng In Anderson mm 
at 3:30 p.m. 

LITTLE SISTER OF THE THETA Kt Will 
meet at the Theta XI house at 9:30 p.m. 

LUNCH BAO THEATER Will be in the 
Purple Masque Theatre at 1 p.m. Show is 
"Mlas Julia" and admission is free 

DESIGN COUNCIL PRESENTS L A Bash 

at EDRA conventions begin at ( p.m In Seaton 
205. Everyone is invited. Final meeting for the 
council IS al 7 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY 
GERMAN TABLE will meet In Union 
Stateroom 2 at 13:30 p.m. 




Collegian 

Summer and Fal 

STAFFS 

Applications 

are now being 

accepted. 

Available in Kedzie 103 

Deadline is 5:00 p.m. 

Wednesday, May 10 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO) 

THE SCHOOL TEAR 
IS ALMOST OVER! ijtfSrruCDC 
LET'S BRING /Vf"" nCK3 



!••• 



TAKE ONE LAST LOOK AT OUR 

WEEKLY SPECIALS 



MONDAY: H$ PITCHERS 

11.00 Admission with Student I.D. 

TUESDAY : 2 For 1 on ALL BEVERAGES 

SOt Admission with Student I.D. 
WEDNESDAY : FREE ADMISSION 

with Student I.D. 
THURSDAY: LADIES drink FREE draft 

beer 7:00-8:3Op.m. 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



\J%j\j^ tl f%J^ t J^J%if\f^J^fStt 



Hey, did you 

know the 
Royal Purples 

are coming? 

Distribution will begin Monday, May 8, 

at 1 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
Bring your second semester fee card. 




—Opinions — 

Art.(i*» *pp**ring on thu ptgt flo not n»c»ii«fily rt»roiint i*f entire Cotlefien 
vi*n sr it<r Board of iiuOtnt Pubhmtiont 



I 

A quest 
for 

honest 

evaluation 

I 



EDITOR'S NOT! 

evi1u»ti«ii 



This It ffte Hrtt pert •* • two-perl •dtteriil Ml l«thtft<Mirn 



University administrators should reevaluate 
teacher evaluations. 

The evaluations don't reflect the honest attitude of 
students, because students aren't guaranteed 
anonymity in filling out evaluation forms, and 
therefore, are less likely to express their opinions 
freelv 

Although the Office of Educational Resources, 
which is responsible for the design of the evaluation, 
suggests someone other than the teacher administers 
the evaluation, often instructors don't feel compelled 
to leave the room. This can easily influence how the 
students answer, 

ALSO, under the current system, computerized 
answer cards are returned to the instructor (often 
before final grades are issued). 



Bill Nadon 



The 4-year anthem 



It's over (well, almost). 1445 days ago—the 
summer months are included for tax reasons— a 
bespestacled, potential candidate for Secretary of 
State eased his 190 pound person into a grafitti 
riddled desk much like the one he left behind at SMW 
(Shawnee Mission Whatever). Knowledge he 
sought; an education he got. 

The price tag for the knowledge is currently 
estimated at $10,156; the cost of the education is a 
calcium-protruding loss of 21 pounds. 

What, then can be said for these four years during 
which (according to Masters and Johnson) my peak 
sexual performance has come and gone. 

I learned that going to college can be compared to 
the almighty white-collar profession; there is no 
escape from the pressure of getting things done. If 
one can cope with the whims of six college professors 
then the corporate ladder can't be much worse. 

I have since realized there is no way to win at the 
laundry mat. There is nothing more frustrating than 
washing five loads and not noticing until after 
returning home that the load of towels never made it 
past spin, and are patiently awaiting your rescue. 

POUR YEARS of college have taught me 
schedules are made to be broken. Last minute 
coordinating skills have been honed to a fine edge 
thanks to an allergic reaction to alarm clocks, 

I have learned the price of procrastination isn't 
cheap. Many a night my pillow has lost out to the 
coffee bean as the semesters drew to an inevitable 

end. 

I've found there is indeed discrimination in these 
halls of higher education. Not so much in skin color 
but in the way one choses to dress, the style of hair, 
die choice of living group and the curriculum chosen. 
Which leads me to believe there is no way to please 
everyone. 

Letters to the editor 



During these years I have deduced that ignorance 
is a component of bliss; bliss is also composed of 
insanity and legal tender but these are one in the 
same. So, the only way to cope with reality is to 
spend more than you make. 

FOUR YEARS of higher education has proven to 
me the sexual myth surrounding college coeds is Just 
a myth, perpetrated by horny males in their 40*s. 

Off-campus living has provided me with the skills 
needed to survive in the real world, primarily in the 
cooking department. I have learned how to cope with 
the trials of grocery shopping while in an altered 
state of consciousness and expand gastronomical 
horizons by inventing 32 recipes for whole wheat 
chocolate chip cookies. 

Unlike the average collegiate, I have resided in the 
same abode for the past three years. This has caused 
some problems. Telephone soHciters have Med to 
sell me aluminum siding, fantasic photography 
specials and a house on a lake in Nevada. It's 
amazing the reaction one gets when informing the 
salesmen of a recent double-amputation operation. 

MORE IMPORTANTLY I have survived these 

college days with the same roommate. It is 
somewhat comforting to know that there are a few 
Art Majors who comprehend the meaning of art. 

You have probably noticed that I have excluded 
the mention of knowledge other than the price. Too 
many people have wasted their college days trying 
to absorb as much data as possible. An education is 
not a collection of facts but a collage of concepts and 
experiences. 

One can learn much in 1,445 days ; much more than 
you realize. The trick is to keep your sanity 
Farewell. 



Stop passing the buck 



Editor, 



After having hist come from the 
"Talk with Acker" session, I feel it 
is necessary to express an opinion. 
Those in attendance were assured 
that President Acker would answer 
to the best of his ability questions 
concerning current University 



issues. If the answers President 
Acker gave were to the best of his 
ability, then this University is in 
trouble. 

For two hours. Acker played a 
verbal game of hide-and-seek with 
those asking honest questions. 
Many of his responses were 
prefaced by the phrase, "I would 



Kansas State Collegian 

Monday, MayS, 1978 

ime colleoi *N it published by Stvdent PuttlcetloM, inc.. Kantet Stat* Unlvertlty, 
daily axcapt Saturday, Sunday*. holldey* and vacation parlodt. 

OFFICII ara in tht norm win« at icedile Hall, phone aitSta 

SECOND CLASS BSMSJ aaM at Manhattan, KantaiMW. PwMteatnM M*. Itieie. 

suascairriOM rath 

SI J, on* calendar year,- ST JO. en* temetter 

TH* COLLEOtAN function* In a legal I v autonomous ralatlonimp with the Unlvertlty 
and it written and edited by student* serving ma University community. 

Chrl* Wdnam*, Editor 
Mark T India, Advertising Manager 

Oennr. Boone. Key Coles • • • ■ ■ Managing Editor* 

Jtti Anderson- Bechy Bertletf Newt editors 

Valine Houston Editorial Editor 

Tom Sell Photography Editor 

Barney Parker - -■■■■ * por !*"'! or 

Kevin Sahner ., Attt. Sports Editor 

Beecy Tanner -■- Features Ed or 

joleneHosi **»»■ Feature* Editor 

Jane H>goint, Li** Sendmeyer, Krl* Tilton Copy Editor i 

OeveHughet ■ • SSfESE 

OoooDenlel SGA Editor 

Aiiiton Srkelem Artt and Entertainment Editor 

Paul Rhodes. Tim Moren, Nancy Hortt, Jaton Sehatf, 

Bill Nedon, Dale Keinson, Mery Wood • Staff Writers 



really have to defer that question 
to...," and the phrases, "I try not to 
interfere with," and "I am not 
responsible for" were not un- 
common. Once he stated, "I don't 
stick my nose into their business." 
Questions were answered am- 
biguously, indecisively and 
evasively. Issues including the 
spring practice controversy, the 
resignation of Ellis Rainsberger, 
the size of the library and the 
question of why women are not on 
several key committees were 
given the run around by President 
Acker. I feel more confusion was 
aroused by this political jockeying 
than were solutions. The only 
absolute answer given was 
President Acker's admission that 
K-State has the smallest 
enrollment in the Big 8. 

I realize that Acker is a busy 
man, but if he did not have to defer 
questions, if he did interfere once 
in a while and if he was responsible 
for more, and he did stick his nose 
into their business, K-State would 
have more order, direction and 
students. I was forced to wonder if 
on the President's desk sits a sign 
reading, "The Buck Starts Here." 

KeUey Elder 
Senior in history 



Because cards are returned to teachers, the 
evaluations of students in smaller classes may easily 
be identified, especially if they are older or graduate 
students. Also, students who have had more than one 
class from the instructor may feel less compelled to 
write additional remarks on the reverse side lest their 
handwriting be identified. 

THESE problems could be solved if University 
administrators would set standards for evaluations 
which would guarantee students' opinions would 
remain totally anonymous. 

But unless the evaluations are totally anonymous, 
they are not an honest reflection of students' opinions 
and aren't worth the paper they're printed on. 

BECKY BARTLETT 
News Editor 



JU5T Ctit Q&m ODNOSRN'NG 7HI5 

Cam, aiALLWTtfN PR0Pf550R- 
YX) ASK TOR OWWETE HONESTY- 
DJHAT A& KU , A MSOCHiST? 




Out of the closet, 
into the cellar 



Editor, 

In reponse to Larry Decker 
(Letter to the Editor, May 2 
Collegian, "K-Staters need to open 
their minds") and his views on 
homosexuality, I would like to say 
that is totally unimportant as to 
whether or not a homosexual is 
considered "macho" or limp- 
wristed and effeminate. It's their 
minds that are limp. They are sick 
and need help, but instead receive 
encouragement from people such 
as Decker. 

What's really sad is that as a 
member of the K-State staff, 
Decker is in a position where 
people are influenced by what he 
says. Instead of taking a stand one 
way or the other, Decker believes 
we should just treat them like 
everyone else. 

The problem is that homosexuals 
have influence, too, and I for one 
don't care to have them influencing 
children who are in the process of 
developing their moral standards. 
Decker implies that Disneyland 
prefers to hire homosexuals 
because they are "clean cut and 



all-American. " That makes me 
wonder about the job application 
form. Is there a space to check if 
you are a homosexual? Doesn't 
sound constitutional to me. 

Decker seems to take pride in the 
fact that one of his homosexual 
friends was the centerfold in 
Playgirl What an honor! 9 

Decker says it's acceptable to 
call male homosexuals 
"girlfriends." I would be in- 
terested too know how Decker 
addresses his homosexual friends. 

The more casual we become 
toward homosexuals, the more 
they will thrive. I think "infectious 
disease" describes homosexuality 
very well. I hope this doesn't sound 
like I'm anti-homosexual. I think 
they should come out of the 
closet— and go into the cellar. I 
realize it would save space to use 
"gay" rather than "homosexual" 
occasionally, however, I prefer not 
to because "gay" used to be a nice 
word before homosexuality 
corrupted it. 

Dan MeGrath 
Sophomore In business 



The Collegian invites and 
encourages all readers to write 
letters to the editor and 
respond to Collegian editorial 
comments. 

All letters must be signed 
and proper identification must 
be included. This would include 
title or classification, major 
and telephone number. 



Because of time and space 
considerations, the editors 
reserve the right to shorten or 
reject material at their 
discretion. 

Letters may be submitted 
(preferably typed) in either 
Kedzie 116 or 103. 

All letters must be received 
by noon the day before 
publication. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon., May 8. 1S7t 



Letters to the editor 



Don't confuse the issues 



Editor, 



There have been a lot of garbled 
messages coming across in regard 
to the Domitrovic issue. Various 
letter-writers are helping to make 
a martyr of this man, which may 
be part of what he wishes. 

The Manhattan Mercury is 
helping considerably with his 
martyrdom, printing their "car- 
toon" portraying a swastika- 
emblazoned arm pointing a gun at 
a man named Domitrovic, with the 
caption "You don't have any rights 
to say what you think." Such 
tactics truly distort the case, and 
specifically diffuse the basic issue. 

There are two distinguishable 
issues involved: 1) Does 
Domitrovic have the right to 
exercise his free speech in this 
community? 2) Does Domitrovic 
have certain responsibilities and 
certain areas of constraint that are 
assumed when he accepts a 
position on the Manhattan Human 
Relations Board (MHRB)? 

Having been a member of the 
American Civil Liberties Union for 
over 30 years, and having ex- 
pended considerable effort on 
behalf of civil liberties in this 
community over the past 24 years, 
I think that I am qualified to 
comment on this issue. 

There are a lot of extraneous 
arguments which have been en- 
tered on Domitrovic 's behalf. The 



fact that Domitrovic has adopted a 
minority child and has hosted 
numerous foreign students may be 
a worthy and humane thing, but it 
is irrelevant to the issue of his 
publicly uttered statements. That 
he has served on the equal op- 
portunities board at the military 
base where he was stationed is 
interesting, but not germane to the 
question of his published 
statements. That he defends his 
position by posturing as a person 
merely trying to get people to think 
open-mindedly, is merely a tactic 
to sidetrack people from the real 
issue of racism. 

His arguments that there were 
really only 900,000 Jews killed, or 
that the death camps were really 
only "work camps," etc., are 
ridiculous arguments but, on the 
face of it, are matters of 
disputation (which I don't find 
worthy of disputing. ) 

However, when he leaves those 
"matters of dispute" and declares 
that the Jews had "told tremen- 
dously big lies," and that the 
"Jews have given us a lot of 
propaganda and tall tales"— he has 
crossed over into other territory. 
He has left the domain of factual 
dispute and has engaged in a racist 
attack upon a whole people. There 
is a clear difference between the 
two, and that difference constitutes 
the difference between legitimate 



public discussion and racial 
bigotry. 

I would be the first to espouse 
and defend his right to spew his 
anti-semitic attitudes here or 
anywhere else. I would be the last 
to defend his presence on the 
MHRB. 

For 24 years, I have exercised 
the right of free speech in this 
community on a variety of un- 
popular issues (racial 
discrimination, Vietnam, abortion, 
the student protestors at the Nixon 
speech in Ahearn Field House, 
etc.). No one has ever asked me to 
serve on the MHRB for reasons 
which are somewhat apparent. 
Moreover, if I were to be asked to 
serve on that board, 1 would 
probably decline, simply because I 
would want to retain the freedom 
to lie open and critical whenever I 
felt like it. But if I WERE on that 
board and felt the call to speak out 
on a policy which was in conflict 
with the board's policy, I would 
assume that the City Commission 
would have every right to replace 
me with someone else. That would 
not constitute a violation of my 
First Amendment rights. 

So it is with Domitrovic. Let's not 

confuse the issue of free speech 

with the issue of responsible 

representation on an official body. 

Warren Rempel 

United Ministries in Higher 

Education 



What's a hospital if it can't treat pain? 



Editor, 

Last Monday morning (May 1), 
while I was in chemistry lab, I was 
unfortunate enough to spill some 
melted stearic acid on my thumb. 

After holding my thumb under 
cold water, I asked my instructor if 
there were any other procedures to 
follow. She told me to go to Lafene 
Student Health Center. 

As anyone who has been burned 
knows, I was going through quite a 
bit of pain. I rushed over to Lafene, 
only to be turned away when the 



attendant saw that I didn't have 
student health stamped on my ID. 
card. 

I can understand being turned 
away for not having student health 
if it had been a routine problem. 
However, this was an emergency 
and the bum wasn't healing itself. 

The only course of action I had 
was to run to my car (parked three 
blocks west of campus as I am a 
freshman) and proceed to the 
nearest emergency room of a 
hospital that wouldn't turn me 
away. 1 went to my doctor's office 



'Yee' can't find it 



Editor, 



RE: Steven Yee's May 4 letter, 
"Rock bottom." 

If Yee can't find the humor in a 
little bit of satire, maybe he should 
go home and grow up. I personally 
enjoy a little bit of humor (I con- 
sider the Collegian a joke, anyway) 
to break the dull routine of 
studying. I'm sure Yee could find 
more worthwhile problems to 
complain about instead of "por- 
nography" shown by the Collegian. 
Had the man been facing forward, 
perhaps Yee would have had a 
complaint, but I doubt that anyone 



learned anything about human 
anatomy from that cartoon. 

As for competing with Playboy, I 
doubt it. A picture of a male with 
no "pants on is more able of com- 
peting with Playgirl, but does Yee 
know the difference? 

Randy Buitnel 
Graduate student In ag education 



and received prompt attention. 

MY DOCTOR commented that 
he didn't understand why Lafene 
had turned me away, as he had 
understood that they handled 
emergencies. He also thought the 
burn was serious enough to be 
called an emergency and that it 
warranted a check-up later in the 
day. 

As a student in pre-nursing and 
as an aide at Manhattan's St. 
Mary's Hospital, I have come into 
contact with varying degrees of 
emergencies and illnesses, along 
with discomfort from minor aches 
and pains. 

I have always had the utmost 
respect and faith in the medical 
profession, until I found myself on 
the patient's side at Lafene. 

I believe this center should set up 
standard procedures for 
emergencies like mine, and that 
they shouldn't turn away anybody 
in pain— even if they aren't con- 
nected with K State 

Ann Tarvestad 
Freshman Id pre-nursing 




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Bossier A Assoc. 

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Topeka, Ks. 66612 

913/234-5626 




DEAD WEEK 

SPECIALS 

ALL WEEK! 



(Mr. K's Care Package For Yon! ) 



MONDAY 

5 C NITE! 




• 5* Draws <«:•») 

• 5 C Socond PftcJisrs <9-io : oo> 

• 50* AdlB. <1» Nickels With K8U I. D. ) 

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luRliSkS 



Impression's. 



By Kyoko 




GRAND OPENING 

May 11, 12 and 13 

Looking for the newest look? At Impressions, 
new stylists, Debbie and Grace are offering 50% 
off all haircuts through the month of May. (With 
K-Statel.D.) 

While you're there, be sure to register for the 
Grand Opening drawing. Prizes include two per- 
manent waves, 10 haircuts, 20 conditioner treat- 
ments plus various Redken products. 

UlPoynU 50% OFF 537-1332 .. 

"SBf «REDKEN/R*V I 

Must present coupon for discount 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon , May ft, t»7» 



Court expects Son of Sam 
to enter guilty plea today 



NEW YORK (AP)-The city's 
criminal court system plans to 
accept possible guilty pleas from 
David Berkowitz, the "Son of 
Sam," who is accused of killing six 
women during a year-long 
terrorization of the city. 

The orgy of random murder 
gripped New York City with a 
terror reminiscent of Jack the 
Ripper's 19th-century London, 
prior to Berkowitz's arrest at his 
suburban Yonkers home last 
summer. 

The pudgy, 24-year-old ex-postal 

MEChA students 
receive awards 

Mexican-American Academic 
Scholarships were awarded 
Saturday to a K-State freshman 
and a prospective K -State student. 

Theresa Guillen, freshman in 
theater and mass com- 
munications, received one of the 
$400 scholarships. Guillen is also 
president of MEChA. 

Connie Ochoa, a senior at Ed- 
wards v ill e High School, also 
received a $400 scholarship. 

The scholarships were awarded 
to Mexican-American students by 
the Mexican-American Alummni 
Association. 

Jtfartin Luther King Scholar- 
ships of $25 each were awarded to 
outstanding MEChA members in 
each class and one to an overall 
outstanding member of the 
organization. 

Guillen received the King 
scholarship for outstanding fresh- 
man student, Janette Guillen, a 
sophomore in secondary 
education and bilingual education 
received the scholarship for 
outstanding sophomore. 

Rebecca Leon, a Junior in social 
work, received the scholarship for 
outstanding Junior and Lucas 
Herme, senior in bakery science 
management, received the award 
for outstanding senior. 

An overall outstanding MEChA 
academic scholarship went to 
Susan Riphahn, graduate student 
in elementary education. 

The awards were presented at 
the first K-State Mexican- 
American Alumni Scholarship 
Awards Banquet held in the Flint 
Hills room of the K-State Union. 



clerk has admitted all six murders. 
His lawyers want him to plead 
innocent to each by reason of in- 
sanity. 

TODAY HE goes before state 
Supreme Court Justice Joseph 
Corso in Brooklyn. If Berkowitz 
pleads guilty, as expected, an 
unusual plan will take effect. 
Judges from the three jurisdictions 
where Son of Sam is accused of 
striking will appear in the cour- 
troom prepared to accept guilty 
pleas to all charges against 
Berkowitz. 

Under the plan, Berkowitz could 
first offer Corso a guilty plea to the 
fatal shooting last July 31 in 
Brooklyn of Stacy Moskowitz, 20, 
the last of the Son of Sam victims. 

Guilty pleas to all six murders 
would make Berkowitz liable to a 
maximum sentence on all six 
counts of 25 years to life, with 
parole possible, but unlikely, after 
the minimum term. 

WHETHER Berkowitz had 
firmly decided to plead guilty was 
unknown Sunday. His attorneys 
and representatives of Brooklyn 
District Attorney Eugene Gold 
refused comment, citing a court 
gag order. 

Since he has twice been ruled 
competent to stand trial, 
Berkowitz has the legal right to 
change his plea from innocent by 
reason of insanity to guilty in the 
slaying of Moskowitz. 

Moskowitz, fatally wounded 
under a full summer's moon near 
the Brooklyn waterfront, was said 
to have been a last-minute target of 
opportunity, after the killer's first- 
choice victim unwittingly moved 
out of the range of his deadly, snub- 
nosed 44-caliber revolver. 




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Z ™SJ V PHIL SILVERS W GILFORD ■ BISTER KHTON 

-A FINNY THING HAPPENED ONTHEWAYTOTHE FORUM' 





TUESDAY 

K-State Union Little Theatre 3:30 
Forum Hail 7:30 

$]00 




BERKOWITZ said Stacy was 
among six young persons he was 
driven to kill because of demonic 
possession by a man he called 
Sam. 

'i shot those people and that's all 
that matters to them, you know," 
Berkowitz told psychiatrists later. 
"The explanations are of no value. 
It's swift and simple, you know. I 
shot those people." 

In excerpts purportedly from his 
diary, Berkowitz said, "I guess I 
am addicted to killing since Sam 
has me working like a clock at 
regular intervals. I just hope 
people can see my torment and 
lock me away some place and 
thro